How To Protect The Ocean

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S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses marine protected areas (MPAs) and their importance in preserving the ocean. He explores the concept of designing MPAs for both representative and distinctive areas, highlighting the need to protect not only expected habitats but also unique ecosystems like upwellings and gyres. The episode also touches on the goal of protecting 30% of land and ocean by 2030 and the role of MPAs in addressing climate change.

Tune in to learn more about the evolving approach to designing MPAs and how they contribute to a better ocean.

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
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The episode highlights the significance of protecting 30% of the ocean by 2030 as part of the decade of the ocean. It emphasizes that all countries committed to this goal should have 30% of their exclusive economic zone safeguarded by the end of the decade. The episode stresses the need to protect the right areas for the right reasons, taking into account climate change and its impacts when designing marine protected areas (MPAs). It argues for prioritizing MPAs with higher resilience to climate change to ensure long-term protection. The episode also emphasizes the importance of proactive measures in safeguarding these areas, rather than reactive responses to climate change. It acknowledges the cost and resources required for designing and implementing MPAs, urging governments to allocate sufficient funding for their establishment. The episode concludes by urging listeners to share it with others who could benefit from learning about marine protected areas and emphasizes the urgency of meeting the 30% protection target by 2030.

According to the episode, marine protected areas (MPAs) are effective in environmental protection when properly designated and managed. The host mentions that MPAs can regulate fishing and prohibit extractive activities within their boundaries, safeguarding biodiversity and commercially viable fishery species. The effectiveness of MPAs has been documented in peer-reviewed journals. However, it is crucial to ensure proper management to prevent any extractive activities. The episode also highlights that MPAs are a significant tool in ocean conservation and can be planned similarly to land areas. The traditional approach to designating MPAs has evolved, with a focus on selecting areas that meet biodiversity criteria, including genetic diversity, species populations, and habitat diversity. The episode also mentions the importance of considering the impacts of climate change on MPAs and conducting further research to identify the best areas for future protection.

The episode encourages listeners to share it with others who would benefit from learning about marine protected areas. The host emphasizes that marine protected areas are an important tool in the conservation of the ocean and can be used to plan the ocean, just as we plan on land. The host also underscores the need to intensify efforts in protecting marine protected areas, given their cost and time-consuming nature. By sharing the episode, listeners can help raise awareness about the importance of marine protected areas and inspire others to take action in protecting and conserving the ocean.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1522_MPAForClimateChange.mp3
Category:Marine Protected Area -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Andrew interviews Travis, the owner of Bodhi Surf & Yoga Camp in Costa Rica. They discuss the importance of sustainable tourism and how Travis incorporates environmental considerations and learning about the local community into his business model. Travis shares his philosophy of giving back to Mother Ocean and emphasizes the need to give more than we take. This insightful conversation highlights the intersection of business and environmental responsibility in the tourism industry.

Connect with Bodhi Surf & Yoga:
Website: https://www.bodhisurfyoga.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/bodhisurfschool
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bodhisurfyoga/
Trip Advisor: https://www.tripadvisor.com.ph/Hotel_Review-g635755-d12272637-Reviews-Bodhi_Surf_Yoga_Camp-Uvita_Province_of_Puntarenas.html

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

The podcast episode delves into the significance of giving and receiving, particularly in relation to the ocean and nature. The host and guest engage in a discussion about how humans often take from the ocean and nature without giving back, emphasizing the need for a shift in mindset towards greater giving. They highlight the ocean's continuous generosity, providing us with smiles, tears, oxygen, and food, among other things. The episode stresses the importance of humans reciprocating this generosity by appreciating and protecting the ocean and nature.

Additionally, the episode touches on the concept of generosity within their surfing curriculum, where surfers are taught not only the skills and knowledge to surf safely but also the importance of giving back to the ocean and the community. Furthermore, the episode briefly mentions the significance of incorporating the principles and values of yoga into one's life beyond just physical exercise, taking the practice off the mat. Overall, the episode underscores the importance of giving and receiving in maintaining a harmonious relationship with the ocean and nature.

In the episode, the hosts explore the deeper philosophy of yoga, going beyond its physical exercise aspect that is often marketed and sold in the Western world. They emphasize the importance of understanding the values and principles of the eight limbs of yoga and applying them to one's life beyond the mat. The hosts note that their approach to yoga differs from many resorts in Costa Rica, where yoga teachers are typically foreigners.

However, they consider themselves fortunate as the wife, a Costa Rican native and yoga teacher, has traveled extensively to learn about yoga philosophy. This allows her to infuse a unique Costa Rican spirit and touch into the yoga practice, creating a deeper and more authentic experience. The hosts also highlight how yoga sessions foster a sense of connection and community among participants, enabling them to feel more connected to those around them. Overall, the hosts emphasize the importance of embracing the deeper philosophy of yoga and integrating it into one's life beyond the physical aspect.

The episode emphasizes the transformative power of yoga in cultivating connections and a sense of community among individuals. The speaker notes that while traveling to a foreign country may not involve interacting with many people, practicing yoga together can create a strong bond and a feeling of connection. The speaker personally feels more connected to those they have practiced yoga with, attributing this sense of connection to the adrenaline rush and positive feelings experienced during and after a yoga session.

Furthermore, the episode highlights the benefits of practicing yoga in a beautiful location like Costa Rica. The speaker describes it as an incredible way to experience life for a week or two. The serene environment of such a scenic place, combined with the practice of yoga, enhances the overall experience. The speaker also emphasizes that their wife, a yoga teacher, possesses a deep understanding of yoga philosophy and incorporates her Costa Rican spirit and touch into her teachings. This unique blend of yoga philosophy and the tropical setting of Costa Rica offers participants a more immersive and enriching experience.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1521_BhodiSurfAndYoga1.mp3
Category:B Corp -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this podcast episode, the topic of orcas and underwater noise is explored. Andrew Lewin = expresses excitement about discussing this often overlooked issue and introduces Rachel Aronson, the Executive Director of the Quiet Sound program. They highlight the program's goal of protecting endangered southern resident killer whales from the impact of commercial vessels. The decision to establish Quiet Sound as a collaborative effort within Washington Maritime Blue is explained. The episode also touches on the Orca Task Force and its role in addressing the population decline of southern resident killer whales.

Connect with Quiet Sound:
Website: https://quietsound.org/

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

In the episode, the speaker discusses the importance of recognizing when a conflict is ripe for mediation and the significance of considering the parties' readiness and alternatives to a negotiated agreement. They mention that not every conflict is ready for mediation and highlight the concept of the "ripeness moment," which refers to the point when people are emotionally and mentally prepared to engage in the mediation process.

The speaker emphasizes the need to assess the readiness and willingness of the parties to participate in mediation. This involves gauging their level of commitment, openness to dialogue, and willingness to explore potential solutions. Without the ripeness moment, mediation may be unproductive or even detrimental to the resolution of the conflict.

Additionally, the episode introduces the concept of the Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement (BATNA) in mediation. BATNA refers to the alternative course of action that parties will pursue if the mediation process does not lead to a satisfactory agreement. The speaker stresses the importance of coaching the parties in thinking through their BATNA, as it helps them evaluate the potential outcomes and consequences of not reaching an agreement through mediation.

The episode also highlights the significance of taking emotions out of conflicts and finding ways to work together in the future. The speakers emphasize the importance of living in hope that a resolution can be reached and relationships can be rebuilt, rather than resorting to mudslinging and losing trust. This approach requires empathy for all stakeholders involved.

To illustrate these points, the speakers provide an example of conflicts between the government and the fishing community. They emphasize the need for empathy towards the fishing community, who are trying to make a living, while also finding a balance that allows both parties to achieve their goals - the fishing community can sustain their livelihoods and the environment can be protected. This requires understanding and cooperation from all sides.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of recognizing the ripeness moment for mediation, considering alternatives, and approaching conflicts with empathy and a focus on future collaboration.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1520_OrcasAndUnderwaterNoise2.mp3
Category:Orca -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This episode of the podcast delves into the topic of striving for perfection in marine science and conservation. The host reflects on their own journey and the challenges faced in pursuing a career in this field. The episode also addresses personal reflection and the need to reassess goals and directions in life. The host shares a personal experience of losing their father and how it has influenced their perspective on life and their professional choices. Despite the somber tone, the episode ultimately reinforces the importance of the podcast as an effective means of communication and advocacy for ocean conservation.

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1519_StriveToPerfection.mp3
Category:Inspiration -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

The summer was tough on corals due to bleaching caused by high ocean temperatures. However, a researcher in Florida is trying to help by using crabs to eat the algae that cover the corals and hinder their growth. This ambitious plan involves breeding a quarter of a million Caribbean king crabs each year.

Link to article: https://www.vox.com/down-to-earth/2023/9/27/23883039/florida-coral-reef-caribbean-king-crabs-restoration

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

The summer presented significant challenges for corals as they experienced widespread bleaching events caused by high ocean temperatures. In Florida waters, temperatures soared above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, leading to extensive coral bleaching. Coral bleaching occurs when corals expel the algae, known as zoanthellae, that reside within their tissues. These algae are vital for the growth and survival of corals as they provide them with food through photosynthesis. When the algae leave the coral skeleton, the corals lose their color and become bleached, appearing white. Prolonged bleaching can ultimately result in the death of corals.

Coral reefs play a crucial role in the ecosystem by providing essential habitats for fish, protecting shorelines, and serving as a food source for fishers. Protecting coral reefs is vital for our survival in numerous ways. However, the escalating impacts of climate change pose a significant threat to coral reefs worldwide. Climate change, with its rising sea surface temperatures, is causing more frequent and severe bleaching events. This trend is deeply concerning as corals require optimal conditions to grow and thrive. If corals are unable to grow, critical habitats will be lost, leading to dire consequences.

While individuals may feel limited in their ability to directly address climate change and its impacts on corals, there are still actions that can be taken to help protect and support these vulnerable ecosystems. Researchers suggest that reducing other stressors on corals, such as improving water quality and minimizing coastal development, can have a positive impact. High nutrient waters and sedimentation can harm corals by blocking sunlight and inhibiting their growth. By taking steps to minimize these stressors, individuals can contribute to the overall health and resilience of coral reefs.

In the episode, Dr. Jason Spadaro, a researcher at Moat Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in the Florida Keys, is leading an ambitious plan to breed a quarter of a million Caribbean king crabs each year. The purpose of breeding these crabs is not for seafood consumption, but rather to help coral reefs survive by consuming algae.

Corals are photosynthetic and symbiotic animals that rely on a type of algae called zooxanthellae to reside within their skeleton. However, when algae overgrows the corals, it blocks their access to sunlight, ultimately leading to their demise. This is where the crabs come in. Research conducted by Dr. Spadaro revealed that reefs with crabs had approximately 85% less algae compared to reefs without crabs. The crabs consume the algae, which aids the corals by removing the algae that covers them and inhibits their growth.

The need for crabs to consume algae is particularly crucial due to the challenges faced by coral reefs, such as high sea surface temperatures and nutrient pollution, which promote algae growth. Additionally, overfishing of herbivorous fish and diseases affecting urchins have resulted in a decline in the number of animals that naturally consume algae on the reefs. This lack of algae-eating animals has created an imbalance where the algae is not being sufficiently controlled.

To address this issue, Dr. Spadaro is working on introducing Caribbean king crabs to the Florida Key Reefs. He has established breeding facilities in both Sarasota, Florida, and the Florida Keys, with approximately 100 crabs in the Keys and 200 in Sarasota. By breeding and releasing these crabs into the reefs, he aims to increase the number of algae-consuming animals and help maintain a healthy balance between corals and algae.

The host of the podcast is currently recording the episode at his parents' house to assist in taking care of them. He explains that his mom has recently contracted COVID and is isolating in the basement, while his dad is immunocompromised. The host is staying with his parents to ensure his dad remains as healthy as possible and to provide assistance during this time. This personal situation has resulted in the host recording the episode late at night on a Thursday to ensure that the episodes can still be published on time.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1518_HelpingCoralWithCrabs.mp3
Category:Coral Reef -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of effective communication when it comes to research papers that make drastic headlines. He highlights a recent research paper that predicted the halt of a crucial circulation in the Atlantic, causing catastrophic global consequences. However, a new paper contradicts this prediction, suggesting that such an event is unlikely to occur in the foreseeable future. Andrew emphasizes the need for clear and accurate communication to avoid misleading or alarming the public.

Tune in to learn more about the significance of speaking up for the ocean and taking action to protect it.

Link to article: https://theconversation.com/the-atlantic-oceans-major-current-system-is-slowing-down-but-a-21st-century-collapse-is-unlikely-214647

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

Within the episode, Andrew explores how podcasts offer a unique platform for in-depth discussions and a deeper understanding of topics compared to other mediums such as blog posts or videos. They emphasize that within a concise 15-minute timeframe, they can effectively convey a wealth of information about a topic's history, related papers, and surrounding controversies. By avoiding misleading headlines, podcasts contribute to responsible journalism.

Moreover, Andrew highlights the ability of podcasts to delve deeper into a subject by featuring interviews with experts or individuals directly involved in the topic. He even contemplated the possibility of interviewing oceanographers who conducted the research papers or facilitating debates between different perspectives. This capacity for conversation and insights from experts fosters meaningful discussions and enhances understanding.

Furthermore, Andrew acknowledges that podcasts, along with video podcasts and blog posts, possess the advantage of conveying the speaker's passion and tone. Listeners can directly hear from scientists and researchers, gaining a sense of their thoughts and emotions towards the science and their own work. This audio aspect of podcasts enhances the overall experience and engagement with the content.

In conclusion, this episode highlights how podcasts provide a platform for more in-depth discussions, expert interviews, and a better understanding of topics compared to other mediums like blog posts or videos.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1517_AMOCCommunication.mp3
Category:SciComm -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew is joined by Brendon Pasisi and Mael Imirizaldu to discuss ocean conservation commitments. They dive into the Blue Nature Alliance and its importance in empowering conservation efforts. Brendon introduces the concept of Ocean Conservation Commitments and how government, businesses, organizations, communities, and individuals can support Marine Protected Area efforts in the Nuie Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).

Tune in to learn more about their work and the exciting initiatives they are undertaking to protect our oceans.

Support Ocean Conservation Commitments: https://www.speakupforblue.com/occ

Episode with Mael: https://www.speakupforblue.com/show/speak-up-for-the-ocean-blue/sufb-1205-social-equity-in-and-through/

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In this episode, the speakers delve into the topic of how technology has revolutionized the ability of individuals to express their opinions and create content. They highlight the past dominance of broadcasting networks like Fox, CBC, CNN, and CBS as the primary platforms for documentaries and radio programs, limiting access to those within these networks. However, the emergence of podcasting and YouTube has democratized content creation, allowing anyone to share their perspectives and opinions. This shift has resulted in a more diverse range of voices being heard.

While acknowledging the benefits of this democratization, the speakers also address its drawbacks. They acknowledge that not all opinions expressed may serve the greater good. Nevertheless, they maintain an overall positive outlook on the ability for everyone to have a platform to share their thoughts and ideas.

Furthermore, the speakers explore how technology has facilitated direct support for creators and projects. They highlight platforms like Patreon, which enable individuals to financially support specific creators, as well as charitable foundations that allow contributions to projects outside of larger charitable organizations. This direct support has provided independent creators with increased opportunities and resources to continue their work.

Overall, this episode underscores how technology has democratized the ability for people to express their opinions and create content. It has opened up new avenues for sharing ideas and has empowered individuals to directly support creators and projects.

In this episode, the speaker emphasizes the importance of implementing conservation measures to prevent the overuse of natural resources and protect the environment. They acknowledge that human nature, driven by the desire for a more Western standard of living, has placed increased pressure on the environment. Technological advancements have enabled humans to exploit natural resources more extensively, necessitating the need for conservation measures.

The speaker highlights the existence of customary practices and traditions that demonstrate respect for the environment and resource provision. For instance, they mention the placement of tupples in certain areas of the ocean or sea, effectively prohibiting access for up to a year. This exemplifies a recognition of the need to limit human impact on the environment.

However, the speaker also acknowledges that conservation measures are now more critical than ever due to factors such as climate change. They emphasize the importance of incorporating resilience into environmental management to ensure the sustainability of natural resources. By implementing conservation measures, it is possible to prevent resource overuse and safeguard the environment for future generations.

The episode also discusses the role of individuals in supporting conservation efforts. While voting for governments that prioritize conservation is important, the speaker recognizes that this choice may be limited in certain circumstances. However, individuals have the power to contribute to conservation through personal choices, such as donating money to organizations and governments dedicated to protecting the environment. This sense of personal control and contribution instills hope and a sense of purpose in individuals striving to preserve the ocean.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the necessity of conservation measures to prevent the overuse of natural resources and protect the environment. It highlights the role of individuals and governments in supporting and implementing these measures, ultimately working towards a sustainable future.

In this episode, the importance of building sustainable economic development in the blue economy, particularly through tourism, is mentioned. However, the speaker emphasizes the need for this development to be carried out in a manner that avoids negative impacts on marine resources and the environment. They stress the significance of supporting a sustainable level of tourism that does not lead to increased exploitation of marine resources. It is crucial to avoid overharvesting and ensure that the number of visitors does not have a detrimental effect on the environment.

The speaker also emphasizes the uniqueness of the location and the importance of preserving its natural beauty and resources. There is a clear recognition of the potential negative consequences of unsustainable tourism and a strong desire to protect the marine environment.

Additionally, the episode discusses the impact of COVID-19 on tourism and the necessity of finding innovative ways to support economic development in the blue economy. The previous model of sustainable financing, reliant on tourism fees, was greatly affected by the lack of tourists during the pandemic. This highlights the importance of exploring alternative methods of support that do not solely rely on tourism.

Overall, the episode suggests that while economic development in the blue economy, particularly through tourism, is important, it should be approached with sustainability in mind to avoid negative impacts on marine resources and the environment.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1516_OceanConservationCommitments.mp3
Category:Ocean Conservation Commitments -- posted at: 7:20pm EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Andrew and Jen Dianto Kemmerly from the Monterey Bay Aquarium discuss the Seafood Watch program. Jenn, the Vice President of Global Ocean Conservation, shares her journey to working with the program and the importance of making informed choices when it comes to seafood. They discuss the challenges of finding sustainable seafood and how the Seafood Watch app helps consumers make better choices.

Tune in to learn more about the Seafood Watch program and how it is helping to protect the ocean.

Seafood Watch: https://www.seafoodwatch.org/

The podcast episode emphasizes the importance of sustainability in the fishing industry and highlights how individuals can play a role in promoting sustainability by asking for sustainable seafood options. Andrew Lewin, the host, discusses the dire situation in some cases, where fish populations are overfished and other species and ecosystems are impacted. This calls for action to ensure the long-term health of the environment and the fishing industry. Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly explains that consumer demand can drive sustainability, as individuals can ask questions about the sustainability of seafood and express their preference for environmentally responsible sourcing. In fact, over 85% of the largest retailers and restaurant groups in the US have commitments to sourcing from environmentally responsible fisheries and aquaculture operations, showing that consumer demand can have a significant impact on industry practices. By caring about sustainability and asking for sustainable seafood options, individuals can contribute to the conservation of marine species and ecosystems.

According to the episode, social media has become a valuable tool for communicating information about sustainable seafood and engaging with interested individuals. In the past, organizations like the aquarium relied on traditional methods such as handing out paper pocket guides to educate the public about sustainable seafood. However, with the rise of social media, they now have a new and effective way to reach a larger audience.

Social media platforms provide a means for organizations like the aquarium to share information and updates about sustainable seafood practices. By utilizing platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, they can communicate directly with individuals who are interested in this information. This allows them to engage with their audience and provide ongoing updates and educational content.

One of the benefits of using social media is that it allows for continuous engagement with the audience. By posting content regularly, organizations can ensure that their message continues to show up in front of their followers. This increases the likelihood that individuals will continue to engage with the content and stay informed about sustainable seafood practices.

Additionally, social media provides an opportunity for organizations to address specific questions or concerns that individuals may have. By responding to comments and messages, they can provide personalized information and guidance. This can be particularly helpful for individuals who may have specific dietary restrictions or concerns about the environmental impact of certain seafood choices.

Furthermore, social media allows organizations to collaborate with other stakeholders and influencers in the sustainable seafood movement. Celebrity chefs and other influential figures can help amplify the message and reach an even wider audience. By partnering with these individuals, organizations can leverage their platforms and increase awareness about sustainable seafood practices.

Overall, social media has revolutionized the way organizations communicate about sustainable seafood. It provides a platform for ongoing engagement, personalized communication, and collaboration with other stakeholders. By utilizing social media effectively, organizations can reach a larger audience and promote the importance of responsible seafood sourcing to ensure the long-term health of our oceans and coastal environments.

In the episode, it is discussed that the market has the power to drive demand for sustainable seafood. This means that consumers, whether they are dining out or shopping for seafood, have the ability to make a difference by asking questions and showing that they care about sustainability. By inquiring about the sustainability of the seafood they are purchasing, consumers can influence the decisions of restaurateurs and retailers.

The podcast highlights that if enough people start asking these questions and expressing their concerns about sustainability, businesses will take notice. In fact, over 85% of the largest retailers and restaurant groups in the US have made commitments to sourcing from environmentally responsible fisheries and aquaculture operations. This demonstrates that consumer demand for sustainable seafood has already driven significant changes in the industry.

The importance of this market demand for sustainable seafood is emphasized throughout the episode. It is stated that without a persistent, loud public voice demanding sustainable and environmentally responsible seafood, the opportunity for improvement in the industry would be lost. Market pressure is crucial in driving these improvements and ensuring that seafood is sourced in a way that does not deplete fish populations, harm other species, or damage ecosystems and habitats.

The episode also mentions that the market demand for sustainable seafood has led to partnerships between the marine conservation community, businesses, and seafood industries in various countries. These partnerships aim to help seafood suppliers make improvements in their practices to meet the market demand for sustainability. Examples of such projects include working in Chile to improve farm salmon production and in Vietnam to improve tiger shrimp production.

Overall, the episode highlights the power of the market in driving demand for sustainable seafood. By expressing their concerns and making sustainable choices, consumers can contribute to a healthier environment and industry by ensuring the long-term sustainability of seafood resources.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1515_SeafoodWatch.mp3
Category:Seafood -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin tackles the challenge of communicating hope in the face of a changing climate. Despite the recent onslaught of natural disasters and extreme weather events, Lewin emphasizes the importance of maintaining hope and optimism for the future. He discusses the need for science and conservation communicators to convey messages of hope and explores how to convince people that there is hope in our climate future.

Tune in to learn more about the power of hope and how to speak up for the ocean.

Link mentioned in episode:
2) The Garbage Queen on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@thegarbagequeen
 
Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
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The episode emphasizes the crucial role of science communicators and conservation communicators in instilling hope and creating a better future for the planet. Andrew acknowledges the challenges and difficulties faced in the climate crisis, but emphasizes the importance of continuing to spread messages of hope and optimism. He highlights that hope can be found in various forms, such as in movies and through the concept of "ocean optimism." Andrew suggests that hope is the answer to addressing the climate crisis and emphasizes the need for effective communication of this hope. It is mentioned that articles and individuals like the "Garbage Queen" can play a significant role in moving things forward and solidifying a better future. Andrew firmly believes that with collective efforts and the involvement of people from all walks of life, a better future for the planet is possible. The episode encourages listeners to actively engage in conversations about climate hope and science communication, emphasizing the importance of sharing thoughts and ideas to foster positive change.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1514_ClimateHope.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In today's episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the devastating discovery of 100 dead river dolphins in the Brazilian Amazon River. Despite the pro-environment efforts of the current government, climate change continues to pose a threat to the region. The dolphins were found in Lake Tefe, where a significant population resides. The episode emphasizes the importance of monitoring other factors such as water quality to help increase the resiliency of the Amazon River ecosystem and the animals that use it.

Link to Article: https://www.cnn.com/2023/10/01/americas/amazon-river-dolphins-dead-temperatures-drought-intl-hnk/

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
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Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the devastating impact of climate change on ecosystems, specifically highlighting the deaths of a hundred river dolphins in the Amazon River. He emphasizes that climate change is causing significant changes and threats to these ecosystems, not only leading to the deaths of dolphins but also starting to affect humans. Andrew urges listeners to hold their government officials accountable, especially in places where they have the power to make a difference. The message is clear: climate change is here, and it is crucial to ensure the health and resilience of ecosystems by taking action and covering all bases.

Andrew uses the issue of plastic pollution, which is prevalent in every part of the ocean, rivers, and lakes, as an example of maintaining healthy water quality by preventing plastic from entering the ocean. The toxins from plastic pollution are impacting the health and resilience of animals such as dolphins, orcas, turtles, sharks, and various fish species. Andrew expresses concern about the long wait for a UN treaty to end plastic pollution, as the problem is urgent and requires immediate attention.

Andrew highlights the importance of regular water quality monitoring and maintaining ecosystem health in order to address the impacts of climate change and protect wildlife. He stress that when discussing climate change, it is necessary to consider the entire ecosystem as a whole. This includes holding individuals and organizations accountable for maintaining good water quality, as poor water quality exacerbates the negative effects of climate change. Andrew uses the examples of coral reefs and seagrass beds to illustrate this point.

Andrew also mentions the issue of inconsistent funding for water quality monitoring, which has led to gaps in data collection. This lack of consistent monitoring poses a challenge for maintaining ecosystem health, both on land and in water, especially in the face of climate change. He argues that if governments have a clear understanding of the state of rivers, lakes, oceans, and surrounding land, they can make better decisions and take more immediate action to protect vulnerable species such as river dolphins.

Additionally, Andrew highlights the increasing susceptibility of dolphins to droughts and higher temperatures. He emphasizes that maintaining water quality is crucial in order to mitigate the negative impacts of these climate-related factors on dolphin populations. Andrew acknowledges that droughts are inevitable and time-sensitive, making it even more important to prioritize water quality management and ecosystem health.

In conclusion, the episode emphasizes that regular water quality monitoring and maintaining ecosystem health are essential for addressing the impacts of climate change and protecting wildlife. Consistent monitoring allows for a better understanding of the state of ecosystems and enables governments to make informed decisions and take timely action. By prioritizing water quality management, we can mitigate the negative effects of climate change and protect vulnerable species from further harm.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1513_100RiverDolphinsDeadInAmazon.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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