How To Protect The Ocean

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S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the controversies surrounding COP28, and the climate change talks taking place in the United Arab Emirates. The UAE, known for its oil and gas production, has raised concerns as leaks suggest discussions on increasing fossil fuel production rather than reducing it. Andrew emphasizes the need for collective action and challenges the influence of the fossil fuel industry.

Tune in to stay informed on the latest news and controversies from COP28.

Links to articles:
1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p0gw5km0
2) https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/sultan-al-jaber-the-uae-oil-boss-steering-cop28/ar-AA1kANVx

In this episode, the host actively encourages listeners to engage with the podcast by providing feedback and sharing their passion. They provide two ways for listeners to reach out: sending emails through the website speakupforblue.com and leaving voice messages by clicking on the microphone icon on the website. This convenient and direct communication allows listeners to easily share their thoughts, opinions, and ideas with the host.

The host expresses a genuine interest in hearing from listeners and emphasizes the importance of their feedback. They specifically mention their desire to hear the passion in listeners' voices and encourage them to leave voice messages. This demonstrates the host's appreciation for the input and perspectives of their audience.

By actively encouraging feedback and engagement, the host aims to foster a community of involved and passionate listeners. They want to understand what listeners enjoy about the podcast, why they listen to it, and what they gain from it. This valuable feedback helps the host tailor future episodes and content to better meet the needs and interests of their audience.

Overall, the host's commitment to creating an interactive and listener-focused podcast is evident through their encouragement for listeners to send emails or leave voice messages. They value and appreciate the input of their audience, making the podcast responsive to feedback.

In this episode, the host highlights the importance of reducing fossil fuel dependence and promoting renewable energy. They mention Clean Energy Canada, a program in Canada that focuses on reducing the use of fossil fuel technologies and implementing alternative energy sources like heat pumps for residences instead of oil heating. The host also emphasizes the significance of sending skilled negotiators to international climate change meetings, such as COP28, to reach agreements that promote the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel production. This urgency to transition to renewable energy technologies is crucial in mitigating the impacts of climate change and protecting the planet.

The host also emphasizes the need to include oil and gas representatives in climate conversations for a smooth transition to a low-carbon economy. They explain that excluding these leaders from the talks may make them feel left out and excluded. The host argues that involving these representatives in the discussions is necessary for a successful transition to low-carbon energy processes. They mention that the president, Jabbar, supports this inclusion approach and wants oil and gas representatives to be part of COP28. Additionally, the host highlights that Jabbar, as the leader of COP28 and a chief executive in the oil industry, has been collaborating with oil and gas companies to reduce emissions. They mention that over 20 companies have committed to emission reductions at COP28, and a final deal on this commitment is expected to be announced at the conference. The host acknowledges that concerns may arise regarding potential conflicts of interest due to Jabbar's involvement in the oil and gas industry. However, they also recognize the significant role of money in these meetings and the potential for influential industry leaders to drive substantial outcomes.

Direct download: HTPTP_E1535_COP28IsItAJoke.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the Canadian government's ban on single-use plastics. He explains that the ban includes items such as straws, grocery bags, and takeout containers. However, he highlights a recent court ruling that may jeopardize the ban. The ruling states that these items should not be classified as toxic, potentially undermining the ban's effectiveness. Lewin delves into the importance of this classification and how it could impact the future of the plastic ban.

Tune in to learn more about the government's efforts to protect the ocean and how listeners can take action.

Link to article: https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/federal-court-quashes-cabinet-order-underlying-single-use-plastics-ban-1.6648375

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

In this episode, the discussion revolves around the harmful effects of plastic pollution on both the environment and human health. The host emphasizes the pervasive presence of plastic in our daily lives, including in our food, salt, and air. Of particular concern are microplastics, tiny particles of plastic that can be found in various types of food. The urgent need to halt the production and distribution of plastic is underscored as a crucial step in addressing this issue.

Plastic pollution is described as a universal problem that affects everyone, regardless of gender, race, culture, religion, or age. While the immediate effects may not be apparent, the long-term consequences can be detrimental to our well-being. The episode stresses the importance of taking action to combat plastic pollution and highlights Canada's efforts in implementing a ban on single-use plastic items such as straws, grocery bags, and takeout containers.

However, this ban in Canada faces potential challenges due to a recent court ruling that dismissed the classification of plastic as toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. This setback is seen as a significant obstacle in the fight against plastic pollution. The episode raises questions about how the government will respond to these challenges and emphasizes the ongoing need for collective efforts to address plastic pollution and safeguard both the environment and human health.

The episode also mentions that the Canadian government is aware of the plastic pollution crisis and is actively considering taking action. The host states that the government is carefully reviewing a federal court judgment and strongly considering an appeal. Additionally, they highlight the government's commitment to collaborating with provinces, territories, civil society, and industry to tackle plastic waste and pollution. The host emphasizes the urgency for the government to overcome the challenges posed by plastic pollution and take decisive action. It is evident that the Canadian government is cognizant of the issue and actively working towards finding solutions to address the plastic pollution crisis.

Oceana Canada is mentioned as an organization calling on industry leaders and governments across the country to join forces in ending plastic pollution at its source. The podcast transcript highlights Oceana Canada's plea for action and support from industry leaders and governments in their fight against plastic pollution. The host encourages listeners to visit Oceana Canada's page to learn more about their plastic campaign. Furthermore, the host expresses their intention to invite a representative from Oceana Canada to discuss the setback in detail on the podcast. The overall message conveyed is that Oceana Canada is actively engaged in efforts to end plastic pollution and seeks support from industry leaders and governments to achieve this crucial goal.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1534_CanadasSignleUsePlasticBanAtRisk.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Andrew interviews Bernie Geiss, Founder of Cove Contuinity Advisors Inc. and a representative from a B Corp business. They discuss the importance of the B Corp certification and how it impacts not only the environment but also local communities and employees. Bernie shares his company's focus on conserving relationships and the environment. 

Tune in to learn more about the B Corp program and the positive impact it has on protecting the planet and oceans.

Cove Website: www.coveadvisors.com
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/coveadvisors/

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Bernie Geiss had an unconventional educational journey. After dropping out of high school in grade 12, they embarked on a five-year travel adventure. During their travels, they had the opportunity to learn meditation from Buddhist teachers and renowned instructors in India. Upon returning to Canada, they sought a means to make a living and achieve self-sufficiency. Drawing from their background in studying philosophy, they found the topic of death to be comfortable and intriguing. This led them to view life insurance as a fascinating tool. One of the reasons they decided to pursue a career in life insurance was the fact that it did not require them to return to university or college. They also noted that professional designations in the life insurance industry were not offered through universities, which further motivated them to take shortcuts and attain these designations independently. Their goal was to build self-sufficiency for themselves and assist the individuals they worked with.

Bernie's exposure to meditation and their philosophical studies influenced their decision to enter the life insurance field. They perceived life insurance as an intriguing tool due to its connection to discussions about death, a topic they were comfortable with. Additionally, their strong desire for self-sufficiency and independence drove them to explore various career options. Ultimately, they chose life insurance as it provided an avenue for achieving self-sufficiency without the need for further formal education.

The speaker's pursuit of a career in life insurance was driven by their aspiration for self-sufficiency and the ability to align their work with their personal values and principles. They aimed to establish self-sufficiency for themselves and extend it to the individuals they served. Recognizing the value of life, disability, and critical illness insurance in times of crisis, such as the loss of a loved one or a disability, they believed these tools could provide crucial support. While the speaker acknowledged anecdotal stories of how insurance had positively impacted people's lives, the focus of the discussion was not on these stories. Instead, they emphasized how insurance allowed them to maintain their independence and avoid working for others. By becoming an independent broker, they were able to build their business based on their own philosophy and values, rather than conforming to someone else's. The speaker attributed their comfort with the concept of death to their background in studying philosophy, which further fueled their interest in life insurance. They chose this career path as they believed it offered a means to achieve self-sufficiency. Additionally, they expressed a desire to take shortcuts and avoid returning to university or college to obtain professional designations, as these were not available through universities anyway. In summary, the speaker's decision to pursue a career in life insurance was rooted in their pursuit of self-sufficiency and the opportunity to work in alignment with their own values and principles.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1533_BernieGeiss.mp3
Category:B Corp -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, host Andrew Luen explores the importance of science and conservation communication in changing behaviors to protect the ocean. He discusses the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday and the consumer frenzy of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, emphasizing the need to rethink our behavior and prioritize conservation.

Tune in to learn how we can speak up for the ocean and take action to create a better future for our planet.

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

Bernie's company is actively making a positive impact on the world through various environmental and local projects. The podcast transcript highlights how Bernie's team is involved in environmental initiatives and reconciliation projects with indigenous groups, demonstrating their commitment to improving the environment and making a difference in the community. Moreover, the podcast emphasizes that Bernie's team genuinely enjoys their work, indicating that the company's focus on these projects has fostered a positive culture within the team. Overall, Bernie's company is effectively leveraging their business to contribute to environmental and community initiatives, showcasing their dedication to creating a positive impact on the world.

In this episode of the podcast, the host explores the crucial role of science communicators in promoting alternatives to harmful consumerism. The host specifically emphasizes the negative consequences of materialistic behaviors, particularly during events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday. They shed light on how the commercial aspect of these events encourages people to purchase products that may harm the environment or exploit those involved in their production.

The host suggests that science communicators have a responsibility to encourage individuals to consider alternatives to material goods. Instead of simply discouraging the purchase of consumer products or gifts, they should promote experiences such as family trips or volunteering for charities. By focusing on these alternatives, science communicators can help shift the perspective from materialistic consumption to more sustainable and meaningful actions.

The host acknowledges the challenge science communicators face in addressing these issues without sounding negative. They emphasize the importance of presenting alternatives in a positive light, rather than solely discouraging certain behaviors. Instead of saying "don't buy this because it affects the environment," science communicators should focus on suggesting actions that benefit the environment, such as choosing eco-friendly products or engaging in activities that promote conservation.

Overall, this episode highlights the significant role of science communicators in promoting alternatives to harmful consumerism. By encouraging individuals to think beyond material goods and consider more sustainable actions, science communicators can help protect the environment and drive positive change.

In the episode, the speaker underscores the importance of considering the environmental impact of our purchases and only acquiring what is truly necessary. They draw attention to the consumerism associated with events like Black Friday and Cyber Monday, where people are enticed to buy discounted items without fully considering the environmental consequences. The speaker questions whether the convenience of acquiring more stuff, particularly from large online retailers like Amazon, outweighs the negative impacts on the environment and local communities.

They suggest that as science communicators, it is crucial to discuss alternatives to the materialistic mindset that often surrounds these shopping events. They advocate for a shift in behavior and mindset, encouraging individuals to reflect on their true needs and support small businesses that contribute to local economies. The speaker argues that instead of focusing on accumulating more possessions and wealth, individuals should prioritize making a positive impact on the world and their communities.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the need for individuals to be mindful consumers, considering the environmental consequences of their purchases and making choices that align with their values and the well-being of the planet.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1532_SciCommSpeakingThePublicsLanguage.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the often overlooked consequence of climate change: ocean acidification. He explains what ocean acidification is, its impact on the oceans, and explores potential solutions. This important issue is rarely discussed in the media, making it crucial for listeners to be informed and take action.

Link to article: https://greencoast.org/ocean-acidification-solutions/

Share your conservation journey on the podcast by booking here: https://calendly.com/sufb/sufb-interview
 
Fill out our listener survey: https://www.speakupforblue.com/survey
 
Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

In this episode, the host discusses the significance of utilizing alternative modes of transportation, such as walking, cycling, or public transport, to decrease carbon emissions from cars. The host emphasizes that these alternative transportation methods not only benefit the environment but also promote personal health.

While the host acknowledges that electric vehicles (EVs) are a viable option for transportation since they don't consume fossil fuels and therefore don't contribute to carbon emissions, they also encourage the use of walking, cycling, or public transport. These options are not only environmentally friendly but also promote physical activity and overall well-being.

Furthermore, the host highlights the concept of reducing food miles as a means to minimize transportation-related carbon emissions. They suggest consuming locally grown foods and eating locally, as most meals in the US travel over 1,500 miles to reach consumers. By purchasing and consuming local and seasonal food, individuals can reduce the energy and CO2 emissions associated with food transportation.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the importance of utilizing alternative modes of transportation, such as walking, cycling, or public transport, to reduce carbon emissions from cars. It also promotes the idea of eating locally and consuming locally grown foods to minimize transportation-related carbon emissions.

In this episode, the host emphasizes the significance of eating locally grown foods as a way to reduce the transportation of food and the associated carbon emissions. The host explains that most meals in the US travel over 1,500 miles to reach our plates, and this transportation by road, rail, or air consumes energy and releases CO2, with air freight being the most polluting. By choosing to eat locally, such as shopping at farmer's markets or local groceries, individuals can significantly reduce the distance that food needs to travel.

The host emphasizes the benefits of consuming seasonal food that is available in and around our area. By doing so, we can switch to foods that are readily available and do not require long-distance transportation. This not only reduces carbon emissions but also allows individuals to connect with the food in their local communities.

Additionally, the host mentions the concept of "food miles," which refers to the distance that food travels from the farm to the consumer. By reducing food miles through the consumption of locally grown foods, individuals can contribute to reducing the carbon footprint associated with food transportation.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the importance of eating locally grown foods as a way to reduce the transportation of food and the associated carbon emissions. By making conscious choices and opting for seasonal and locally sourced food, individuals can play a significant role in mitigating the environmental impact of the food industry.

In this episode, the host discusses the importance of repair, reuse, and recycling to decrease carbon emissions from manufacturing new products. The host points out that often, items are discarded instead of being repaired due to the high cost of fixing them or the convenience of buying new ones. However, the host emphasizes the need to shift this mindset and prioritize repairing more things, such as iPhones or mobile phones, instead of immediately disposing of them.

By repairing and reusing items, the host explains that we can significantly reduce the amount of CO2 emitted during the manufacturing process of new products. This is because manufacturing new products requires energy and resources, which contribute to carbon emissions. By extending the lifespan of products through repair and reuse, we can minimize the need for new production and therefore reduce the associated CO2 emissions.

Additionally, the host acknowledges the importance of recycling certain items. While recycling is often seen as a solution to reducing waste and carbon emissions, the host acknowledges that it can sometimes be misleading, as not all items are equally recyclable. However, the host encourages listeners to prioritize refusing single-use plastics and other non-recyclable items whenever possible. By refusing and reusing items that are difficult to dispose of, we can further contribute to reducing carbon emissions and protecting natural environments.

Overall, the episode emphasizes the importance of repair, reuse, and recycling as strategies to decrease carbon emissions from manufacturing new products. By adopting these practices, we can extend the lifespan of items, minimize waste, and decrease the energy and resources required for new production, ultimately leading to a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly approach.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1531_OceanAcidification.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, we have exciting news from Papua New Guinea. They have established two new marine protected areas spanning 16,000 square kilometers, making it one of the largest community-led efforts of its kind. The process took seven years and involved over 9,000 people from 100 indigenous communities. These protected areas are a significant victory for Papua New Guinea, indigenous peoples, and endangered marine species like sharks, rays, and turtles. This achievement sets an example of successful community and government partnership on the path to achieving the global 30 by 30 target.

Tune in to learn more about this remarkable conservation effort.

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In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, the host discusses the importance of ratings and reviews in helping new listeners decide whether to tune in. Listeners are encouraged to leave ratings and reviews on platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and other favorite podcast apps. The host specifically asks for feedback on why listeners enjoy the podcast and their overall experience. By sharing their thoughts, listeners can help others understand what to expect and potentially have the same positive experience.

To further engage with the audience, the host suggests reaching out on Instagram and sharing a screenshot of their rating and review. It is emphasized that the host does not take offense if listeners don't love the podcast, but they want to provide transparency and help potential listeners make informed decisions.

Moving on, the episode delves into the concept of contributing to ocean conservation commitments (OCCs) as a way for individuals to directly support marine protected areas (MPAs) and initiatives. OCCs are highlighted as a new funding model that has revolutionized conservation efforts. By financially supporting a specific square kilometer of an MPA for 20 years or more, individuals can have a direct impact on its management and success.

The host draws a parallel to platforms like Patreon, where creators update their supporters on project progress. Similarly, supporters of OCCs would want to stay informed about the management of the MPAs they are supporting. The host acknowledges that OCCs provide an opportunity for individuals who may feel frustrated or unable to support larger initiatives to contribute to ocean conservation.

However, the host also emphasizes the need for trust, fail-safes, and reporting mechanisms to ensure the effectiveness and transparency of the OCC model. The example of the island of Nui is mentioned as a case study to understand how the OCC model works and how people respond to supporting such initiatives.

Listeners are invited to share their thoughts on the OCC business model and encouraged to listen to the episode for more information. Contact information is provided for leaving comments, ratings, and reviews, which can help others understand the value of the podcast and why they should give it a listen.

Lastly, the episode celebrates the establishment of two new marine protected areas in Papua New Guinea. These MPAs cover an impressive 16,000 square kilometers, equivalent to 1.5 million hectares. Not only is this one of the largest MPAs in terms of size, but it is also significant because it was established through a community-led process.

The process of establishing these MPAs spanned seven years and involved the participation of over 9,000 people from more than 100 indigenous communities. This community-led approach ensures that local communities have rights and a say over their lands and seas. The establishment of these MPAs is a remarkable achievement and a testament to the efforts of everyone involved.

Furthermore, the creation of these MPAs in Papua New Guinea contributes to the global goal of protecting and conserving at least 30% of the Earth's land and seas by 2030, known as "30 by 30." While there is still progress to be made to reach this target, the establishment of these MPAs in Papua New Guinea is a step in the right direction.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of marine protected areas and their positive impact on biodiversity and conservation efforts. It also highlights the significance of community involvement and the crucial role that indigenous peoples play in managing and safeguarding their lands and seas.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1530_TwoMPAsEstablishedInPapuaNewGuinea.mp3
Category:Marine Protected Areas -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of science communication in academia. He highlights the changing landscape of communication, including the rise of social media and digital channels. Lewin emphasizes the value of having good communication skills and investing time in science communication. He recalls how research used to receive coverage on traditional media platforms, such as TV shows and newspapers, and the impact it had on people's interest.

Tune in to learn more about how researchers can effectively share their work on university channels and advocate for a better ocean.

Link to article: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0290504#sec001

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The host of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast encourages listeners to engage with the show in various ways. He appreciates those who listen to every episode and invites them to provide comments and feedback on the podcast's content and performance. Additionally, he encourages listeners to connect with him on Instagram at How to Protect the Ocean. The host also requests that listeners leave a rating and review on popular podcast platforms like Apple Podcasts or Spotify. By actively participating in the podcast community through comments, feedback, and social media interaction, listeners can contribute to the growth of the show.

In one episode, the host emphasizes the significance of science communication within universities and urges researchers to dedicate more time to sharing their research. The host acknowledges the evolving landscape of science communication at universities and stresses the importance of researchers understanding its relevance. They highlight the need for researchers to possess strong communication skills and be willing to invest additional time in science communication. The host suggests that researchers can increase the visibility of their research by collaborating with their university's central communications office. They advise researchers not to wait for the university to promote their work, but rather to proactively develop a science communication strategy to publish their research through the university. The host also mentions that science communication can be a valuable learning experience for PhD, postdoc, and master's students, as it allows them to collaborate with the university's central communications office. Overall, the episode emphasizes the value of science communication for researchers within universities and encourages active engagement in sharing their research.

The host of the podcast emphasizes the importance of listeners leaving ratings and reviews on their preferred podcast platforms. They highlight how these ratings and reviews contribute to the organic growth of the podcast. By leaving positive ratings and reviews, listeners can help attract new audience members who are interested in similar topics, such as the ocean. The host also expresses appreciation for listener feedback and engagement, as it helps improve the podcast and provide valuable information. Alongside leaving ratings and reviews, listeners are encouraged to engage with the host on social media, particularly on Instagram at "How to Protect the Ocean." This demonstrates the host's value for interaction and communication with their audience.


In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the recent victory in the Hawaii Supreme Court, where they rejected Big Oil's appeal to avoid going to trial. This decision is significant as it allows the court to hold oil and gas companies accountable for their role in climate change. Andrew highlights the devastating consequences of climate change in Hawaii, particularly the wildfires that caused loss of life and property. This episode emphasizes the importance of taking action to protect the ocean and combat climate change.

Link to article:
https://www.commondreams.org/news/honolulu-climate-case

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In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, the host discusses a significant development in the legal battle between oil and gas companies and their connection to climate change. The Hawaii Supreme Court has rejected the appeal from Big Oil companies to avoid going to trial. This decision is seen as a win for those advocating for action on climate change and holding fossil fuel companies accountable for their role in contributing to global warming.

The lawsuit, filed in 2020, accuses major oil and gas companies such as ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, and Sunoco of knowingly promoting fossil fuel products that pose a threat to the world's climate. The plaintiffs argue that these companies engaged in deceptive campaigns to downplay the link between their products and global warming, as well as the resulting environmental, social, and economic consequences.

Chief Justice Mark Rectilwad, in his majority opinion, stated that the oil companies' attempt to dismiss the lawsuit on the basis of regulating emissions fell short. He emphasized that the lawsuit does not seek to regulate emissions or seek damages for interstate emissions. Instead, the plaintiffs' complaint aims to challenge the promotion and sale of fossil fuel products without proper warnings, aided by a sophisticated disinformation campaign.

The court's decision means that the case will proceed to trial, allowing for further examination of the allegations and the gathering of evidence through the discovery process. Matthew Gonser, the executive director of Honolulu's Office of Climate Change, Sustainability, and Resiliency, expressed support for the court's decision and pledged to continue pursuing the case in a trial court where it was initially filed three and a half years ago.

This development in Hawaii highlights the growing efforts to hold oil and gas companies accountable for their role in climate change. It sets a precedent for similar lawsuits and legal actions in other regions where communities have been impacted by the consequences of global warming. The outcome of this trial will be closely watched as it may have implications for future litigation against fossil fuel companies and their responsibility for addressing climate change.

In addition to discussing the legal battle, the episode also addresses the importance of reviews for the How to Protect the Ocean podcast. Host Andrew Lewin encourages listeners to leave ratings and reviews on platforms like Apple Podcasts or Spotify. These reviews not only provide valuable feedback but also help others discover the podcast. Lewin explains that when people are looking for an ocean or conservation podcast to listen to, they often rely on recommendations and ratings. By leaving a review, listeners can contribute to the podcast's visibility and help it reach a wider audience. The host even invites listeners to share a screenshot of their review with him, expressing his excitement to hear their feedback.

Overall, this episode emphasizes the significance of the court's decision in holding oil and gas companies accountable for their actions related to climate change. It also highlights the importance of reviews in providing feedback and helping others discover and enjoy the How to Protect the Ocean podcast.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1528_OilCompaniesLoseAppealOnTrailInHawaii.mp3
Category:Climate Justice -- posted at: 12:02am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Andrew discusses the myths and misconceptions surrounding clean energy in Canada. Joined by Jana Elbrecht, a policy advisor with Clean Energy Canada, they aim to debunk these narratives and shed light on the benefits of renewable energy. They explore topics such as the cost-effectiveness of transitioning to clean energy and the impact of carbon taxing.

Tune in to learn more about the importance of clean energy and why it deserves recognition in Canada.

Links mentioned in the episode:
1) https://www.cer-rec.gc.ca/en/data-analysis/energy-markets/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles/provincial-territorial-energy-profiles-canada.html
2) https://cleanenergycanada.org/media-brief-addressing-common-myths-around-renewable-power/
3) https://cleanenergycanada.org/report/a-clean-bill/
4) https://cleanenergycanada.org/households-in-nova-scotia-can-save-up-to-11000-a-year-by-choosing-clean-energy/

In this episode, the guest explores the concept that failing to reach certain targets can actually be seen as an opportunity for growth and acceleration of plans. This perspective is crucial as it promotes a positive mindset and a willingness to learn from setbacks.

The guest emphasizes the importance of not perceiving failure as an ultimate defeat, but rather as a chance to reassess and adjust strategies. They suggest that when targets are not met, it provides an opportunity to reflect on what went wrong and identify areas for improvement.

By reframing failure as an opportunity, both organizations and individuals can approach setbacks with a growth mindset. Instead of becoming discouraged or giving up, they can utilize the experience to learn, adapt, and develop new strategies to achieve their goals.

The guest also highlights the significance of accelerating plans when faced with failure to meet targets. This involves taking decisive action to address the gaps and shortcomings that led to the failure. It may entail implementing new technologies, adopting innovative approaches, or seeking partnerships and collaborations to expedite progress.

Overall, this episode underscores the importance of viewing failure as an opportunity for growth and the acceleration of plans. By embracing this mindset, individuals and organizations can overcome setbacks and continue working towards their goals with renewed determination and resilience.

Furthermore, the episode emphasizes the need for more widespread and informative discussions surrounding climate change and clean energy. Both the host and guest express their appreciation for having the opportunity to discuss these topics on the podcast, as they believe that this type of information is not often discussed on a level that reaches a wide audience. They express a desire to have more conversations like this to help people understand the progress being made toward clean energy and addressing climate change.

The guest, Jana Alberts, mentions that there is a faction in Canada (and likely elsewhere in the world) that opposes taking action on climate change. However, she believes that this opposition stems from a lack of understanding and awareness of the opportunities that clean energy presents. She emphasizes that transitioning to clean energy could be a great opportunity for Canada, especially considering the country's already high percentage of clean electricity compared to other countries like Germany.

The host also expresses frustration with a narrative that undermines the positive aspects of clean energy. They aim to use the podcast as a platform to dispel myths and narratives that may undermine the benefits of clean energy. They firmly believe that clean energy is a viable solution and want to provide informative discussions to counteract any misinformation or doubts surrounding it.

During the episode, the host addresses the existence of myths and narratives that manipulate people into thinking that clean energy is ineffective, which they find frustrating. They wanted to dedicate this episode to debunking these misconceptions and providing accurate information about clean energy. They express frustration with the narrative that pushes against the positive aspects of clean energy.

One of the myths discussed in the episode is the belief that clean energy is expensive. The host asks the guest, Jana Alberts, about the cost of transitioning to clean energy, specifically in terms of purchasing solar panels for roofs or electric vehicles (EVs). Jana explains that the opposite is true and that clean energy is actually becoming more affordable. She points out that this is a common myth they often encounter.

Another myth mentioned is the concern about the intermittency of renewable energy sources like wind and solar. The host asks Jana about the common worry of what happens if the wind doesn't blow or the sun doesn't shine. Jana addresses this by highlighting countries like Denmark, which have a high share of renewable energy in their electricity generation without experiencing blackouts or major issues. This example challenges the myth that renewable energy is unreliable.

Overall, the episode aims to debunk these myths and provide accurate information about the effectiveness and affordability of clean energy.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1527_CleanEnergyCanadaJanaElbrecht.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:22pm EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of influencers and celebrities speaking up for the ocean and climate change. He starts off by highlighting Kim Kardashian's new product, a bra where part of the proceeds go to 1% for the planet. Andrew emphasizes that the involvement of celebrities in climate change discussions is significant and explores why it matters. He reflects on a time when climate change wasn't a widely discussed topic and emphasizes the role of social media in raising awareness.

Tune in to learn more about the power of celebrity influence and how we can all contribute to protecting the ocean.

Link to whitepaper: https://www.climatecommunications.earth/whitepaper-articles/influencing-the-influencers

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According to the podcast episode, social media algorithms have a bias towards short-form and entertaining content, which limits the visibility of real-world examples and work on campaigns for social and environmental justice. The transcript highlights that social media platforms often prioritize content that is more about screen time and entertainment value, while limiting the visibility of stories and solutions related to injustices. As a result, important information and projects related to social and environmental justice may not be widely promoted or shared on these platforms.

The episode emphasizes the need to elevate those who engage in local grassroots activism and share real-world examples and work. It suggests that algorithms do not prioritize the sharing of information on specific projects and injustices, potentially hindering the dissemination of important information. This limitation is seen as problematic because some of these stories and projects may be difficult to digest but need to be addressed and changed.

The transcript also highlights the imbalance in how online activism is valued higher than offline activism. Grassroots organizers and organizations have relevant data and case studies showcasing how injustices were fought and what was demanded, but social media platforms may limit the visibility of these stories and solutions. This suggests that the algorithms used by social media platforms may not effectively promote or prioritize content related to social and environmental justice, potentially hindering the impact of grassroots activism and the dissemination of important information.

Many climate influencers rely on advertising and promotional agreements to fund their work and support their teams and families. The podcast transcript mentions that these influencers, including the host himself, share and promote product ads to secure funding models that sustain their work. Advertising or promotional agreements provide financial support for their efforts, allowing them to fund their teams and even support their families. This suggests that the role of an eco-influencer has evolved beyond simply informing people about sustainable products. It now includes elements of entrepreneurship, storytelling, and thought leadership. However, finding businesses or companies willing to fund climate-related messages can be challenging, as it is not always seen as a profitable endeavor. This difficulty in securing funding is similar to the host's experience in podcasting, where finding a business model that works and obtaining sponsorships from sustainable companies is a constant struggle. Nonetheless, advertising and promotional agreements remain crucial for many climate influencers to continue their important work in raising awareness and advocating for action on climate change.

According to the episode, the role of an eco-influencer has evolved beyond simply promoting sustainable products. In addition to advocating for more sustainable choices, eco-influencers now engage in entrepreneurship, storytelling, and thought leadership. This means that they not only promote sustainable products but also collaborate with academic institutions to communicate climate science and work with organizations to drive their message. They utilize various forms of media, such as videos, photos, and illustrations, to effectively communicate their message and engage their audience. This evolution in the role of eco-influencers highlights the importance of raising awareness about climate change and inspiring action, rather than solely focusing on product promotion.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1526_TheRoleOfClimateInfluencers.mp3
Category:SciComm -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the controversial topic of the pilot whale and white-sided dolphin hunts in the Faroe Islands. He highlights a recent report by marine conservation organizations that questions the claims of these hunts being humane, sustainable, and integral to the local culture. Join Andrew as he delves into the debate surrounding these hunts and explores the implications for ocean conservation.

Links to articles:
1) https://www.awionline.org/sites/default/files/uploads/documents/Unravelling-the-Truth-Whale-Killing-in-the-Faroe-Islands.pdf

2) https://www.ktoo.org/2023/07/14/78-pilot-whales-were-slaughtered-near-a-cruise-ship-carrying-marine-conservationists-in-europe/

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The host of the show repeatedly encourages listeners to leave a message and a review, emphasizing the importance of sharing their thoughts on the episode. He expresses a genuine desire to hear from the audience, as well as highlighting the value of their feedback for potential new listeners. The host provides various avenues for listeners to get in touch, including Instagram, the podcast's website, and even voicemail. Additionally, he reminds listeners to follow or subscribe to the podcast for regular updates on new episodes. Overall, the host actively values and encourages listener engagement and feedback.

The episode delves into the controversial topic of the Faroe Islands' drive hunts for pilot whales and Atlantic white-sided dolphins. It raises thought-provoking questions about the claims of these hunts being humane, sustainable, and integral to the local culture. The episode references a report titled "Unraveling the Truth, Whale Killing in the Faroe Islands" by a coalition of marine conservation organizations, which challenges these claims.

Throughout the episode, the controversy surrounding the Faroese drive hunts and the opposition they face is highlighted. Criticism or attempts to cancel the hunts often result in backlash from those who participate in and profit from them. Defenders argue that the hunts are deeply rooted in their culture and have been practiced for centuries. They also claim that the hunts are carried out as humanely as possible and that the populations of the hunted animals are sustainable.

However, the episode presents counterarguments to these claims. It suggests that while modern hunting techniques have made the hunts more efficient, they may not necessarily be humane. The methods used to chase, secure, and kill the whales and dolphins would not be permitted in the killing of livestock or other animals in most countries. A review of these techniques concludes that they are ethically and morally unacceptable, considering the sentient nature of these animals.

Furthermore, the episode questions the sustainability of the hunts. It highlights that the technology used allows for the capture of larger numbers of whales and dolphins, potentially harming their populations. Concerns are also raised about the consumption of the hunted animals, particularly regarding high mercury levels in their meat. The episode suggests that consuming whale meat may not be advisable due to these health risks.

Overall, the episode critically examines the Faroese drive hunts for pilot whales and Atlantic white-sided dolphins. It challenges the claims of cultural significance, sustainability, and humane practices, presenting arguments and evidence that question the validity of these claims.

In addition, the host invites listeners to share their thoughts on the Faroese drive hunt and encourages them to reach out through Instagram or the podcast's website. He expresses a genuine interest in hearing what listeners think about the hunt and whether they believe it should continue or be stopped. The host acknowledges the challenges of having a dialogue with hunters and locals as outsiders, but suggests finding ways to engage in conversation and understand their perspectives. He also asks for suggestions on how to initiate a dialogue and learn why the hunters continue to hunt, as well as what can be done to stop the hunt. The host welcomes different viewpoints and encourages listeners to participate in online petitions and support organizations working towards ending the Faroese hunt.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1525_FaroeIslandsWhaleHuntUpdate.mp3
Category:The Faroe Islands -- posted at: 11:00pm EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the progress and next steps for the High Seas Treaty. He highlights the significance of the treaty being signed by over 80 countries and emphasizes the need for more countries to join. The episode explores what comes next in the process of getting the high seas protected and emphasizes the importance of collective action for a better ocean.

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In this episode, the host encourages listeners to actively participate by leaving a voice message and sharing the episode to raise awareness and foster optimism for the ocean. The host expresses a genuine desire to hear the voices of the listeners and urges them to spread the episode among their colleagues, family, and friends. Emphasizing the importance of optimism and hope for the ocean, the host highlights the significance of spreading awareness as a means to inspire others and contribute to the protection of the high seas.

The episode underscores the crucial role of understanding the genetics of the ocean, species, habitats, and ecosystems in effectively safeguarding them. The host emphasizes the indispensability of genetic resources and the need to gather information about the genetics of the ocean. This information is vital for conducting impact assessments and monitoring the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). The host stresses the importance of identifying what requires protection and the continuous monitoring necessary to assess the efficacy of MPAs and impact assessments. Additionally, the episode underscores the significance of genetic biodiversity and genetic materials in preserving overall biodiversity and the planet. The host highlights the necessity of a fit-for-purpose ocean observing system to support the Biodiversity Beyond National Jurisdiction (BBNJ) agreement, which aims to protect biodiversity beyond countries' exclusive economic zones. The host expresses optimism and hope that by safeguarding the ocean and its genetic resources, a positive impact can be made, ensuring the sustainability of marine ecosystems.

Furthermore, the host discusses the signing of the high seas treaty, a significant achievement in early 2023. While over 80 countries have signed the treaty, the host emphasizes the need for more countries to join. The treaty's purpose is to protect the high seas, referring to the ocean beyond each country's exclusive economic zone (EEZ). The host underscores the importance of safeguarding the high seas due to the current lack of sufficient management, oversight, and enforcement in this area.

A key component of the high seas treaty is the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). These designated boundaries within the ocean aim to prevent extractive activities such as oil and gas extraction, deep-sea mining, and fishing, providing protection to marine ecosystems and biodiversity. The host emphasizes the necessity of increasing the number of MPAs in the high seas to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of marine resources.

The episode also highlights the need for environmental impact assessments (EIAs) in the high seas. EIAs are conducted to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of proposed projects or activities. The host points out the lack of impact assessments on larger projects in the high seas, which have been carried out without proper barriers or management. The high seas treaty seeks to address this issue by promoting the implementation of impact assessments to ensure the sustainable development of the high seas.

Additionally, the host underscores the importance of genetic resources in the high seas. Genetic resources refer to the genetic material of marine organisms that can be utilized for scientific research and the development of new drugs. The host emphasizes the need for more genetic resources in the high seas and suggests that the high seas treaty can facilitate access to and sharing of these resources for the advancement of science and conservation efforts.

Overall, the episode highlights the signing of the high seas treaty as a significant step towards protecting the high seas. However, the host emphasizes the need for further action in terms of establishing more protected areas, conducting impact assessments, enforcing regulations, and accessing genetic resources. These actions are crucial for ensuring the long-term sustainability and conservation of the high seas.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1524_HighSeasTreatyWhatsNext.mp3
Category:High Seas -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of spreading awareness about ocean conservation and protection. He highlights the negative connotation surrounding these efforts and emphasizes the need to bring hope and optimism back into the conversation. Andrew discusses the role of communication in spreading awareness and instilling belief in the possibility of protecting the ocean. He concludes by exploring how to foster hope and optimism in our efforts to protect the ocean.

Tune in to learn more about the vital role of communication in ocean conservation.

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In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, the host emphasizes the importance of effectively communicating the need to protect the ocean in order to inspire hope and belief in the possibility of positive change. The host acknowledges the negative connotation surrounding ocean protection and conservation, and the lack of awareness about what needs to be done. Therefore, spreading awareness and increasing optimism is crucial.

The host draws a parallel between movies, particularly in sci-fi genres, where hope is a major theme. Characters rely on hope to overcome challenges, even in the face of the end of the world. Similarly, protecting the ocean requires optimism and hope. By effectively communicating the importance of ocean protection, individuals can regain their hope and believe that positive change is possible.

Science communication is highlighted as a key tool in spreading awareness about ocean protection. The host acknowledges that while talking about science communication is easy, implementing effective strategies can be challenging. However, it is emphasized that it starts with each individual. By taking action and actively engaging in science communication, individuals can contribute to spreading awareness and inspiring hope in others.

The episode concludes with a call to action, urging listeners to start their science communication journey right away. The host encourages individuals to seek help if needed and emphasizes the importance of taking action now. By starting the conversation and actively participating in science communication, individuals can play a role in protecting the ocean and promoting a more optimistic and hopeful outlook for the future.

The episode discusses the challenges of implementing effective science communication. The host acknowledges that while it is easy to talk about the importance of science communication and what needs to be done, actually implementing these strategies can be difficult. The host mentions that it is not easy to do and that it can be a struggle for many people.

One challenge mentioned is finding the right platform for science communication. The host suggests picking a digital platform, such as social media, videos, or podcasts, but acknowledges that it doesn't need to be perfect or great. The important thing is to start and be consistent, as improvement will come over time.

Another challenge mentioned is the fear or discomfort that some individuals may have when it comes to science communication. The host shares experiences of working with clients who initially struggled with podcasting but eventually became more comfortable with it. This highlights the need for individuals to overcome their fears and step out of their comfort zones in order to effectively communicate science.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that implementing effective science communication can be challenging, but it is important to start and take action. It encourages individuals to spread awareness, connect with their audience, and provide hope and optimism through their communication efforts.

In the episode, the host emphasizes the importance of having a drive to continuously improve and pivot in order to be more effective in ocean conservation efforts. The host acknowledges that implementing ocean conservation measures can be difficult and challenging. It requires time, effort, and a level of dedication that may not always be incentivized in our jobs or lives. However, the host emphasizes that this drive to protect the ocean is what fuels their passion and mission.

The host shares that they started the podcast because they wanted to stay connected and up-to-date with the latest news, projects, and people in the ocean conservation field. They recognized that finding a full-time job in ocean conservation was challenging, so they took it upon themselves to create a platform where they could continue to be involved and make a difference. This drive to stay engaged and informed demonstrates the host's commitment to continuously improving their understanding and impact in ocean conservation.

The host also highlights the need to be open to pivoting and adapting in order to be more effective in ocean conservation efforts. They mention the importance of shifting strategies when needed and being willing to embrace change. This flexibility and willingness to adapt is crucial in a field that is constantly evolving and facing new challenges.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that having a drive to continuously improve and pivot is essential in making a meaningful impact in ocean conservation. It requires dedication, perseverance, and a commitment to staying informed and adaptable. By continuously striving to be better and more effective, individuals can contribute to the protection and conservation of the ocean.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1523_HowToGetBetterAtScienceCommunication.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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