How To Protect The Ocean (Science Communication)

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Syndication

Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of controlling your content schedule to prevent burnout and maintain a consistent publishing frequency. He shares insights on the mindset needed for effective science communication, encouraging listeners to focus on their passion for the ocean.

Tune in for discussions on science, conservation, and ways to protect the ocean.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 

Batch recording episodes is a valuable strategy that can help prevent burnout and create more time to enjoy life outside of content creation. In a recent podcast episode, the host emphasized the importance of batch recording to maintain a consistent publishing schedule without letting it control your life. By recording multiple episodes in one sitting, content creators can free up time during the week for other activities, such as spending time with family, enjoying hobbies, or simply relaxing.

The host shared personal experiences of almost burning out while trying to produce episodes before going on vacation. This situation highlighted the need to find a balance between creating content and living a fulfilling life. Batch recording allows content creators to work efficiently and effectively, reducing the stress and pressure of constantly producing new material.

Furthermore, batch recording not only helps prevent burnout but also enables content creators to focus on quality over quantity. By dedicating specific time blocks to record episodes, creators can ensure that each episode is well-researched, well-prepared, and engaging for the audience. This approach can lead to more thoughtful and impactful content that resonates with listeners.

Overall, the practice of batch recording episodes serves as a practical solution to maintain a consistent content schedule while also prioritizing personal well-being and enjoyment outside of content creation. It allows content creators to strike a balance between work and life, ultimately leading to a more sustainable and fulfilling approach to producing content.

Building relationships with your audience through long-form content is a crucial aspect of effective science communication. In the podcast episode, the host emphasizes the importance of spending time with the audience and engaging them in meaningful conversations about ocean science and conservation. By adopting a mindset of spending quality time with the audience, content creators can establish a strong connection and build trust with their viewers or listeners.

Long-form content allows for in-depth discussions and the exploration of complex topics related to ocean science and conservation. The host highlights the value of producing content that encourages the audience to spend time listening or watching, thereby fostering a deeper understanding of the subject matter. Through long-form content, creators can provide detailed insights, share stories, and offer educational resources that resonate with the audience.

By focusing on long-form content, content creators can create a platform for meaningful engagement and education. The podcast episode suggests that by investing time in producing quality long-form content, creators can effectively communicate their message and establish themselves as reliable sources of information. This approach not only educates the audience but also cultivates a sense of community and shared interest in ocean conservation.

Furthermore, the episode emphasizes the idea of building relationships with the audience through consistent and engaging content. By dedicating time to create long-form content that sparks conversations and encourages interaction, content creators can foster a sense of connection and trust with their audience. This relationship-building aspect is essential for sustaining interest, encouraging participation, and ultimately driving positive action towards ocean conservation.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1584_SciCommSpeandingTimeWithYourAudience.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses his workflow for creating consistent science communication content on both his podcast and YouTube channel. He delves into how he manages to post three times a week for the audio podcast and two episodes a week for the YouTube channel. Join Andrew as he shares insights on staying consistent and productive in the world of science communication.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 

Consistency is a fundamental aspect of science communication across various platforms such as podcasting, YouTube, and social media. Andrew Lewin stresses the significance of maintaining a regular schedule to cultivate a loyal audience and establish credibility in the field. Drawing from his own experience of producing multiple episodes per week for his podcast and YouTube channel, Andrew highlights the challenges and rewards of staying consistent.

Andrew's journey illustrates that consistency is not solely about frequency but also about quality. By consistently delivering valuable and engaging content, you can attract and retain listeners or viewers who rely on your expertise and insights. Whether you're sharing research findings, discussing conservation efforts, or providing educational content, maintaining a consistent presence helps you build trust and authority in your niche.

Consistency also plays a crucial role in audience engagement and growth. Regularly publishing content creates anticipation among your audience, encouraging them to return for more. Over time, this consistent presence can lead to increased visibility, word-of-mouth referrals, and a dedicated following. Andrew's advice to plan out content, record regularly, and publish consistently aligns with the idea that steady effort yields long-term results in science communication.

In conclusion, Andrew Lewin's emphasis on consistency underscores the importance of dedication and perseverance in science communication. By committing to a regular schedule, maintaining quality content, and engaging with your audience consistently, you can make a meaningful impact in sharing scientific knowledge, raising awareness about environmental issues, and inspiring action for a better future.

Planning and batching content creation can significantly enhance workflow and efficiency in science communication endeavors. As discussed in Andrew Lewin's podcast episode, having a structured plan and batching content creation can streamline the process and ensure consistent output.

Andrew stresses the importance of planning content in advance, whether starting a podcast, YouTube channel, or any other form of science communication. Taking time to brainstorm ideas, outline episodes, and schedule recordings helps you stay organized and focused on your goals. By setting aside dedicated time to plan content, you ensure a clear direction and purpose for each piece of content.

Batching content creation involves recording multiple episodes or videos in one sitting, which boosts efficiency and effectiveness. Andrew shares his experience of batch recording on weekends to free up time during the week for other tasks. By recording several episodes at once, you can maintain a creative flow and minimize interruptions, resulting in a more cohesive and consistent output.

Furthermore, batching content creation enhances content quality. With the opportunity to focus solely on creation without distractions, you can delve deeper into topics, conduct thorough research, and deliver engaging and informative content. Batching allows you to immerse yourself in the creative process and produce high-quality content that resonates with your audience.

In conclusion, planning and batching content creation are essential strategies for maintaining workflow and efficiency in science communication. By investing time in planning content and batching recording sessions, you can enhance the quality of your work, stay consistent with your output, and ultimately, make a greater impact in sharing your message with the world.

In this episode, Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of sharing knowledge and passion when embarking on a science communication journey. He highlights that the quality of content improves over time with practice and dedication. Andrew shares his experience of starting his podcast and YouTube channel, acknowledging that his early episodes were not perfect, but he continued to produce content consistently.

Andrew encourages aspiring science communicators to focus on their passion and share that enthusiasm with their audience. It's crucial to discuss topics you are knowledgeable about and comfortable with. By doing so, you can establish a connection with your audience and build credibility over time.

Throughout the episode, Andrew stresses that practice and dedication are key to enhancing content quality. While his early episodes were not his best work, through consistent effort and a commitment to sharing valuable information, he refined his skills and created more engaging content.

The message from this episode is clear: focus on sharing your passion and knowledge, and the quality of your content will naturally improve with time and practice. By staying dedicated to your craft and continuing to produce content, you can develop your skills as a science communicator and make a meaningful impact in your chosen field.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1575_IStartedAYouTubeChannel.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Science communication plays a crucial role in ocean conservation. Andrew emphasizes the significance of science communication in marine science and conservation. The lack of public understanding of the ocean and its conservation issues prompted Andrew to become a science communicator. He highlights the historical reluctance of scientists to communicate with the public due to concerns about misrepresentation by journalists. However, with the advent of technology and various platforms, science communication has evolved and become more accessible. The host believes that science communication is not just about posting on social media but about building relationships with the audience and conveying messages effectively. They argue that science communication is essential for creating awareness, inspiring action, and effecting change in marine conservation. Andrew encourages support for science communicators and predicts a promising future for the profession.

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Science communication is highlighted as one of the most important aspects of marine conservation in the podcast episode. The host, Andrew Lewin, emphasizes the significance of science communication in his own journey as a science communicator in marine science and conservation. He explains that science communication is the reason why he changed his profession and started the How to Protect the Ocean podcast.

According to Lewin, science communication plays a crucial role in bridging the gap between scientists and the public. In the past, scientists were hesitant to communicate their research outside of their professional circles due to concerns about their words being manipulated or misinterpreted by journalists. However, this lack of communication resulted in a limited understanding of the ocean among the general public.

Lewin believes that science communication is essential for raising awareness about marine conservation issues and inspiring action. By effectively communicating scientific knowledge and research findings, science communicators can engage the public and encourage behavior changes that contribute to the protection of the ocean.

The podcast episode also highlights the growth of science communication as a profession in the field of marine science and conservation. Lewin notes that more organizations, including government departments and private companies, are hiring professionals in sustainability and communications to effectively convey their messages and engage with their audiences.

Furthermore, Lewin emphasizes that science communication is not limited to social media platforms. While social media plays a significant role in content dissemination, science communication involves various mediums such as press releases, blogs, campaigns, and podcasts. The goal of science communication is to convey a message and inspire action, whether it is through educating the public, influencing policy decisions, or encouraging support for conservation initiatives.

In conclusion, science communication is recognized as a vital component of marine conservation. It serves as a bridge between scientists and the public, enabling the dissemination of scientific knowledge and inspiring action to protect the ocean. The growth of science communication as a profession highlights its increasing importance in effectively conveying messages and engaging with audiences in the field of marine science and conservation.

The future of science communication is bright and promising, with new trends and styles emerging. As mentioned in the podcast episode, science communication has evolved significantly over the past few decades, thanks to advancements in technology and the rise of social media platforms. Creators from various backgrounds are now using these platforms to share their knowledge and passion for science, particularly in the field of marine conservation.

One of the exciting aspects of the future of science communication is the emergence of new trends and styles. Content creators are finding innovative ways to engage their audience and deliver scientific information in a captivating manner. For example, some creators use vlogs to document their field studies, taking viewers on virtual field trips and providing a behind-the-scenes look at the life of a marine biologist. Others incorporate gaming elements into their content, combining entertainment with educational messages about ocean conservation.

With the increasing popularity of platforms like TikTok and Instagram, science communication is becoming more accessible and appealing to a wider audience. Short-form videos and visually appealing content are gaining traction, allowing creators to convey scientific concepts in a concise and engaging manner. This trend is likely to continue, as it caters to the fast-paced nature of social media consumption.

Furthermore, the future of science communication will see the integration of larger trends and issues into the messaging. Creators will not only focus on sharing scientific knowledge but also on addressing pressing environmental concerns such as plastic pollution, overfishing, and climate change. By connecting scientific information to real-world problems, science communicators can inspire action and encourage individuals to make a positive impact on the environment.

It is important to support and follow these emerging trends and styles in science communication. By engaging with and sharing content from these creators, we can help amplify their messages and reach a broader audience. Additionally, providing feedback and encouragement to science communicators can motivate them to continue their important work.

In conclusion, the future of science communication in marine conservation is promising. With new trends and styles emerging, content creators are finding innovative ways to engage audiences and deliver scientific information. By supporting and following these creators, we can contribute to the growth and impact of science communication in protecting our oceans.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1565_SciCommAsAProfessions.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin and guest Natalie Gilson, Vice President of Science Communication for Pisces Research Project Management Incorporated discuss the importance of effective communication for nonprofit organizations.

They explore the need for nonprofits to make their supporters feel like a part of a community rather than just constantly asking for donations. The conversation delves into potential solutions, such as building strong relationships with supporters and creating engaging content.

Tune in to learn more about improving nonprofit communications and fostering a sense of community.

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In this episode, the speakers emphasize the importance of audience-centric communication and storytelling for organizations to stand out in a crowded online space. They argue that organizations need to shift their focus from talking about themselves to creating a connection with their audience. By incorporating storytelling into communication, organizations can effectively achieve this goal.

The speakers point out that constantly talking about oneself can be off-putting to the audience. Instead, they encourage organizations to invite their audience into a story and make them the hero. By doing so, organizations can forge a stronger connection with their audience, making them feel involved and acknowledged.

Regular and consistent communication is also highlighted as valuable. When organizations communicate regularly, it helps people feel included in the story and more likely to engage. By putting effort into communicating with their audience, organizations can show that they value their supporters and create a sense of reward and acknowledgment.

Furthermore, the speakers emphasize the importance of considering the audience's perspective in communication. They suggest that organizations should step outside their own viewpoint and think about how their audience can be more involved. By flipping the communication around and considering the audience's needs and interests, organizations can make a significant difference in their messaging.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of audience-centric communication and storytelling for organizations to stand out and create meaningful connections with their audience.

Regular and meaningful communication is essential for nonprofit organizations to create a sense of inclusion and reward for their supporters. By consistently communicating with their audience, nonprofits ensure that supporters do not forget about them and feel included in the organization's story. When the executive director or other representatives of the organization take the time to send messages, such as videos or updates, it shows that the organization values and appreciates its supporters. This, in turn, encourages supporters to continue putting effort into the organization.

While nonprofits may not provide personal or physical rewards to their supporters, the psychological reward of feeling acknowledged and making a difference is important. Supporters want to feel that their contributions are seen, felt, and acknowledged. Nonprofits can achieve this by providing regular updates on the impact of donations and showing supporters how their contributions have made a difference. This can be done through videos, social media updates, or creatively crafted graphics that highlight the organization's achievements.

By implementing regular and meaningful communication strategies, nonprofits can stand out from others that solely focus on asking for donations. Supporters are more likely to feel like they are part of a community when they receive updates and see the impact of their contributions. Nonprofits can also empower supporters to take action on their own by providing toolkits and resources that they can share on social media or use to address local ocean issues. By fostering a two-way dialogue and involving the community in spreading the organization's message, nonprofits can effectively communicate their mission and create a sense of inclusion and reward for their supporters.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1553_SciCommsNatalieGilson.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 11:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin shares his goals and plans for 2024. He discusses his mindset shift towards engagement rather than growth, and his plans to increase his reach through YouTube.

Andrew also mentions his intention to create video podcasts under a new name, Ocean Talk, and to produce more original content on various digital platforms. He also mentions his efforts to secure sponsors for the podcast and addresses the potential introduction of ads. Overall, Andrew emphasizes his passion for ocean conservation and his commitment to spreading the message and engaging with his audience.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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The host of the podcast, Andrew Lewin, is dedicated to spreading information on ocean conservation and science as part of his professional goals for 2024. He is passionate about raising awareness about the importance of protecting the ocean and is committed to making a difference. While acknowledging that podcasting requires significant time and effort, Andrew has found it to be his preferred medium for sharing his message. Having previously been involved in content creation through blogging and YouTube videos, he has seen growth and engagement with his audience, valuing the conversations and feedback he receives.

Andrew emphasizes that his focus is not on becoming the biggest podcast or gaining a massive following, but rather on engaging with his community and spreading the message of ocean conservation. To achieve this, he plans to participate more actively in his Facebook group, engage with others on social media platforms, and attend conferences to cover and share information. Additionally, Andrew intends to expand his reach by utilizing YouTube as a platform for his audio podcast, creating a separate video podcast series, and increasing his presence on YouTube and YouTube Music to reach a wider audience.

In addition to these efforts, Andrew plans to incorporate storytelling into his content creation, including the production of video documentaries and the creation of original content on various digital platforms. He also mentions his intention to incorporate sponsors and ads into his podcast episodes to support the cost of his hobby and potentially turn it into a full-time endeavor. However, he assures listeners that he will strive to provide valuable and beneficial products or services through these sponsorships.

Overall, Andrew's professional goals for 2024 revolve around spreading the message of ocean conservation, engaging with his community, expanding his reach, and creating meaningful content. He aims to achieve these goals through active participation in his Facebook group, increased engagement on social media platforms, the utilization of YouTube for both audio and video content, storytelling through documentaries and original content, and the incorporation of sponsors and ads to support his podcast.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1550_HTPTOIn2024.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of science communication and highlights a video by the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab. The video provides insight into the lab's research on great white sharks, their habitat, and their behavior.

Andrew emphasizes the need for more positive content about sharks and encourages other research labs to share their work through videos and other forms of media. He praises the Shark Lab's call to action and suggests that more videos like this can help dispel fears and increase understanding and appreciation for sharks.

Andrew also mentions the challenges of science communication and the importance of media training for researchers. He concludes by expressing his hope for the future of science communication and his plans to produce documentary videos.

Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ztvzjhdAEQ&t=682s

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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The California State University Long Beach Shark Lab has released a video titled "Shivers in the Shadows: The Shark Lab's Call to Action" to educate the public about their research on great white sharks. The video aims to dispel common misconceptions and fears about these apex predators while highlighting the importance of understanding and conserving them. Featuring interviews with lab members, including Dr. Chris Lowe, the video discusses their research methods, such as tagging and drone footage, to study the movements and behaviors of great whites, particularly juvenile sharks in Southern California. It emphasizes that interactions between great whites and humans are rare and accidental, with the sharks primarily preying on sea lions and fish. The video also showcases the lab's efforts in training students in media skills to effectively communicate their research to the public. The host of the podcast expresses support for the video and encourages other labs to produce similar content to promote understanding and appreciation for sharks.

The video produced by the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab aims to educate the public about the behavior and importance of great white sharks, reducing fear and promoting the conservation of these apex predators. It provides insights into the lab's research, including tracking the movements of juvenile great whites and studying their interactions with other marine species. Emphasizing that great whites pose minimal threat to humans and primarily focus on hunting sea lions and fish, the video dispels myths and provides accurate information to change public perceptions and foster a greater appreciation for these sharks. The lab's call to action is for viewers to understand and protect the important juvenile habitat in Southern California and support ongoing research efforts. Overall, the video serves as a powerful tool for science communication, highlighting the need for more positive and informative content about sharks.

Titled "Shivers in the Shadows: The Shark Lab's Call to Action," the video highlights the work of the Shark Lab at California State University Long Beach (CSULB). Serving as a documentary, it educates viewers about the lab's research and introduces the researchers involved in the project.

The video provides an overview of the lab's research on great white sharks, particularly in Southern California, emphasizing the importance of understanding these apex predators and dispelling misconceptions about their behavior. The researchers at the Shark Lab conduct various studies, including tagging sharks, monitoring their movements, and using drone footage to track their behavior.

Featuring Dr. Chris Lowe, the head of the Shark Lab, and other members of the lab, the video introduces viewers to the individuals involved in the research and allows them to share their perspectives and insights. The researchers discuss their motivations for studying sharks and the importance of communicating their findings to the public.

The video also highlights the lab's efforts in science communication and media training, emphasizing the importance of effectively communicating scientific research to the public and addressing common fears and misconceptions about sharks. By showcasing the researchers' expertise and passion, the video aims to encourage viewers to engage with the lab and learn more about sharks and marine conservation.

Overall, the video serves as a call to action for viewers to support the work of the Shark Lab and promote a better understanding and appreciation for great white sharks. It demonstrates the power of science communication and the importance of sharing research findings to dispel fears and promote conservation efforts.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1547_SharkLabYTVideo.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses how anyone can become the next Jacques Cousteau, Dr. Sylvia Earle, or Sir David Attenborough through the power of social media. He emphasizes the importance of publishing content on platforms like TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube to inspire and educate others about marine conservation. Andrew shares his own experience with podcasting and highlights the success of other individuals who have used social media to become influencers in the field. He also encourages listeners to find their authentic voice and develop a workflow that allows them to consistently publish content. The episode concludes with a reminder that everyone has the potential to make a difference in ocean conservation and that taking action is key.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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In this episode, the host emphasizes the power of social media in inspiring others and becoming influential voices for ocean conservation. They mention iconic figures like Sir David Attenborough, Jacques Cousteau, and Dr. Sylvia Earle, who have inspired many through their work in marine conservation. The host encourages listeners to recognize their potential to make a significant impact by utilizing today's technology and social media platforms.

The importance of publishing content on social media as a means of sharing one's passion for the ocean and raising awareness about conservation issues is highlighted. The host emphasizes that publishing doesn't have to be limited to academic papers, but can include personal experiences, stories, and insights related to marine biology and conservation. They mention platforms like TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube as opportunities for individuals to connect with audiences and showcase their creativity and knowledge about the ocean.

The concept of becoming an influencer in the digital age is also discussed. The host mentions the past "gatekeeping" where only a select few had access to platforms like television to reach a wide audience. However, with social media, there is now greater accessibility and the potential for anyone to become an influencer. Examples of individuals who have gained popularity and recognition through their social media presence, particularly on TikTok and Instagram, are provided.

The episode acknowledges that starting and maintaining a social media presence requires effort and consistency. The host encourages listeners to find their authentic voice and style of communication that resonates with their audience. They also emphasize the importance of developing a workflow and finding efficient ways to create and publish content.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that individuals to become influential voices for ocean conservation through social media. It encourages listeners to embrace the opportunities provided by technology and social media platforms to share their passion, inspire others, and make a positive impact on marine conservation.

In the podcast episode, the host emphasizes the importance of finding an authentic voice and style when communicating about the ocean. They explain that in today's digital age, there are numerous platforms available for sharing information and inspiring others, such as social media, podcasts, and videos. However, it is crucial to be true to oneself and communicate in a genuine and authentic manner.

The host mentions the many influencers and content creators on social media who have gained popularity by sharing their passion for the ocean. They highlight the example of a marine biologist who uses platforms like TikTok and Instagram to showcase her research on stingrays and engage with her audience. By being true to her own style and presenting her work in an engaging manner, she has become an inspiration to many.

The host also acknowledges the temptation to imitate others who have found success in their communication efforts. They mention a social media guru who has built a multi-million dollar company and has a large following. However, it is important to find one's own unique voice and not simply copy others. Authenticity is key in connecting with an audience and making a lasting impact.

Furthermore, the host acknowledges that finding an authentic voice and style may take time and experimentation. They reflect on their own journey with the podcast and how they had to adapt and change their approach over time. They encourage listeners to embrace the process and not be discouraged by the initial challenges. With persistence and a genuine passion for the subject matter, anyone can find their own voice and make a meaningful impact in ocean conservation.

In conclusion, the podcast episode emphasizes the importance of finding an authentic voice and style when communicating about the ocean. It encourages individuals to embrace the digital platforms available and share their passion in a way that feels genuine and true to themselves. By doing so, they can inspire others and make a positive impact in the field of ocean conservation.

In this episode, the host emphasizes the importance of developing a workflow and learning how to effectively publish content on social media to reach and engage with an audience. The host starts by discussing the power of social media and how it has eliminated the gatekeeping that used to exist in the world of influencers and content creators. With social media, anyone can become an influencer and share their passion and expertise with the world.

The host uses examples of successful marine biologists and conservationists who have used social media to become their own versions of famous figures like Sir David Attenborough and Jacques Cousteau. They highlight the case of a PhD student named Jalyn Myers, who films her work on stingrays and shares it on platforms like TikTok and Instagram. By doing so, she has gained a significant following and become an inspiration to others interested in marine biology.

The host also acknowledges that developing a successful social media presence takes time and effort. They mention their own experience of starting a podcast and the challenges they faced in the beginning. However, they emphasize that with consistency and a clear purpose, it is possible to build an audience and make a positive impact.

To help listeners get started, the host announces their plan to dedicate future episodes to discussing workflow and providing tips on how to effectively publish content on social media. They encourage listeners to find their own authentic voice and style, and to focus on what they can bring to the table rather than trying to copy others.

In conclusion, the episode highlights the importance of developing a workflow and learning how to effectively publish content on social media platforms. By doing so, individuals can reach and engage with their audience, inspire others, and make a meaningful impact in the field of marine biology and conservation.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1544_YouAreTheNewDavidAttenborough.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, host Andrew Luen explores the importance of science and conservation communication in changing behaviors to protect the ocean. He discusses the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday and the consumer frenzy of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, emphasizing the need to rethink our behavior and prioritize conservation.

Tune in to learn how we can speak up for the ocean and take action to create a better future for our planet.

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Bernie's company is actively making a positive impact on the world through various environmental and local projects. The podcast transcript highlights how Bernie's team is involved in environmental initiatives and reconciliation projects with indigenous groups, demonstrating their commitment to improving the environment and making a difference in the community. Moreover, the podcast emphasizes that Bernie's team genuinely enjoys their work, indicating that the company's focus on these projects has fostered a positive culture within the team. Overall, Bernie's company is effectively leveraging their business to contribute to environmental and community initiatives, showcasing their dedication to creating a positive impact on the world.

In this episode of the podcast, the host explores the crucial role of science communicators in promoting alternatives to harmful consumerism. The host specifically emphasizes the negative consequences of materialistic behaviors, particularly during events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday. They shed light on how the commercial aspect of these events encourages people to purchase products that may harm the environment or exploit those involved in their production.

The host suggests that science communicators have a responsibility to encourage individuals to consider alternatives to material goods. Instead of simply discouraging the purchase of consumer products or gifts, they should promote experiences such as family trips or volunteering for charities. By focusing on these alternatives, science communicators can help shift the perspective from materialistic consumption to more sustainable and meaningful actions.

The host acknowledges the challenge science communicators face in addressing these issues without sounding negative. They emphasize the importance of presenting alternatives in a positive light, rather than solely discouraging certain behaviors. Instead of saying "don't buy this because it affects the environment," science communicators should focus on suggesting actions that benefit the environment, such as choosing eco-friendly products or engaging in activities that promote conservation.

Overall, this episode highlights the significant role of science communicators in promoting alternatives to harmful consumerism. By encouraging individuals to think beyond material goods and consider more sustainable actions, science communicators can help protect the environment and drive positive change.

In the episode, the speaker underscores the importance of considering the environmental impact of our purchases and only acquiring what is truly necessary. They draw attention to the consumerism associated with events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday, where people are enticed to buy discounted items without fully considering the environmental consequences. The speaker questions whether the convenience of acquiring more stuff, particularly from large online retailers like Amazon, outweighs the negative impacts on the environment and local communities.

They suggest that as science communicators, it is crucial to discuss alternatives to the materialistic mindset that often surrounds these shopping events. They advocate for a shift in behavior and mindset, encouraging individuals to reflect on their true needs and support small businesses that contribute to local economies. The speaker argues that instead of focusing on accumulating more possessions and wealth, individuals should prioritize making a positive impact on the world and their communities.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the need for individuals to be mindful consumers, considering the environmental consequences of their purchases and making choices that align with their values and the well-being of the planet.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1532_SciCommSpeakingThePublicsLanguage.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of science communication in academia. He highlights the changing landscape of communication, including the rise of social media and digital channels. Lewin emphasizes the value of having good communication skills and investing time in science communication. He recalls how research used to receive coverage on traditional media platforms, such as TV shows and newspapers, and the impact it had on people's interest.

Tune in to learn more about how researchers can effectively share their work on university channels and advocate for a better ocean.

Link to article: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0290504#sec001

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The host of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast encourages listeners to engage with the show in various ways. He appreciates those who listen to every episode and invites them to provide comments and feedback on the podcast's content and performance. Additionally, he encourages listeners to connect with him on Instagram at How to Protect the Ocean. The host also requests that listeners leave a rating and review on popular podcast platforms like Apple Podcasts or Spotify. By actively participating in the podcast community through comments, feedback, and social media interaction, listeners can contribute to the growth of the show.

In one episode, the host emphasizes the significance of science communication within universities and urges researchers to dedicate more time to sharing their research. The host acknowledges the evolving landscape of science communication at universities and stresses the importance of researchers understanding its relevance. They highlight the need for researchers to possess strong communication skills and be willing to invest additional time in science communication. The host suggests that researchers can increase the visibility of their research by collaborating with their university's central communications office. They advise researchers not to wait for the university to promote their work, but rather to proactively develop a science communication strategy to publish their research through the university. The host also mentions that science communication can be a valuable learning experience for PhD, postdoc, and master's students, as it allows them to collaborate with the university's central communications office. Overall, the episode emphasizes the value of science communication for researchers within universities and encourages active engagement in sharing their research.

The host of the podcast emphasizes the importance of listeners leaving ratings and reviews on their preferred podcast platforms. They highlight how these ratings and reviews contribute to the organic growth of the podcast. By leaving positive ratings and reviews, listeners can help attract new audience members who are interested in similar topics, such as the ocean. The host also expresses appreciation for listener feedback and engagement, as it helps improve the podcast and provide valuable information. Alongside leaving ratings and reviews, listeners are encouraged to engage with the host on social media, particularly on Instagram at "How to Protect the Ocean." This demonstrates the host's value for interaction and communication with their audience.


In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of spreading awareness about ocean conservation and protection. He highlights the negative connotation surrounding these efforts and emphasizes the need to bring hope and optimism back into the conversation. Andrew discusses the role of communication in spreading awareness and instilling belief in the possibility of protecting the ocean. He concludes by exploring how to foster hope and optimism in our efforts to protect the ocean.

Tune in to learn more about the vital role of communication in ocean conservation.

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In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, the host emphasizes the importance of effectively communicating the need to protect the ocean in order to inspire hope and belief in the possibility of positive change. The host acknowledges the negative connotation surrounding ocean protection and conservation, and the lack of awareness about what needs to be done. Therefore, spreading awareness and increasing optimism is crucial.

The host draws a parallel between movies, particularly in sci-fi genres, where hope is a major theme. Characters rely on hope to overcome challenges, even in the face of the end of the world. Similarly, protecting the ocean requires optimism and hope. By effectively communicating the importance of ocean protection, individuals can regain their hope and believe that positive change is possible.

Science communication is highlighted as a key tool in spreading awareness about ocean protection. The host acknowledges that while talking about science communication is easy, implementing effective strategies can be challenging. However, it is emphasized that it starts with each individual. By taking action and actively engaging in science communication, individuals can contribute to spreading awareness and inspiring hope in others.

The episode concludes with a call to action, urging listeners to start their science communication journey right away. The host encourages individuals to seek help if needed and emphasizes the importance of taking action now. By starting the conversation and actively participating in science communication, individuals can play a role in protecting the ocean and promoting a more optimistic and hopeful outlook for the future.

The episode discusses the challenges of implementing effective science communication. The host acknowledges that while it is easy to talk about the importance of science communication and what needs to be done, actually implementing these strategies can be difficult. The host mentions that it is not easy to do and that it can be a struggle for many people.

One challenge mentioned is finding the right platform for science communication. The host suggests picking a digital platform, such as social media, videos, or podcasts, but acknowledges that it doesn't need to be perfect or great. The important thing is to start and be consistent, as improvement will come over time.

Another challenge mentioned is the fear or discomfort that some individuals may have when it comes to science communication. The host shares experiences of working with clients who initially struggled with podcasting but eventually became more comfortable with it. This highlights the need for individuals to overcome their fears and step out of their comfort zones in order to effectively communicate science.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that implementing effective science communication can be challenging, but it is important to start and take action. It encourages individuals to spread awareness, connect with their audience, and provide hope and optimism through their communication efforts.

In the episode, the host emphasizes the importance of having a drive to continuously improve and pivot in order to be more effective in ocean conservation efforts. The host acknowledges that implementing ocean conservation measures can be difficult and challenging. It requires time, effort, and a level of dedication that may not always be incentivized in our jobs or lives. However, the host emphasizes that this drive to protect the ocean is what fuels their passion and mission.

The host shares that they started the podcast because they wanted to stay connected and up-to-date with the latest news, projects, and people in the ocean conservation field. They recognized that finding a full-time job in ocean conservation was challenging, so they took it upon themselves to create a platform where they could continue to be involved and make a difference. This drive to stay engaged and informed demonstrates the host's commitment to continuously improving their understanding and impact in ocean conservation.

The host also highlights the need to be open to pivoting and adapting in order to be more effective in ocean conservation efforts. They mention the importance of shifting strategies when needed and being willing to embrace change. This flexibility and willingness to adapt is crucial in a field that is constantly evolving and facing new challenges.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that having a drive to continuously improve and pivot is essential in making a meaningful impact in ocean conservation. It requires dedication, perseverance, and a commitment to staying informed and adaptable. By continuously striving to be better and more effective, individuals can contribute to the protection and conservation of the ocean.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1523_HowToGetBetterAtScienceCommunication.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin tackles the challenge of communicating hope in the face of a changing climate. Despite the recent onslaught of natural disasters and extreme weather events, Lewin emphasizes the importance of maintaining hope and optimism for the future. He discusses the need for science and conservation communicators to convey messages of hope and explores how to convince people that there is hope in our climate future.

Tune in to learn more about the power of hope and how to speak up for the ocean.

Link mentioned in episode:
2) The Garbage Queen on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@thegarbagequeen
 
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The episode emphasizes the crucial role of science communicators and conservation communicators in instilling hope and creating a better future for the planet. Andrew acknowledges the challenges and difficulties faced in the climate crisis, but emphasizes the importance of continuing to spread messages of hope and optimism. He highlights that hope can be found in various forms, such as in movies and through the concept of "ocean optimism." Andrew suggests that hope is the answer to addressing the climate crisis and emphasizes the need for effective communication of this hope. It is mentioned that articles and individuals like the "Garbage Queen" can play a significant role in moving things forward and solidifying a better future. Andrew firmly believes that with collective efforts and the involvement of people from all walks of life, a better future for the planet is possible. The episode encourages listeners to actively engage in conversations about climate hope and science communication, emphasizing the importance of sharing thoughts and ideas to foster positive change.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1514_ClimateHope.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of accurate science communication. He emphasizes the need for researchers to ensure their facts are correct and to access scientific literature for accurate information. Andrew admits to occasionally falling for rumors or unproven theories but emphasizes the importance of correcting any inaccuracies. The episode focuses on speaking up for the ocean and taking action to protect it.

Tune in to learn more about the significance of accurate science communication in advocating for the ocean.

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In this episode, Andrew emphasizes the crucial role of science communicators in providing valuable information to their audience. He stresses the importance of having a solid background knowledge and expertise in the subject matter when engaging in science communication through various platforms such as digital media, educational pieces, or classroom volunteering.

Andrew highlights the challenge of not always having immediate access to digital information when communicating with a live audience or in a classroom setting. In such situations, science communicators must rely on their own knowledge and expertise to ensure the accuracy of the information they provide. If they encounter a question they cannot answer, it is acceptable to respond with "I'll get back to you" and follow up later.

Andrew emphasizes the need for science communicators to conduct thorough research and ensure the accuracy of the information they share. They emphasize the importance of relying on verified facts and avoiding rumors or unproven theories. Science communicators should strive to provide the most up-to-date and reliable information available.

Overall, this episode underscores the responsibility of science communicators to bring value to their audience by providing accurate and reliable information. It emphasizes the importance of having strong background knowledge, conducting thorough research, and maintaining integrity in science communication.

When communicating with a live audience, science communicators must be well-prepared and knowledgeable, especially when quick access to information is not available. This is particularly important in situations where digital platforms are not accessible for immediate information retrieval. In such cases, science communicators must confidently address the topic at hand and possess a solid background knowledge. They should be able to respond to audience questions with accurate information. If uncertain about an answer, it is acceptable to say, "I'll get back to you" and follow up later. However, it is ideal to conduct thorough research beforehand and be well-versed in the specific topic being discussed, as well as related topics. By being well-prepared, science communicators can ensure the provision of accurate information to their audience and maintain the integrity of their communication.

In this episode, Andrew emphasizes the importance of honesty and transparency when communicating information, particularly in the field of science. They highlight the acceptability of responding with "I don't know" if one does not have the answer to a question. Instead of fabricating an answer or speculating, it is better to promise to provide the audience with the correct information later. This approach demonstrates integrity and ensures the sharing of accurate information. The host also emphasizes the significance of conducting thorough research and possessing a strong background knowledge of the topic being discussed, especially when speaking in front of a live audience or classroom where quick access to information may not be feasible. By admitting when one does not know something and committing to finding the answer, credibility can be maintained, and accurate information can be provided to the audience.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1511_WhyScienceIsSoComplextToCommunicate.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of podcasting for organizations in environmental and marine science and conservation. He emphasizes the power of podcasting as a mode of communication to reach a wide audience and promote action for the ocean. Andrew highlights the longevity and impact of podcasting, and encourages listeners to take advantage of this underappreciated platform.

If you or your organization is interested in launching a podcast for your organization, please contact me to discuss the next steps: https://www.speakupforblue.com/contact/

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1502_WhyYourConservationOrganizationNeedsAPodcast.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses a strategy that nonprofit organizations in the ocean science and conservation field should adopt to gain more attention and support from viewers. He emphasizes the importance of effective communication and shares his experience in digital communication and building a loyal audience. Tune in to learn how to speak up for the ocean and take action for a better future.

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In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of funding for conservation and science-related projects. He explores various ways to obtain funding, such as self-funding, selling products and services, and gaining attention on social media or TV. The host highlights two organizations that have successfully garnered attention through their appearances on Shark Week, ultimately helping to fund their projects. He emphasizes the significance of attracting attention and securing funding to support ocean conservation efforts. Tune in to learn more about how individuals and organizations can make a name for themselves and attract attention, eyes, and money to their work.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1490_WorkingInTVToGetAttentionOnYourResearch1.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of authenticity and staying true to oneself as a science communicator. He shares a cautionary tale about an influencer on social media who faced backlash for not being true to herself. Andrew emphasizes the need for content creators to be authentic and genuine in their online presence, especially when advocating for the ocean. He encourages listeners to speak up for the ocean and offers advice for aspiring content creators. Tune in to learn more about the power of staying true to yourself in science communication.

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1481_InfluencerCaughtScammingBeachCleanUp.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, the host explores the importance of in-person conversations and two-way communication in the world of content creation. The guest, Paola Espitia, shares her experience in science communication and building a career in interacting with people on cruise lines. The conversation sparks a desire in Andrew to find ways to engage with listeners in person and have more interactive discussions. Tune in to discover the value of face-to-face interactions in building relationships and gaining immediate feedback.

Paola Espitia of @olapicreative is making media that moves. After almost two decades of coral research, Paola realized she could make a bigger impact on the ocean by using her voice, so she became a Speaker at Sea aboard world-class cruise lines including Lindblad Expeditions’ National Geographic fleet. To further advance ocean conservation initiatives, Paola co-founded the media agency, Ola’pi Creative with her husband. During this Ocean Decade, Ola’pi Creative is committed to helping 1,000 emergent ocean leaders with messaging, media production, and marketing to create a ripple effect that inspires action for the ocean we want.

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1475_FindingNewAudiencesPaola.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

The Importance of Branding in Science Communication
Branding plays a crucial role in science communication as it helps creators convey their mission, vision, and the reasons behind their content creation. A well-defined brand facilitates the connection between the audience and the creator, enabling the delivery of meaningful and impactful messages. It's essential to understand the marketing and branding side of science communication while creating content on various platforms, such as TikTok, YouTube, and Instagram, to improve engagement and reach. I discuss my initial fear of the term branding. However, I realized that I already had a brand, and that brand is how I communicate my vision through content creation. I acknowledge the recent growth in science communication and stress the importance of finding a balance between content creation and branding to build a stronger community and maintain audience engagement.

How to Incorporate Branding in Your Content
Incorporating branding into your content involves being strategic with your marketing and communication efforts. Ensure that every piece of content represents your mission, vision, and core values while consistently providing valuable information to the audience. It's vital to consider audience feedback, adapt content as needed, and be authentic while creating and delivering brand messages. I talk about the importance of reinforcing your brand's message and reminding yourself of why you create content. I challenge myself by questioning if my podcast will benefit the audience and provide value. By staying aligned with my branding strategy, I deliver meaningful content while keeping the essence of my brand intact. Ultimately, branding helps to maintain the creator's focus on delivering quality content that aligns with their vision.

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1469_WhatIsYourScienceCommunicationBranding_2.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

I did a search on the web for any type of content with a topic surrounding communication for ocean conservation and I found videos, papers, and blog posts on how scientists think science communication needs to be conducted using scientific facts. But is that what audiences want to hear? Are they interested in learning about the facts? I propose that we have to find new ways to talk about the ocean that is fun and provides real ways to change the ocean.
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 


There are often times that I look at the news and hear the disasters that are happening all over the world and in my own backyard, I get overwhelmed and doubt whether we are going to be able to protect the oceans and ourselves from Climate Change. But I take comfort in the fact that there are people all over the world who are working together to protect their piece of ocean/planet. Therefore, in this episode, I will discuss how I think that we can build resilience locally to help globally.
 
Sign up to find out about the audio Ocean Conservation Careers members group:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

Direct download: SUFB_S1356_CommunicateLocallyToLeadToGlobalAction1.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

I recently had the opportunity to interview wildlife science communicator, Forrest Galante, for my other podcast I cohost called Beyond Jaws and during the interview Forrest taught me a lot about being a science communicator through his own journey. Therefore, I am going to share some interesting tips that I picked up from Forrest that I will use as a science communicator and that you could use in your own journey.
  1. Share your passion
  2. Be persistent
  3. Do good
  4. Haters going to hate and there is nothing you could do about it

Beyond Jaws Podcast: https://bit.ly/37TMqeK

Sign up to find out about the audio Ocean Conservation Careers members group:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

Direct download: SUFB_S1331_LessonsInSciCommFromForrestGalante.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Last episode (Episode 1223), I spoke to Virginia Schutte and Bethann Merkel about their approach to Science Communication that they discuss on their new podcast called Meteor. 

During the interview, I talked about how I just launched Speak Up For The Ocean Blue with minimal planning because I just wanted to start doing the "fun part" of my SciComm. I now realize that I would do things differently if I were to start over today.

I talk about 8 steps I would take if I was going to launch a Sci Comm platform today. 

Connect with Virginia and Bethann:
Website: https://meteorscicomm.org/
Podcast: https://meteorscicomm.org/podcast/
You can find the podcast on your favourite podcast app. 

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://www.speakupforblue.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/speakupforblue

 

Direct download: SUFB_S1223_WhatIWouldDoIfIStartedToSciCommToday.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

I had an audience member reach out to me this morning to ask me some advice about creating content for Science Communication (SciComm). I love chatting about SciComm so we had a great discussion. 

Listen to the episode on what my advice was for her. I think it might help you if you are looking to create SciComm content yourself.

Crystal's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ocean.bodhi/

Check out all of our episodes on www.speakupforblue.com

Want To Talk Oceans? Join the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/

Speak Up For Blue Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpeakUpforBlue

Direct download: SUFB_S1175_KnowThisWhenYouSciComm.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 8:53pm EDT

Eden Robins and Dr. Craig McClain join me on today's episode to talk about why they started a podcast to make boring science things not so boring with their new podcast.

It's funny, it's witty, it's actually quite informative as it dives into science to make things like lichens and the Kreb's Cycle exciting. 

Follow the podcast here:
Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/no-such-thing-as-boring/id1566049669Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1WxUiisgFOX9awi8ns4DCs?si=46WLZzoKTmKQm0pAmWX_Iw

Want To Talk Oceans? Join the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/

Speak Up For Blue Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpeakUpforBlue

 

Direct download: SUFB_S1166_NoSuchThingAsBoringPodcast.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

As the past couple of episodes have dealt with the topics of colonialism in Marine Science and Conservation, they got me thinking about how we could begin to be more inclusive. Obviously, inclusion and equity cannot be solved overnight and I am constantly learning about how colonialism and social justice issues are affecting various communities on a daily basis. 

However, as a Science Communicator, I started to think about my podcasts and the other podcasts within the Speak Up For Blue Podcast Network and how we can become more inclusive and diverse in the voices that I heard. I also thought about the lack of diversity in the voices on conservation documentaries. 

If we are going to become more inclusive and better at conservation, we need to hear from a more diverse set of science communicators. 

Who is your favourite Science Communicator? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakupforblue/

Speak Up For Blue Twitter: https://twitter.com/SpeakUpforBlue

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

Madame Curiosity
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2xUlSax
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2V38QQ1

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz

Ocean Science Radio
Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3chJMfA
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3bnkP18

The Guide To Mindful Conservation: Dancing In Pink Hiking Boots:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/31P4UY6
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3f7hDJw


Often times, science communicators are trying to undo the damage caused by a documentary or a certain President that spews utter garbage that is wrong on a specific environmental subject. 

Science communicators need to work at getting ahead of specific subject matters to ensure that the proper information backed by scientific evidence gets out to the public before other people manipulate the science in order to prove their point.

Would you consider podcasting? Share whether you would or not in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Or you can email me at andrew@speakupforblue.com

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz


I had a thought about science communication the other day. I noticed that it's always the same people that speak up for conservation. The people who speak up are great, but it's always the same people. I feel as though we need new people to start speaking out. 

Great Thunberg is relatively new to the game and she has done a great job in speaking up for doing something about Climate Change.

In January 2020, I will focus more on helping people to Speak Up For The Ocean Blue. This includes teaching an online course for Duke University on podcasting for environmental science. If you or the organization you are working for are interested, then sign up here: http://www.speakupforblue.com/duke.

Are you ready to Speak Up For The Ocean Blue? Share what you want to do in the Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz

Direct download: SUFB_S937_WeNeedYouToSpeakUpForTheOceanBlue.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

We had a slight problem that we never encountered here on the Speak Up For Blue Team: We were asked to take down an episode because our guest's boss was worried that the information that was discussed briefly on an episode was going to affect the future funding from a grantor. 

We didn't agree with the boss, but we didn't want our guests to be put in a more difficult position than they were already in. 

The Speak Up For Blue Team (with 7 podcasts) has communicated a lot of science, but we encounter barriers from time to time. 

In this episode, I give you some ways to overcome those barriers and give reasons why there shouldn't be any barriers at all.

Do you encounter barriers to Science Communication often? Share your experiences in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

NEW PODCAST ADDED TO THE NETWORK:

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Direct download: SUFB_S934_BarriersToScienceCommunication.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

I have the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Andrew Thaler on the podcast today to discuss his take on the Evolution of Social Media for Environmental Communications. We talk about his high hopes for Social Media in the past and his "Battleground" outlook for it in 2019. 

Andrew will be teaching a Course on Social Media For Environmental Communications for the 7th year to help Non-profits, NGOs, and government agencies to run effective social media campaigns. You won't learn about Social Media anywhere else but during this course.

Register for the Course TODAY before the price goes up tomorrow:

https://sites.nicholas.duke.edu/execed/social-media-for-environmental-communications/

Dr. Andrew Thaler Links:

Southern Fried Science: http://www.southernfriedscience.com/

Andrew's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rz0wBYNSJOQ

Andrew's Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAndrewThaler

Join our Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

 

Direct download: SUFB_S899_SocialMediaForEnvironmentalCommunications.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

A researcher named Victoria Herrman does most of her work in the Arctic. She wrote an article in the Guardian regarding her government citations that were disappearing. This is a HUGE issue that many scientists from around the world were hoping wouldn't happen...but here we are. 

What do you think we should do about getting access to these documents back? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to be more eco-friendly? Buy certified eco-friendly products from our affiliate partner the Grove Collaborative: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter


I had the pleasure of interviewing James Nikitine for this episode. James is a Marine Conservationist with a specialization in Marine Policy and Science Communication. 

James and I discuss how he got to where he is today and what his production company, Manaia Productions, is going to do for marine conservation. He also discusses his recent move with the family to New Zealand and how this will help his business and Marine Conservation.

Links for James Nikitine:

Manaia Productions: http://manaiaproductions.com/

James On Twitter: https://twitter.com/jamesnikitine

James On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesnikitine/

What form of Science Communication do you prefer the most? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter


Marine Science Communication has to be done properly to gain trust of your audience and inspire them to do more for the Ocean.

I talk about an example where Marine Conservation communication was misleading and could cause damage to the efforts of Conservation.

Listen to the episode to find out how you can make better strides in Ocean Conservation.

Enjoy the Podcast!!!

Let me know what you think of the episode by joining our Facebook Group for the Podcast.

Support Speak Up For Blue's Efforts to build a platform to raise awareness for Marine Science and Conservation and help you live for a better Ocean. Contribute to our Patreon Campaign

 

Direct download: SUFB_S348_OceanTalkFriday.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 9:04am EDT

Ocean Science and Conservation Communication is more important now more than ever as the oceans, and environment in general, are changing at a rapid rate and government are slow to act. Communication allows the right information to get in front of the public so that they can make more informed decisions on how to live for a better Ocean. But how do you get in front of the public in this day and age?

 

Allison Randolph, aka Ocean Allison, specializes in Ocean Science and Conservation Communication (has experience with podcasting, video documentaries and public speaking) and stops by the podcast to tell us how she got involved in the field and how you can communicate science effectively to make a difference.  

Enjoy the podcast!

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

Direct download: SUFB_S269_OceanScienceCommunicationWithAllisonRandolph.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

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