How To Protect The Ocean (Sharks)

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On this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Dr. David Ebert discusses the importance of his book, "The Field Guide to Sharks, Rays, and Chimeras of the East Coast of North America," which describes over 1,200 species. He has authored over 30 books on marine life and is joined by shark illustrator Mark Dando. Listeners will learn about the growth in knowledge of shark species and the significance of field guides for shark conservationists and enthusiasts.

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Dr. David Ebert is a renowned expert in the field of elasmobranchs, having described 50 shark species and authored an impressive 36 books on sharks, rays, and chimeras. His extensive knowledge and dedication to studying these marine creatures have significantly contributed to our understanding of their diversity and biology. Through his research and publications, Dr. Ebert has expanded the scientific community's knowledge and provided valuable resources for shark enthusiasts, conservationists, and researchers.

Beyond identifying and describing new species, Dr. Ebert has delved into various aspects of shark biology, including trophic ecology, diet studies, reproduction, and distribution. His expertise in these areas has allowed for a comprehensive understanding of the ecological roles and conservation needs of different shark species. Additionally, his focus on lesser-known species, such as skates and ghost sharks, highlights the importance of studying and conserving these often-overlooked elasmobranchs.

Dr. Ebert's impact extends beyond the scientific community. His field guides and books serve as valuable resources for fishermen, beachgoers, and conservation organizations, enabling them to identify and learn more about the sharks, rays, and chimeras found in the East Coast of North America and beyond. By inspiring others to explore and study these fascinating marine creatures, Dr. Ebert's work continues to shape the future of shark research and conservation efforts.

The Field Guide to Sharks, Rays, and Chimeras of the East Coast of North America, authored by Dr. David Ebert, is a crucial resource for identifying and understanding the diverse species of elasmobranchs found along the East Coast. This comprehensive guide, featuring detailed illustrations by Mark Dando, provides valuable information on 173 species, including 92 sharks, 72 rays and skates, and nine chimeras. The book aims to assist scientists, conservationists, and the general public in recognizing and appreciating the marine life in this region.

Dr. Ebert's extensive experience in describing and studying sharks has led to the creation of this field guide, essential for promoting conservation efforts. By accurately identifying species and understanding their distributions, researchers, government agencies, and NGOs can develop effective conservation and management strategies. The book not only highlights common species but also sheds light on lesser-known and endangered species, such as sawfish and ghost sharks, emphasizing the importance of protecting these vulnerable populations.

Moreover, the field guide serves as a tool for inspiring future research and conservation initiatives. Dr. Ebert's work has motivated students and enthusiasts to delve deeper into the world of elasmobranchs, leading to potential graduate studies and conservation projects. By providing accessible and informative content, the book encourages individuals to explore and appreciate the diversity of sharks, rays, and chimeras along the East Coast.

Overall, The Field Guide to Sharks, Rays, and Chimeras of the East Coast of North America plays a vital role in species identification, conservation awareness, and scientific exploration. It serves as a valuable resource for anyone interested in marine biodiversity and underscores the importance of protecting these fascinating creatures for future generations.

Dr. David Ebert's extensive collection of books, particularly his field guides on sharks, rays, and chimeras, have not only served as valuable resources for the scientific community but have also inspired young scientists to delve into the world of lesser-known species. Through his books, Dr. Ebert has highlighted the importance of studying and understanding species like rays and ghost sharks, which are often overlooked in favor of more charismatic species like white sharks.

His dedication to documenting and describing these lesser-known species has sparked curiosity and interest among aspiring scientists. By providing detailed information and illustrations in his books, Dr. Ebert has made these enigmatic creatures more accessible and intriguing to a wider audience. This accessibility has encouraged young researchers to explore these lesser-known species further, leading to potential research opportunities and discoveries in the field of elasmobranch biology.

Dr. Ebert's work not only serves as a guide for identification and conservation but also as a catalyst for future research and exploration. His passion for uncovering the mysteries of the ocean and shedding light on lost sharks has inspired a new generation of scientists to pursue studies on these often neglected species, ultimately contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of marine ecosystems.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1605_DaveEbertSharkRaysChimerasOfNA1.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin delves into the controversial topic of shark nets in Australia. While these nets are intended to protect beachgoers from certain shark species, they also harm non-targeted marine animals like sea turtles and dolphins. The discussion revolves around the effectiveness of shark nets in ensuring beach safety and the impact on ocean species.

Join the conversation to learn more about the balance between human safety and marine conservation efforts.

Link to article: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/30/more-than-90-of-marine-animals-caught-in-nsw-shark-nets-over-summer-were-non-target-species

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One of the key issues discussed in the podcast episode is the high rate of non-target species caught by shark nets in Australia. These nets, designed to prevent shark attacks on beachgoers, have caused significant harm to marine animals, including sea turtles, dolphins, and smaller sharks. The transcript reveals that more than half of the non-target species caught in the nets over the past eight months were killed, with 134 dead animals recorded. Among the casualties were critically endangered gray nurse sharks, endangered leatherback sea turtles, and loggerhead turtles.

Data from the Humane Society International showed that out of all non-target animals caught, only 36% were released alive. Releasing non-target species from the nets is challenging, as animals like sea turtles and dolphins require air to breathe and may drown if not promptly freed. The issue of bycatch is worsened by the fact that the shark nets have a 12 to 1 ratio of non-target to target species caught, indicating a disproportionate impact on non-target marine animals.

The harm inflicted on these non-target species by shark nets raises concerns about the effectiveness and ethical implications of using such methods for shark control. The podcast episode stresses the need to reassess shark net programs in Australia and explore alternative technologies to mitigate negative impacts on marine biodiversity. The discussion underscores the importance of considering the broader ecological consequences of shark netting practices and the urgency of finding more sustainable and species-specific solutions to protect both beachgoers and marine wildlife.

A key point highlighted in the podcast episode is the lack of scientific evidence supporting the effectiveness of shark nets in reducing the risk of shark bites. Despite the installation of shark nets in Australia to prevent certain shark species from entering popular beaches, there is controversy surrounding their actual efficacy.

The host mentions that shark scientists, based on their research and discussions within the shark science community, have not come across any scientific studies that definitively prove the effectiveness of shark nets in reducing the risk of shark bites. This lack of concrete evidence raises questions about the justification for using shark nets as a method of protecting beachgoers.

Furthermore, a recent study mentioned in the episode revealed concerning statistics regarding the impact of shark nets on marine animals. More than 90% of the marine animals caught in shark nets off New South Wales beaches were non-target species, including sea turtles, dolphins, and smaller sharks. The data showed that a significant number of these non-target animals were killed as a result of being caught in the nets.

The high percentage of non-target species caught and killed in shark nets raises ethical and conservation concerns. The bycatch of endangered species such as gray nurse sharks, leatherback sea turtles, and loggerhead turtles underscores the detrimental effects of shark nets on marine biodiversity.

The episode also discusses the internal division within the Australian government regarding the shark net program. While some departments acknowledge the unavoidable nature of bycatch in shark nets, others, including the Environment Minister, have privately expressed support for ending the use of shark nets. This internal debate reflects the growing recognition of the negative consequences associated with shark nets.

In conclusion, the lack of scientific evidence supporting the effectiveness of shark nets, coupled with the significant impact on non-target marine species, highlights the need for a reevaluation of shark net programs. The episode emphasizes the importance of considering alternative technologies and conservation strategies to protect both beachgoers and marine biodiversity effectively.

The Minister of Environment in Australia, Penny Sharp, has privately voiced her support for ending the use of shark nets, a controversial issue that has sparked debate among advocates and government officials. Despite her private stance on the matter, Sharp has not publicly expressed her support for removing the shark nets, leading to frustration among conservationists and environmental groups.

The debate surrounding the effectiveness and ethical implications of shark nets has been ongoing, with concerns raised about the high number of non-target species, such as sea turtles, dolphins, and smaller sharks, that are caught and killed in the nets. A recent study revealed that more than 90% of marine animals caught in shark nets off New South Wales beaches were non-target species, including critically endangered gray nurse sharks and endangered sea turtles.

Advocates like Andre Burrell from the Envoy Foundation have called for more transparency and public engagement on the issue, emphasizing the need for government officials, including the Minister of Environment, to take a more active role in addressing the concerns surrounding shark nets. Burrell highlighted the importance of public advocacy and government leadership in moving towards alternative technologies or strategies to protect beachgoers while minimizing harm to marine wildlife.

The Minister of Environment's private support for ending the use of shark nets underscores the complexity of the issue and the need for a comprehensive review of current shark management practices. By openly addressing the concerns raised by conservationists and considering alternative approaches to shark mitigation, the Australian government can work towards a more sustainable and effective solution that balances the safety of beachgoers with the protection of marine biodiversity.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1604_90PercentOfSpeciesCaughtNonTargetedSpecies.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Luen discusses the concerning issue of small tooth sawfish dying in the Florida Keys. Listeners will learn about why this is happening, the rescue efforts in place, and how they can take action to help protect the ocean. Stay informed by signing up for the newsletter at speakupforblue.com/newsletter for more ocean-related stories, podcast updates, job opportunities, and news before it hits social media algorithms.

Link to article: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/rescue-endangered-sawfish-spinning-florida

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The small tooth sawfish population in the Florida Keys is facing a critical situation due to a mysterious fish ailment, leading to a high mortality rate among these endangered species. Protected under the Endangered Species Act since 2003, the sawfish are experiencing unprecedented mortality rates due to this unknown culprit. Conservation efforts are crucial to prevent potential catastrophic consequences.

The small tooth sawfish, the first marine fish to receive federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, has been slowly recovering thanks to conservation efforts. However, recent reports of sawfish spinning in circles and dying have raised concerns among marine biologists and conservationists.

The entire U.S. population of sawfish relies on Florida, particularly the Florida Keys, as a critical habitat. The urgency of the situation stems from the risk of losing a significant number of these animals, potentially undoing decades of conservation progress. Collaborative rescue initiatives involving private aquariums, nonprofits, and government agencies like NOAA Fisheries are working diligently to capture and provide care for the affected sawfish.

The cause of the mysterious fish ailment affecting the sawfish population is still under investigation. Possible factors such as elevated sea temperatures, water quality issues, parasites, or other environmental stressors could be contributing to the mortality of these endangered species. The rescue efforts involve monitoring hotlines, blood samples, tagging, and capturing the affected sawfish to provide them with care in controlled environments until the issue is resolved.

Conservation efforts for the small tooth sawfish are crucial to prevent further decline in their population and potential extinction. The collaborative efforts of various organizations and experts highlight the importance of protecting and preserving endangered species like the small tooth sawfish to maintain the biodiversity and health of marine ecosystems.

Elevated sea temperatures and poor water quality are likely contributing factors to the recent deaths of multiple fish species in Florida, including the small tooth sawfish. The episode highlights the concerning situation where these sawfish are exhibiting unusual behavior, spinning in circles before succumbing to a mysterious ailment. This behavior is not isolated to the sawfish, as a total of 57 species in Florida have displayed similar spinning behavior since November 2023.

The episode discusses the potential causes of these deaths, pointing towards factors such as elevated sea temperatures and poor water quality. Florida has experienced record-high sea temperatures, exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit, which can stress marine species and make them more susceptible to diseases. Additionally, the presence of harmful microscopic organisms like dinoflagellates or bacteria in the water could be contributing to the decline in fish populations.

The impact of these deaths extends beyond the immediate loss of individual fish. The small tooth sawfish, an endangered species, plays a crucial role in the ecosystem, and conservation efforts have been successful in slowly rebuilding their population. However, events like these mass deaths could reverse decades of conservation progress and have catastrophic consequences for the species.

Efforts are underway to rescue affected fish species, including the small tooth sawfish, by capturing them and bringing them into captivity for monitoring and care. Water quality samples are being taken to investigate the cause of these deaths and to prevent future occurrences. The episode emphasizes the importance of addressing the root causes of these events, such as elevated sea temperatures and poor water quality, to protect marine species and their habitats in Florida.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1593_SawfishSpinAndDie.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of "How to Protect the Ocean," host Andrew Lewinn discusses the mystery surrounding the disappearance of great white sharks in False Bay. He explores theories such as whether they were eaten, moved elsewhere, or if their food supply ran out. Andrew reveals that the mystery has been solved and dives into the conservation success stories of great white sharks in various regions around the world. The episode highlights the iconic nature of great whites and their population growth in protected areas. Andrew also mentions South Africa's role in capturing stunning footage of great white sharks breaching the water to catch seals.

Tune in to learn more about these fascinating creatures and how to advocate for ocean conservation.

Articles mentioned in this episode:
https://hakaimagazine.com/news/south-africas-missing-sharks-have-been-found/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0308597X20306370

 

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In this episode, the disappearance of great white sharks in South Africa, particularly in False Bay, is discussed. This disappearance has sparked concerns and led to various theories about the cause. The episode explores theories such as whether the sharks were eaten, if they relocated to another area, or if their food supply depleted. The decline of white sharks is described as dramatic, fast, and unprecedented, highlighting the urgency to understand the situation.

Furthermore, the episode reveals that the mystery of the great white shark disappearance in False Bay has been solved. Recent research indicates that the sharks did not perish but instead migrated across South Africa. The study found that the white shark population had shifted eastward. This shift is attributed to the presence of orcas, which are predators that influence the movement and habitat selection of their prey. It is suggested that the orcas pose a threat to the great white sharks, prompting them to relocate in order to avoid being hunted.

Overall, the episode delves into the disappearance of great white sharks in South Africa, the theories surrounding their vanishing, and the recent research suggesting that the sharks have relocated due to the presence of orcas.

Additionally, the episode mentions the phenomenon of great white sharks leaping out of the water, known as Air Jaws, which was filmed and documented in South Africa. This footage of great white sharks breaching to capture seals served as the inspiration for the creation of Shark Week by Discovery. Shark Week has become a popular television event for over 20 years, featuring episodes that explore sharks and their behavior. The episode suggests that Shark Week has greatly benefited from the filming of these episodes in South Africa, solidifying its significance in the entertainment industry.

There are concerns regarding the fishing industry in South Africa, specifically the shark meat industry, and its potential contribution to unsustainable fishing practices and the decline of great white sharks. The episode highlights that one of the greatest threats to sharks in South Africa is the shark meat industry, which exports a substantial amount of shark meat to European and Asian markets. It is suggested that Australia indirectly supports these unsustainable practices by consuming shark meat in their fish and chips market. The episode emphasizes the necessity for increased transparency within the fishing industry to track the destination of these products and address their potential impact on shark populations.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1510_SouthAfricanGreatWhiteSharkAbscenceMysterySolved.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Ecotourism can bring about some great benefits by educating visitors about the natural habitats found in a particular place and providing a revenue-generating service for local people. The type of ecotourism can range from kayak tours of mangroves to whale watching and can provide some great opportunities for tourists to connect with the wilderness. But some types of ecotourism can be considered dangerous and have checkered pasts which can make it difficult for new operations to open up in new places. A Great White Shark ecotourism company that is being operated by a shark scientist named Dr. Neil Hammershlag is running into criticism from scientists about the concern for the safety of the sharks and the people as well as concern for the fact that the company will be generating revenue while stating their intentions to study the science of the sharks. I discuss these concerns for this business venture on this episode.

Link to article: https://bit.ly/3V4y0fJ

SharkTagging.com: https://bit.ly/3Lm7Xxt

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1447_GWSharkEpiditioninNovaScotia.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

It seems as though the media salivates any time there is a shark bite event and it's labelled as a shark attack that includes all the horrific details. The story reaffirms the fears many people have of sharks and demonizes them, but there is always a piece of the story missing that could get at the real story. For example, a recent story that is being shared is a potential white shark bite off the coast of Mexico. The headlines and the stories are focusing on where the person was bit, but not on the details of why the person was in the ocean even though there were warnings of an increased presence of sharks. I am going to talk about the real story and discuss why those stories could have better results for conservation.
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1412_RealStoryBehindSharkBite.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

The health of ocean habitats is a delicate balance of the presence of the right species and the proper conditions. When things are out of balance the health of habitats can be at stake. Coral reef habitats act as a host for a diverse amount of species of invertebrates and vertebrates; however, the reefs are sensitive to physical and chemical changes which we often discuss on this podcast, but we rarely discuss the biological changes that can occur including the presence of predators and prey. There is an interesting article that reveals a decline of reef sharks that could affect the health of coral reefs.
 
Link to article: https://bit.ly/3ko6Vpx
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1408_ReefSharkDeclineCoralReefHealth.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

If a shark dies in the ocean, where do we find its remains? Well, there could be many answers to that question, but for many sharks, you could find their teeth in one place that we know. A deep-sea graveyard was discovered off some islands in the Indian Ocean by the ocean research arm of Australia, the CSIRO. The discovery contained teeth of various shark species ranging from mako sharks to the relatives of the now-extinct megalodon shark. Although scientists don't yet know why this graveyard was in this location, they look forward to diving into the shark teeth to find out. The latest research find from the same ship discovered a new deep-sea shark species, the stripey hornshark.
 
Link to article: https://bit.ly/3BtATOy
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1393_MegAndSharkGraveyard.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Shark populations are being targeted in international waters by fishing fleets using legal fishing gear...sort of. The gear can target sharks that are in high demand for their fins, meat, and organs. Tens of thousands of metric tons of sharks are being fished annually reducing some populations by at least 70%. The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission, which governs tuna fisheries in those waters could vote on a proposal to ban the devices as soon as this week in Vietnam. Research has shown that banning the devices could lead to a decreased mortality of oceanic whitetips by 40.5% and silky sharks by 30.8%.
 
I am going to break down the story and show you how this vote could easily help shark populations in international waters.
 
Link to article: http://bit.ly/3GX4JOZ
 
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A Greenland shark was found in the Caribbean Sea, surprising the science world and it begs the overall question: Have they always been there? But more research is needed to answer a number of questions. It also reminds us all that we know nothing of the deep sea and maybe we should hold off on opening up deep-sea mining since we don't really know the damage we could cause.
 
In this episode of the Speak Up For The Ocean Blue podcast, I am going to run through some of the questions I have on the Greenland shark distribution topic and provide my thoughts on why this should really halt any plans of deep-sea mining. 
 
Link to Article: https://bit.ly/3zYFbxn
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1338_DoGreenlandSharksFrequentCaribbeanSea.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 6:03pm EDT

Sharks have had a bad reputation for decades that have lead to their harm and lack of protection for a long time, but more videos and articles are surfacing that include love for sharks. But could all of this love be dangerous for shark populations as well?
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1333_CanLoveForSharksTurnBad.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Sharks are an iconic ocean animal that can strike fear and wonder in anyone that sees them and they are one of those animals that everyone would like to protect; but, most shark populations around the world have experienced drastic declines in population over the past 50 years and many people do not know how to go about protecting them; therefore, Dr. David Shiffman wrote a book to help guide you to better protect sharks and oceans.
 
In this episode, I speak to Dr. David Shiffman about his new book, Why Sharks Matter, to get the inside scoop on why he wrote a book that wasn't a textbook and how people can help better protect sharks.
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1310_WhySharksReallyMatter_DrDavidShiffman2.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Discovery's Shark Week is their biggest rating week of the year and is quite the spectacle. The shows aim to inspire people to learn about sharks and understand how they work; however, is the program effective at communicating the right information? 

A new scientific paper has been published to provide evidence that Shark Week has contained a lot of misinformation over the decades that they have been on TV. They also showed the lack of diversity in the hosts and the lack of experts in many of their programming. 

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Direct download: SUFB_S1190_IsSharkWeekHelpfulToSharkConservation.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Dr. David Ebert joins me on the podcast today to discuss four publications that went out in the last 5 weeks that name and describe a new shark species. These new shark species bring Dave's total described species to 50. 

Dave talks about the process of naming and describing species and describes the four new shark species. 

A couple of things that Dave is promoting today:
1) A new book: Sharks of the World - A complete guide
https://www.amazon.com/Sharks-World-Complete-Guide-Nature/dp/069120599X/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3SQ7LPP1WBTVB&dchild=1&keywords=sharks+of+the+world&qid=1626233963&sprefix=Sharks+of+the+world%2Caps%2C165&sr=8-1

2) A new Shark podcast: Beyond Jaws
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/beyond-jaws/id1576456233

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Direct download: SUFB_S1183_4NewSharkSpeciesDiscoveredAndDescribed.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

The Global Shark Population is declining all over the world; however, there is a way to protect using Marine Protected Areas in Exclusive Economic Zones. They are needed now more than ever since some sharks have a large migration and will venture out of MPA boundaries and into waters that are not protected. 

Link To Article: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/31/will-sharks-survive-scientists-fear-for-oceans-apex-predators-without-more-protection?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Direct download: SUFB_S1126_GlobalSharkPopulationsMPA.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Shark Finning still happens today and is shipped from all over the world to end up in Chinese markets. It's difficult to manage policies in a foreign country, but some countries can manage policies in their own EEZ if they know most of the shark fins are being collected in their waters. 

Melissa Marquez wrote an article in Forbes magazine (link below) where a couple of researchers from Florida International University created a DNA test for shark fins to determine where the fins were collected. What the study revealed will have implications in the management of some countries in terms of their shark protection policies. 

Listen to the episode to find out the details. 

Link to article: https://www.forbes.com/sites/melissacristinamarquez/2020/10/21/scientific-detective-work-tracking-shark-fins-around-the-globe/#13300e8a5e2d

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Direct download: SUFB_S1072_SharkFinTracking.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

There was a great news video on shark incidents on Reunion Island that showed the complexities of shark conservation when multiple ocean stakeholders are involved. The surfing community wants something done about the sharks, the environmentalists want to protect them and the government wants to appease everyone (but will probably make everyone mad at the same time). 

Link to Article: https://www.france24.com/en/france/20200612-hunt-down-sharks-to-protect-surfers-the-dilemma-facing-france-s-reunion-island

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Direct download: SUFB_S1021_ConservationTourismSurfingAndSharksOnReunionIsland.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Have you ever wondered why we only hear about shark finning when we discuss Shark Conservation? It seems to be the main narrative whenever you hear about Sharks and protecting them. However, there is more to Shark Conservation than finning.

Dr. Catherine MacDonald and Dr. David Shiffman are here to discuss the ramifications of only talking about one conservation effort to protect Sharks.

Check out their new paper: https://www.cell.com/iscience/fulltext/S2589-0042(20)30390-4

Tweet about it: https://twitter.com/WhySharksMatter/status/1273271361570590723

Discuss the paper with David and Catherine on Twitter:

David: @WhySharksMatter: https://twitter.com/WhySharksMatter

Catherine: @dr_catmac: https://twitter.com/dr_catmac

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Direct download: SUFB_S1019_SharkNarrative_copy.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Florida loves to fish! They love to fish for sharks from the beach. It's quite popular to fish for sharks from the beach in many parts of Florida. The fishing practice is a bit controversial as many anglers have been taking selfies with the sharks they catch. 

Why is that so controversial? The fishers are excited about what they caught. They followed the rules, for the most part; however, the act of taking a selfie many not be allowed anymore because it is not good for the shark.

The big problem with taking a photo with sharks on the beach is that the anglers will drag the sharks out of the water and hold them there for the perfect shot. sharks need water to breathe; therefore, holding the shark out of the water is torturing them. 

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has taken the advice by various shark scientists, policy makers and the conservation community and are getting ready to accept and implement rules of no photography of sharks after the catch. 

Take a listen to the episode for my thoughts on the matter and the challenges that come with this type of rule.

Note: Click here to listen to Dr. David Shiffman speak on why the rules are so important.

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Direct download: SUFB_S699_FloridaLooksToAddMoreProtectionsToSharksWithAnglers.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

Sharks are terrific predators, so much so, they have been found to eat their siblings while still in the womb. Researchers at the Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Motobu, Japan, used an underwater ultrasound to see nurse shark pups jumping in and out of their respective uterus in the mother.

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Direct download: SUFB_S662_BabySharksJumpUteriToEatTheirSiblings.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00pm EDT

As Shark Week is on it's way, I thought it would be great to get our friend of the podcast, Dr. Dave Ebert (aka @lostsharkguy) on the podcast to discuss his journey to the wonderful island of Sri Lanka to discover more sharks.

If you are not familiar with Dave's work, he discovers and studies new shark, ray and chimera species. It's quite amazing what his team has accomplished over the past few decades and will accomplish in the next few decades as well.

If you like sharks, take a listen to this episode as Dave journeyed to Sri Lanka to discover new sharks.

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Direct download: SUFB_S513_FindingNewSharksInSriLankaWithDrDaveEbert.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 4:00pm EDT

Dr. Austin Gallagher is someone who never stops in this Marine Science and Conservation Industry. He conducts research on sharks and other predators all over the world, he founded and leads a non-profit organization called Beneath The Waves; and, he is now a social entrepreneur that quenches your thirst with Tempo, an all organic no sweetener sparkling tea that is built to be good for the Ocean.

I am truly honoured to have Austin as my guest today where he tells us about all of his ventures including working with his team to tag hammerhead sharks in Japan with a free diver and professional surfer. 

You.Do.Not.Want.To.Miss.This.Episode!!!

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Direct download: SUFB_S392_MarineScienceAndEntrepreneurismWithAustinGallagher.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

Shark advocates and scientists strive for the same cause: protect sharks from their rapid global decrease in population. However, advocates and scientists don't always agree on the methods. Some people want all finning and fishing of all sharks to stop completely. Others feel it's more realistic to have some sustainable shark fisheries and want to ban finning altogether. A current proposed bill in Congress that will ban finning of any kind is testing the relationship among some advocates and scientists. 

Debate on the methods of science, conservation and protection is healthy. What is NOT healthy is the personal attacks after heated debates online. Personal attacks do not help move ideas forward. They do the opposite. They further divide the rational line of compromise and agreements. 

I discuss this in our second story of this episode because advocates are personally attacking a researcher for their stance on the proposed bill to ban the sale of all fins in the US. 

Listen to the podcast and let me know how you feel this issue could have been solved in our Facebook Group.

Also on the podcast: 
1) Thousands of fish, including 1,000-2,000 leopard sharks die in San Francisco Bay; and,
2) An alliance is formed to track the distribution line to eliminate illegal fishing in our global seafood market.

Let me know what you think of the episode by joining our Facebook Group for the Podcast.

This episode was brought to you by Octo (Open Communications for The Oceans). Check out their recent MEAM (Marine Ecosystem And Management) issue helping inform the Marine Science and Conservation field around the world.

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Direct download: SUFB_S379_ProtectingSharksAndThePeopleWhoStudyThem.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

There is a big problem in San Francisco Bay: A number of sharks and other fish are washing ashore dead. Sean van Sommeran is on the front lines making sure each fish is processed and analyzed to find out why. 

Sean's organization, The Pelagic Shark Research Foundation, is partnering with the Marine Mammal Center and some researchers who specialize in fish health to help determine why a number of different sharks such as leopard sharks, white sharks and other fish (eagle rays, etc.) are washing up on the shore dead. 

These strandings have bee occurring for the past 5-6 weeks and it's not the first time this type of stranding event has occurred.

Listen to the podcast to hear more on why these sharks and other fish are dying this spring. 

Enjoy the podcast!

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Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

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Direct download: SUFB_S311_SharkStrandingsInSFBayWithSeanvanSommeran.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

Rick MacPherson joins me on the podcast to talk about Marine Conservation in Small Island Communities and Sustainable Shark Tourism. I wanted Rick on the podcast ever since I started recording the first episode. I am so glad he was able to join us to discuss how conservation is done on small island communities and how sustainable shark tourism should be conducted. 

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Enjoy the podcast!

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

Direct download: SUFB_S293_WorkingWithCommunitiesToProtectTheOceanWithRickMacPherson.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

Have you ever heard of a shark being stranded? Well it happens more often than you think. Sean van Sommeran knows all about it too because he has monitoring California beaches for more than 3 decades. 

Sean approached me last week about a recent shark stranded in which the Marine Mammal Center found. Sean is responsible for determining what happened to the shark to prevent more occurrences from happening and to determine the cause.

Listen to Sean as we discuss shark strandings, their causes and how a recent incident at a Huttington Beach pier in not the first event.

Enjoy the podcast!

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

Direct download: SharkStrandingsAndPierFishingWithSeanSommeran.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

SUFB 260: Monitoring Pelagic Sharks With Sean van Sommeran

My first interview of 2017 HAD to be about sharks!!! Sean van Sommeran is the Executive Director at the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation. Sean and I discuss what he observed in sharks over the past 35 years along the coast of California and other places like Canada and Chile.

We often hear about the popular shark species such as great whites, tiger sharks, bull sharks and hammerhead sharks; however, Sean talks about shark species such as the basking sharks and leopard sharks. It's fun to talk different shark species with someone who has studied them for so long and has been involved in establishing one of the first shark conservation organizations back in 1990.   

Enjoy the podcast!

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

Direct download: SUFB_S260_MonitoringPelagicSharksWithSeanvanSommeran.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

Dr. David Shiffman is a newly graduated Phd scientist specializing in shark ecology and conservation and is quite the science communications super star. He shares is knowledge and passion for shark science with thousands of his followers on Twitter and Facebook. 

We are fortunate to have David chat to us about his number one Ocean passion of sharks and discuss his PhD dissertation as well as his strategies for science communication.

Enjoy the podcast!

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

Direct download: SUFB_S254_WhySharksMatterWithDavidShiffman.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

I am so happy to be bale to provide this interview for you with Jillian Morris. She is a great biologist, videographer, educator and conservationist. Jillian tells us how she got to where she is today from childhood playtime in the ocean and seeing her first in-person shark when she was 8 to filming them at close range to change the perspective of shark behaviour in kids all over the worlds. 

We also discuss how she started Sharks 4 Kids and how she teaches different age groups about sharks. 

 

10 Ocean Tips to Conserve the Ocean:

http://www.speakupforblue.com/wordpress/sufb_optinpdf

Direct download: SUFB_S160_SharkEducationWithJillianMorris.mp3
Category:Sharks -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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