How To Protect The Ocean

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S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

Northern Right Whale Threats
The North Atlantic right whale is an endangered species, and its presence near lobster fishing areas can pose a threat to the whale population. The main concerns are ship strikes and entanglement with fishing lines, which have both been responsible for injuries and fatalities among these majestic creatures. As the northern right whales venture higher and further north in Canada, the task of managing their interactions with human activities becomes increasingly challenging. Recognizing the importance of prioritizing the protection of these endangered species, cautious methods are being employed to mitigate any potential harm caused by the fishing industry. During the podcast, I discussed how sightings of Northern right whales in the vicinity of Prince Edward Island prompted the temporary closure of a lobster fishing area. With high stakes, it is crucial to strike a balance between preserving these whales' well-being, preserving the fishermen's livelihood, and maintaining the environment's delicate balance. Fishermen in the region have been doing their part to achieve this balance by working with the Department of Fisheries Oceans to adopt eco-friendly and sustainable practices.

Economic Consequences
The temporary closure of the lobster fishing area represents a setback for local fishermen who rely on their catch to make a living. The peak lobster season is ongoing, and the closure may have a significant financial impact on the affected fishers. Despite the potential economic consequences, the preservation of an endangered species has to be prioritized. The challenge lies in finding alternative solutions that can successfully mitigate whale interactions without hampering the fishermen's livelihood. The possible economic repercussions of the temporary closure were acknowledged. The podcast highlighted the importance of finding new management methods and solutions to address the issue. By working together, all parties involved can explore and implement innovative approaches that ensure sustainable fishing practices without compromising marine ecosystems and the vulnerable northern right whales.

Closure Details
The closure of the portion of the lobster fishing area 24 applies to waters 18 meters deep, with shallower waters remaining open for fishing activities. The Department of Fisheries Oceans has granted a 96-hour window for the removal of fishing gear, and the closure will persist for 15 days. However, if no subsequent sightings of right whales occur in the area, the closure may be lifted sooner, allowing fishermen to resume their activities.

Link to article: https://bit.ly/3Mz2Qt8

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1460_RightWhaleSightingsHaltsLobsterFishery.mp3
Category:Whales -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Join Inaki Ruiz on his journey to save the oceans, but be prepared for the unexpected twist that will leave you inspired and questioning what more you can do to make a difference.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Decipher the significance of environmental engineering in addressing climate change issues.

  • Realize the importance of spreading knowledge about climate change's effects on marine life.

  • Harness the power of youth-driven actions and solutions for change.

  • Simplify intricate scientific ideas for a wider, non-specialist audience.

  • Advocate for cycling as a sustainable alternative to tackle congestion and lower emissions.

My special guest is Inaki Ruiz

Introducing Inaki Ruiz, a dedicated environmental engineering student from Mexico City, who's making a difference in the world of sustainability. While initially enrolled in civil engineering, Inaki's passion for the environment led him to switch majors and co-found an ocean awareness organization with his classmates. Currently studying in Puerto Rico on an exchange program, Inaki continues to broaden his knowledge and understanding of environmental issues. As an advocate for sustainable transportation, Inaki is well-equipped to discuss the benefits of cycling as a way to alleviate traffic congestion and reduce carbon emissions.

Connect with Inaki's organization: https://www.instagram.com/natures_herald/

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1459_ConservationStory_InakiRuiz.mp3
Category:Conservation Story -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

I discuss the unusual behavior of a sub pod of critically endangered orcas off the coast of Spain. Since 2020, these orcas have been ramming sailboats, causing damage and even sinking vessels in 3 cases. The motive behind these events remains a mystery, but some theories suggest that the noise from boat engines or a traumatic event involving the orcas may be triggering this behavior. I talk about the various interactions between orcas and boats worldwide, emphasizing that orcas have not harmed humans in the wild. However, the recent incidents in Spain have raised concerns for both boat safety and the welfare of the orcas. To protect both parties, there may be a ban on certain boat types in the area. I will update you on any new events or policies that come from these events.

Link to articles:
https://bit.ly/3MMT1sX
https://bit.ly/3WtYat3

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1458_OrcasSink3BoatsNearStraitofGibraltor.mp3
Category:Orcas -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Thao Nguyen is a travel content creator with a background in marine conservation. She shares her inspiring journey, from doing graduate work on Marine Protected Areas in Indonesia to working in renewable energy to pursuing her passion for marine conservation. She discusses her transition into content creation, focusing on travel and marine conservation, and explains how she aims to inspire others, especially solo female travelers, to explore the world sustainably. Tune in to hear Thao's unique experiences and her perspective on being a creator in the travel industry while benefitting marine conservation and local people.

Connect with Thao Nguyen:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thaonguyening
Website: www.thaotalks.com

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1457_ConservationStory_ThaoNguyen.mp3
Category:Conservation Story -- posted at: 7:10pm EDT

Are you tired of feeling frustrated and powerless in the face of misinformation about climate change? Have you been told to simply recycle and turn off the lights, only to see little progress toward a sustainable future? It's time to take action by recognizing fallacies and promoting productive conservation conversations. Join us in this episode as we explore the benefits of transitioning from fossil fuels, uncover ditactics, envision a sustainable economy, and gain the skills to detect fallacious arguments. Let's combat misinformation and work towards a healthier planet together.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Discover the long-term advantages of replacing fossil fuels with more sustainable energy sources.

  • Expose the diversion tactics utilized to sidetrack focus on climate change problems.

  • Contemplate the steps required to establish an economy resilient against environmentally damaging practices.

  • Understand the impact of effective communication by scientists and policymakers in lessening fossil fuel consumption.

  • Enhance your skills in discerning fallacious arguments that impede conservation progress.

 

The resources mentioned in this episode are:

  • Reduce your personal use of fossil fuels by using public transportation, biking, or walking whenever possible.

  • Support companies that prioritize sustainability and have transparent supply chains.

  • Educate yourself and others on the red herring fallacy and how to identify and challenge diversion tactics in conversations about climate change and ocean protection.

  • Advocate for government policies that prioritize reducing the use of fossil fuels and transitioning to a sustainable economy.

  • Support and invest in research and development of alternative energy sources and carbon sequestration technology.

  • Take action on a local level by participating in beach cleanups, supporting local conservation organizations, and advocating for environmental protections in your community.

Cutting Through the BS
It is critical to pierce through the obfuscation and challenge manipulation tactics in environmental conversations, specifically addressing fallacies such as red herrings. By maintaining a keen awareness of these deceptive approaches and calling them out, individuals can ensure that conversations remain focused on the relevant issues, contributing to meaningful progress in combating climate change and protecting our oceans. In his podcast episode, Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of identifying and challenging the diversion tactics and fallacies used to sidetrack essential discussions about climate change and environmental conservation. He encourages listeners to be aware of these tactics in conversations and to remain steadfast in focusing on the central issues at hand. By cutting through these distractions, one can facilitate a more productive and impactful conversation surrounding environmental issues.

Call to Action
Individuals, communities, and governments must take action to recognize fallacies, maintain focus during conversations, and work together to address the pressing environmental issues we face. By sharing experiences, knowledge, and stories, we can inspire others and promote a united effort toward environmental conservation and responsibility. Andrew Lewin asks listeners to share their thoughts on the impact of fallacies in conservation efforts, inviting open conversation and encouraging community building through shared experiences. He emphasizes the importance of inspiring others by sharing personal conservation journeys and challenges encountered in their efforts. Through open dialogue, collaborative thinking, and a unified focus on the environmental challenges we face, meaningful progress toward sustainability can be made.

Focus on Transitioning to a Sustainable Economy
Shifting the focus of the conservation debate to emphasize the importance of transitioning to a sustainable economy is essential in addressing the impacts of climate change. By placing attention on renewable energy sources, sustainable practices, and eco-friendly developments, individuals, communities, and entire nations can work together to create a future that minimizes harm to our environment while fostering economic growth. Andrew Lewin encourages science communicators, climate activists, and policymakers to concentrate on reducing fossil fuel use and supporting companies and technologies striving for sustainability. He calls for empathetic and focused conversations that consider the multifaceted impact of climate change on our planet, emphasizing that this transition to a sustainable economy is crucial in the quest to protect our oceans.

Link to Article: https://bit.ly/3I9PnXb

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 
Direct download: HTPTO_E1456_ManipulationOfTheFossilFuelIndustry.mp3
Category:SciComm -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Just when I thought I understood the delicate balance between nature and human intervention along coastlines, the Dunes project revealed an unexpected twist that left me stunned. Get ready for a jaw-dropping revelation that will challenge everything you thought you knew about protecting our vulnerable shorelines.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Discover the critical role of sand dunes in safeguarding coastlines against erosion.

  • Uncover the objectives of the Dunes project in pinpointing vulnerable zones and preparing for erosion.

  • Realize the vulnerability of European nations to climate change and coastal flooding.

  • Delve into the history of human-environment interactions in coastal areas across the globe.

  • Find inspiration to take a stand in safeguarding our oceans for future generations.

If we can't do that [prepare for the vulnerability of coastal communities], those coastal communities are at risk and we don't know which ones will be more at risk than others. And these are people's livelihoods that we're talking about. - Andrew Lewin

The resources mentioned in this episode are:

  • Share your thoughts on coastal flooding and erosion on Instagram at @howtoprotecttheocean (https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG).

  • Book a conservation journey interview with Andrew Lewin through the calendar link: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview

  • Check out the Dunes project article on phys.org (https://bit.ly/3nDEpSR) for more information on how sand dunes can act as a barrier against erosion and flooding.

  • Consider using natural systems, such as sand dunes, to protect against erosion and flooding rather than human-altered systems.

  • Prepare for climate change and adapt to the consequences by identifying vulnerable areas and fortifying them with natural or human-altered systems.

  • Show appreciation for mothers and the sacrifices they make for their families.

Building on Past Successes
Looking back at successful conservation efforts is vital in shaping the future of environmental protection. Understanding the factors that have contributed to these victories can offer valuable lessons and inspiration for future initiatives. In the podcast, Andrew Lewin expresses excitement for upcoming episodes, which will delve into past successes and challenges facing conservation efforts. By hearing from experts in ocean conservation, marine biology, and related fields, Lewin hopes to inspire others to take action and build on previous accomplishments, ultimately achieving positive results in protecting our oceans.

Challenges in Conservation
The numerous challenges facing ocean conservation can seem insurmountable. However, understanding these obstacles and learning how to navigate them is key to protecting our coastlines and the marine ecosystems they support. Throughout the podcast, Andrew Lewin speaks passionately about the threats to our oceans and emphasizes the importance of overcoming these challenges. He calls listeners to action, encouraging them to take simple steps such as reducing single-use plastic to make a difference. By highlighting the successes and obstacles in conservation efforts, Lewin’s podcast promises to offer valuable insights and advice that can inspire and guide coastal residents in their own battles to protect the ocean.

Dune's Evolution
Understanding the evolution of sand dunes is vital to protecting coastlines from erosion. By learning how dunes have formed and developed over time, coastal residents can adapt their strategies to better suit the changing landscape. The interactions between humans and their coastal environments have left their mark on dunes, shaping their past and future evolution. During the podcast, Andrew Lewin discusses the international span of the Dunes project, which is researching coastal regions across countries like France, Portugal, the UK, Brazil, Mozambique, North America, and New Zealand. By examining the history of human-environment interactions in these coastal areas, the Dunes project aims to gain insights into how dunes have evolved and will continue to act as barriers against erosion in the face of climate change.

 

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1455_SandDunesCoastalErosion.mp3
Category:Sand Dunes -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Sargassum, a type of giant seaweed, has been washing up on the shores of Florida earlier than ever before. Sargassum is a brown algae that forms large mats or blobs in the ocean, and its excessive presence can have detrimental effects on marine ecosystems and coastal communities. The seaweed can disrupt tourism, damage coral reefs, and deplete oxygen levels in the water, leading to the death of marine life. I covered the causes behind the increase in sargassum blooms, including climate change and nutrient pollution from agricultural activities in other episodes. In today's episode, I explore the opportunities and challenges of disposing of sargassum in Key West.
 
Link to monitoring Sargassum site: https://cwcgom.aoml.noaa.gov/SIR/
 
Link to article: https://bit.ly/3pfTHO8
 
Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 
Direct download: HTPRO_E1454_FloridasSargassum.mp3
Category:Sargassum -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Canada has implemented a ban on single-use plastic products as part of its goal to achieve zero plastic waste by 2030. However, environmentalists are concerned about the increasing use of paper packaging as a substitute. Nicole Rycroft, the founder of Canopy, a nonprofit organization working to protect forests, warns that the shift to paper is leading to deforestation and forest degradation. She estimates that over three billion trees, including old-growth and endangered trees, are logged annually to produce paper-based products. In addition to deforestation, the production of paper requires significant amounts of energy and water. While paper is more biodegradable and easier to recycle than plastic, the grade of paper affects its recyclability. Furthermore, when paper ends up in landfills, it decomposes and releases methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The paper industry is exploring alternative solutions such as using agricultural waste like straw, hemp, flax, tomato stems, and banana peels to make sustainable single-use products. Biodegradable resins are also being used but are often expensive and have limited applications. Waste policies should transition away from a single-use model, and consumers are encouraged to choose reusable packaging whenever possible to achieve more sustainable outcomes.
 
 
Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1453_PlasticToPaperCanada.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Indigenous communities in Hawaii are reviving an ancient stewardship and conservation system known as ahupua'a. The system divides the islands into long wedges running from the mountains to the ocean and allows for the holistic management of resources. Three communities—Hā'ena, Heʻeia, and Kaʻūpūlehu—have successfully restored ahupua'a practices and co-manage resources with government and private landowners. They have established Indigenous and community-conserved areas (ICCAs) within their territories, leveraging rights and resources previously taken from them. The communities' efforts have led to positive outcomes such as increased fish populations and recognition for innovative conservation initiatives. The success of these communities serves as an example of embracing Indigenous culture and conservation practices for the benefit of both humans and nature.
 
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1452_HawaiiLocalConservation1.mp3
Category:Indigenous -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Google has been found to have monetized videos promoting climate crisis misinformation on YouTube as recently as April 2023, according to a report by the Climate Action Against Disinformation coalition. The report highlights 100 videos denying that greenhouse gas emissions caused by burning fossil fuels are responsible for climate change, as well as 100 videos featuring deceptive content on tackling climate change. Google updated its policies in October 2021 to prohibit ads and monetization of content contradicting the scientific consensus on climate change. However, examples of videos violating this policy still ran with preroll advertising for a mosquito lamp.
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1451_GoogleMonetizesClimateChangeDenierVids.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 10:49am EDT

Transport Canada has announced 10 measures to protect the critically endangered southern resident orcas off the British Columbia coast, including mandatory speed zones in two areas near Swiftsure Bank, fishing closures, and interim sanctuary zones. Commercial and recreational salmon fishing will be banned this summer and fall throughout the waters of the southern Gulf Islands. From now until May 31, 2024, vessels are required to stay at least 400 meters away from all orcas in southern B.C. coastal waters. However, cetacean researcher and senior research scientist with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Lance Barrett-Lennard, said the measures need to go much further to help the animals thrive, including much broader fishing restrictions throughout their critical habitat.
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1450_ProtectionsForOrcas.mp3
Category:Orcas -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

A new book argues that the social sciences, including anthropology, economics, human geography, political science, psychology, and sociology, are key to effective conservation. Conservation Social Science: Understanding People, Conserving Biodiversity argues that human behaviour is often overlooked when it comes to developing conservation solutions, which ultimately require changing the way people interact with the environment. Effective conservation requires understanding the consequences for species and ecosystems, as well as people and their livelihoods. Conservationists can navigate key questions that surround establishing a protected area by using a political science lens, such as who has the power to make the rules and whose voices are underrepresented. The answers to these questions have profound implications for both nature and people. The book also calls for impact evaluation, an approach that can help us understand how the design and management of a conservation project affects not only species and ecosystems but also the lives and livelihoods of local people who depend on them.
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1449_SocialScienceAndMarineConservation.mp3
Category:Human Behavior -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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