How To Protect The Ocean (Plastic Pollution)

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S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

Andrew Lewin discusses the recent ban on intentional balloon releases in Florida. While highlighting the positive step for environmental protection, he also delves into the nuances of the ban. Despite a brief episode due to holiday celebrations, Andrew emphasizes the importance of speaking up for the ocean and taking action for a better marine ecosystem.

Link to article: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2024/06/25/balloon-release-ban-florida-desantis/74202568007/

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Florida's recent passing of a bill to ban the intentional release of balloons marks a significant step towards protecting the environment, particularly ocean wildlife. The bill, known as House Bill 321, aims to prevent the harmful impact of released balloons on marine life. Balloons, when released, often end up in the ocean, where they pose a serious threat to marine animals like sea turtles and birds.

The ban on intentional balloon releases in Florida is part of a larger movement seen in several states across the US, including California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Virginia. These states have either passed or proposed legislation to limit or ban balloon releases outdoors. The detrimental effects of balloons on wildlife have prompted these proactive measures to safeguard the environment.

The bill in Florida classifies the intentional release of balloons inflated with gas lighter than air as littering. This classification emphasizes the environmental impact of releasing balloons, especially those filled with helium. Oceana, a nonprofit conservation organization, has supported the bill, highlighting its importance in protecting Florida's coastlines and ocean wildlife from preventable harm.

The legislation also introduces penalties for those who intentionally release balloons, with fines ranging from $150 to $1,000, depending on the weight of the balloons. While there are exemptions for biodegradable balloons made of natural latex, the bill removes previous exemptions for balloons deemed biodegradable or photodegradable by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

The bill's emphasis on promoting greener alternatives to balloon releases, such as bubbles, kites, planting trees, or creating memorial gardens, underscores the importance of responsible environmental practices. By encouraging eco-friendly celebrations, the legislation aims to raise awareness about the impact of balloon releases on wildlife and ecosystems.

Overall, Florida's ban on intentional balloon releases reflects a growing awareness of the need to protect the environment and marine life from plastic pollution. The legislation serves as a crucial step towards fostering a more sustainable and environmentally conscious approach to celebrations and events, ultimately contributing to the preservation of ocean ecosystems and wildlife.

The new law in Florida regarding the intentional release of balloons is a significant step towards protecting the environment, particularly ocean wildlife. The law classifies the intentional release of balloons inflated with gas lighter than air as littering. This means that releasing balloons filled with helium or other lighter-than-air gases is now considered a violation, subject to fines. The fines for violating this law can range from $150 for regular balloons to up to $1,000 for balloons over 15 pounds.

This legislation is a crucial move to prevent the harmful impact of balloons on wildlife, especially marine animals. When balloons are released into the environment, they can end up in bodies of water, where marine animals mistake them for food. Ingesting balloons can lead to serious health issues and even death for these animals. By imposing fines for releasing balloons filled with lighter-than-air gases, Florida aims to reduce the littering of balloons and protect ocean wildlife from preventable harm.

The law also highlights the importance of promoting eco-friendly alternatives to balloon releases. Floridians are encouraged to opt for greener choices such as bubbles, kites, planting trees, or creating memorial gardens instead of releasing balloons. These alternatives not only provide a more environmentally friendly way to celebrate but also help in preserving the natural habitats of wildlife.

Overall, the new law in Florida signifies a positive step towards environmental conservation and wildlife protection. By addressing the issue of balloon littering and imposing fines for violations, the state is taking proactive measures to safeguard its coastlines and ocean wildlife. This legislation serves as a reminder of the importance of responsible behavior and the need to prioritize the well-being of the environment and its inhabitants.

Alternatives to Balloon Releases

In the podcast episode, it was highlighted that balloon releases can have detrimental effects on the environment, particularly on wildlife. To combat this issue, the state of Florida has implemented a ban on intentional balloon releases. However, the episode also emphasized the importance of providing alternative, more environmentally friendly options for celebrations and events.

One of the key points discussed was the encouragement of using alternatives to balloon releases. Some of the suggested alternatives included bubbles, kites, planting trees, and creating memorial gardens. These alternatives not only provide a similar celebratory effect but also have minimal to no negative impact on the environment.

  • Bubbles: Bubbles are a fun and whimsical alternative to balloons. They are non-toxic, biodegradable, and do not pose a threat to wildlife if accidentally released into the environment. Children and adults alike can enjoy the beauty of bubbles without harming the ecosystem.

  • Kites: Flying kites can be a thrilling and visually appealing activity for celebrations. Kites are reusable, durable, and do not contribute to pollution. They offer a sustainable way to enjoy the outdoors and create memorable moments without endangering wildlife.

  • Planting Trees: Planting trees as a celebratory gesture or in memory of a loved one is a meaningful and eco-friendly alternative to balloon releases. Trees provide numerous environmental benefits, such as oxygen production, carbon sequestration, and habitat for wildlife. This option promotes sustainability and contributes positively to the ecosystem.

  • Creating Memorial Gardens: Establishing memorial gardens can serve as a lasting tribute while also benefiting the environment. These gardens can be dedicated to honoring individuals or events and can include native plants, flowers, and shrubs. Memorial gardens promote biodiversity, attract pollinators, and enhance the beauty of outdoor spaces without generating harmful waste.

By promoting these alternatives, individuals and communities can shift towards more sustainable and environmentally conscious practices during celebrations and events. Choosing bubbles, kites, tree planting, or memorial gardens over balloon releases not only reduces plastic pollution but also fosters a deeper connection to nature and promotes conservation efforts.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1631_FloridaBansBalloonRelease.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

On this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin is joined by Anthony Merante, Oceana Canada's senior plastic campaigner, to discuss the results of the UN Global Plastic Treaty's INC4 meeting held in Ottawa. Dive behind the scenes of the meeting and learn about the goals and outcomes of this significant event. Discover what actions are being taken to protect the ocean and how you can get involved in creating a better future for our oceans.

Listen now to stay informed and inspired to make a difference!

Check out the last episode where Anthony was interviewed before the UN Global Tratey meeting: https://www.speakupforblue.com/show/speak-up-for-the-ocean-blue/show-179/

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The INC meeting for the UN Global Plastic Treaty in Ottawa brought together representatives from over 170 countries to negotiate the terms of the treaty. This meeting marked the fourth out of five sessions held in Ottawa, Canada, where countries collaborated to develop a global plastics treaty. The negotiations revealed significant divisions among countries, with some expressing ambitious goals while others were more conservative in their approach. Previous meetings in Budapest, Paris, and Nairobi set the foundation for the discussions in Ottawa, where progress was made, albeit not as swiftly as anticipated.

Throughout the INC meeting, various contact groups were established to concentrate on key aspects of the treaty, such as setting production caps, phasing out harmful chemicals, and addressing single-use plastics. The negotiations delved into intricate topics like product design, the elimination of non-recyclable polymers, and the management of chemicals in plastics that pose risks to human health and the environment. Financial mechanisms and implementation strategies were also discussed to ensure fair execution of the treaty across different nations.

The presence of lobbyists from the fossil fuel and chemical industries at the meeting aimed to advocate for their interests in the negotiations. These lobbyists emphasized the significance of plastics in various sectors, including healthcare and food packaging, to influence the negotiators. Conversely, environmental groups like Oceana Canada engaged in lobbying efforts to push for ambitious objectives in the treaty, focusing on reducing plastic pollution and promoting sustainable solutions.

The INC meeting in Ottawa underscored the intricate and challenging nature of negotiating a global plastics treaty involving over 170 countries. The discussions covered a wide array of topics, from production limits to product design and the health concerns associated with plastics. The involvement of diverse stakeholders, including environmental groups and industry representatives, enriched the discussions and ensured a balanced approach to tackling the issues posed by plastic pollution on a global scale.

Lobbying efforts from both environmental groups and industry associations played a significant role in influencing the negotiations during the UN Global Plastic Treaty meetings. Environmental groups, such as Oceana Canada, actively lobbied for ambitious goals within the treaty, advocating for regulations on plastic production, the phasing out of non-recyclable polymers, and the promotion of refill and reuse practices. On the other hand, industry associations, including companies like Dow Chemical, Exxon, Shell, BP, and Formosa, participated in lobbying activities to express their concerns about the potential negative impacts of the treaty on business, the environment, and the economy.

The government of Canada adopted a balanced approach by considering perspectives from both environmental groups and industry associations. Stakeholder engagements, roundtable discussions, and meetings provided a platform for these groups to present their viewpoints side by side, fostering a transparent exchange of ideas. Environmental groups utilized these opportunities to question industry associations on their sustainability initiatives, recycling efforts, and waste management practices.

The involvement of environmental groups and industry associations in the negotiations ensured a comprehensive discussion on the complexities of plastic pollution and the necessary measures to address it. Through lobbying activities, these stakeholders influenced the negotiation process, highlighted key issues, and advocated for their interests within the framework of the UN Global Plastic Treaty meetings.

Transparency in plastic production and waste management is crucial for ensuring accountability among businesses and governments. The federal government of Canada's release of a federal registry of plastics, covering the entire lifecycle of plastic products, allows for tracking of production, usage, and disposal. This level of transparency promotes accountability and facilitates informed decision-making.

Consumer-facing companies like Coca-Cola, McDonald's, and Pepsi have been advocating for regulations within the Global Plastic Treaty negotiations, supporting measures such as phasing out non-recyclable polymers and promoting refill and reuse practices. On the other hand, non-consumer facing companies, such as Dow Chemical, Exxon, and Shell, have been more resistant to transparency and accountability in the plastic industry. However, with increasing awareness of the environmental impacts of plastic pollution, there is a growing need for these companies to be more transparent about their practices.

Overall, transparency in plastic production and waste management is essential for holding businesses and governments accountable. By providing clear information on plastic usage and waste disposal, stakeholders can work towards sustainable solutions for managing plastic pollution. This transparency fosters a culture of accountability, encouraging businesses to adopt environmentally friendly practices and take responsibility for their impact on the environment.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1611_INC4REsults_AnthonyMerante.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Tune in to this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast to hear from Anthony Marente, the senior campaigner for Oceanic Canada, discussing the upcoming INC4 meeting in Ottawa as part of the UN Global Plastic Treaty. Discover the history of the treaty, previous meetings, and the expectations for this crucial gathering. Learn about the global efforts to combat plastic pollution and what we can do to protect our oceans.

Ocean Canada: https://oceana.ca/en/our-campaigns/plastics/

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Plastic pollution is a global issue with significant impacts on human health and the environment. The episode transcript sheds light on the widespread presence of plastic pollution in various ecosystems worldwide, from beaches to rivers to forests. The harmful effects of plastic pollution extend beyond the physical environment to human health.

The episode discusses how plastic pollution has resulted in the presence of microplastics in the air, water, and even in human bloodstreams. These microplastics contain chemicals linked to health issues such as cancers, respiratory illnesses, hormone disruption, and fertility impacts. The presence of these harmful substances poses a significant risk to human populations, especially those living near petrochemical plants and waste disposal sites.

Moreover, the episode underscores the connection between plastic pollution and human health by highlighting the transmission of microplastics from pregnant mothers to unborn children. This transmission through the placenta can have long-term implications for future generations' health, emphasizing the need to address plastic pollution as a public health concern.

The episode also addresses the disproportionate impact of plastic pollution on marginalized communities, such as Indigenous populations and residents of low-income areas. These communities often face elevated health risks due to plastic waste mismanagement, leading to higher cancer rates, respiratory issues, and other disparities. This highlights the importance of environmental justice and equitable solutions to address the health impacts of plastic pollution.

In conclusion, the episode stresses the urgent need for global action to combat plastic pollution, safeguarding both the environment and human health. By addressing the root causes of plastic pollution, implementing upstream measures, and promoting sustainable waste management practices, countries can work towards mitigating the health risks associated with plastic pollution and creating a healthier, more sustainable future for all.

The upcoming INC4 meeting in Ottawa is crucial for advancing the Global Plastic Treaty, part of the United Nations' efforts to tackle plastic pollution globally. The treaty aims to create a legally binding instrument involving all nations to end plastic pollution, particularly in the marine environment. Previous INC meetings have laid the groundwork for this treaty, with discussions focusing on ambitious measures like bans, prohibitions, and phase-outs of plastics.

However, the INC3 meeting in Kenya faced challenges in negotiations due to low ambition countries heavily reliant on oil and gas industries, such as Russia, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. These countries hindered progress by introducing obstacles in the negotiation process.

The INC4 meeting in Ottawa presents an opportunity to overcome these challenges and move towards a final, legally binding international treaty to address plastic pollution. The meeting will bring together representatives from various countries, environmental NGOs, health organizations, and industry stakeholders to negotiate the terms of the treaty. It is crucial for high ambition countries to maintain their stance and advocate for impactful measures to address plastic pollution.

As a senior campaigner for Oceania Canada, Anthony Marente's role at the INC4 meeting will be to publicize the government's stance on plastic pollution and advocate for high ambition measures. He will collaborate with civil society groups, meet with government officials, and provide resources to support informed decision-making. The meeting in Ottawa serves as a platform for global collaboration and action to address the urgent issue of plastic pollution and protect both the environment and human health.

Collaboration between governments, NGOs, and civil society is crucial for effective action against plastic pollution. In the podcast episode, Anthony Marente, the senior campaigner for Oceanic Canada, emphasizes the importance of various stakeholders coming together to address the global plastic pollution crisis.

  1. Government Involvement: Governments play a significant role in setting regulations and policies to combat plastic pollution. They have the power to implement bans, prohibitions, and phase-outs of single-use plastics. Collaboration with NGOs and civil society is crucial to push for more ambitious measures, especially when conflicting interests arise due to ties to the oil and gas industry.

  2. NGO Participation: NGOs like Environmental Defense Canada, David Suzuki Foundation, and Ecojustice Canada have expanded their focus to address the human health impacts of plastic pollution. These organizations bring valuable resources, research, and expertise to inform decision-making processes.

  3. Civil Society Engagement: Civil society, including indigenous communities, healthcare workers, waste management experts, and concerned citizens, play a vital role in combating plastic pollution. Their diverse perspectives and grassroots knowledge ensure that policies are inclusive and equitable.

  4. Global Collaboration: The international nature of the plastic pollution problem requires global collaboration. International meetings like the INC4 in Ottawa provide a platform for countries to share knowledge and work towards reducing plastic pollution.

  5. Resource Sharing: Collaboration allows for the sharing of resources, information, and best practices. NGOs can provide governments with data on the health impacts of plastic pollution, successful case studies of waste management initiatives, and innovative solutions for reducing plastic usage. Civil society can offer insights into community needs and environmental justice issues.

In conclusion, collaboration between governments, NGOs, and civil society is essential for developing comprehensive strategies to tackle plastic pollution effectively. By working together, sharing resources, and leveraging their strengths, these stakeholders can drive meaningful change and create a more sustainable future for the planet.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1598_UNGlobalPlasticTreatyINC4OceanaCanada.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses the potential of replacing plastic with a sustainable substance found in shellfish. Imagine a world where everyday items are eco-friendly and do not harm the environment when disposed of. Join us to explore this innovative solution to plastic pollution and learn how we can all contribute to a healthier ocean.

Link to article: https://www.anthropocenemagazine.org/2024/03/experts-unlock-the-vast-potential-of-seafood-waste-without-the-toxic-after-effects/

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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Chitin, a substance found in the shells of seafood shellfish, has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional plastic. Researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a method to extract chitin from crabs, lobsters, and other crustaceans. Historically, chitin extraction has been challenging due to the use of harmful substances like hydrochloric acid, which can harm the environment. However, the researchers have found a more sustainable approach using non-toxic and biocompatible byproducts from the biodiesel industry.

This breakthrough is significant because chitin-based products could offer a more environmentally friendly solution to plastic pollution. Chitin-based materials have the potential to break down more easily in the environment, reducing the harmful impact on ecosystems. With approximately six million tons of seafood waste generated in the US alone each year, there is a vast potential source of chitin that could be repurposed into sustainable products.

The innovative extraction process involves using organic acids like glycerol, choline chloride, lactic acid, or malic acid to separate chitin from the shellfish material. This method not only makes chitin extraction more efficient but also eliminates the use of corrosive substances that harm the environment. The resulting chitin can be used as a biodegradable replacement for petroleum-based plastics, offering a more sustainable option for various products.

Furthermore, the researchers are exploring additional applications for chitin, such as turning salvaged chitin into nutrient-rich fertilizer for crops. This demonstrates the versatility and potential value of chitin as a sustainable resource. The episode emphasizes the importance of investing in innovative research projects like this to drive positive change and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels.

Researchers have made a groundbreaking discovery in finding a more environmentally friendly way to extract chitin from shellfish, making it a viable option for plastic production. Traditionally, extracting chitin from shellfish has been a challenging and polluting process, involving the use of harmful substances like hydrochloric acid. However, a lab at the University of Connecticut has found a new method that utilizes non-toxic, biocompatible, and cost-effective byproducts of the biodiesel industry, such as choline chloride, glycerol, and organic acids.

This innovative approach involves creating a solvent rich in hydrogen bonds that can break down the original bond in the shellfish material, enabling the separation and release of chitin from other compounds in the shells' complex matrix. This method not only makes the extraction process more efficient but also eliminates the harmful environmental impacts associated with traditional extraction methods.

With this new extraction process, chitin can now be obtained sustainably from the shells of crabs, lobsters, crustaceans, and shrimp. This discovery opens up a world of possibilities for using chitin as a biodegradable replacement for petroleum-based plastics. The potential applications of chitin in plastic production are vast, offering a more sustainable alternative that breaks down harmlessly in the environment.

Furthermore, researchers are exploring additional uses for chitin, such as turning salvaged chitin into a nutrient-rich fertilizer for crops. This demonstrates the versatility and value of chitin as a resource that can be repurposed into valuable products, contributing to a more circular and sustainable economy.

Overall, this discovery represents a significant step towards reducing plastic pollution and transitioning towards more eco-friendly alternatives in plastic production. By investing in innovative research like this, we can pave the way for a more sustainable future and reduce our reliance on fossil fuels for plastic manufacturing.

Governments play a crucial role in driving innovation towards more sustainable practices and reducing reliance on fossil fuels. As discussed in the podcast episode, investing in innovative projects like the use of chitin to create sustainable products presents a significant opportunity for governments to lead the way in environmental conservation. Chitin, extracted from seafood waste, offers a biodegradable alternative to petroleum-based plastics, addressing the pressing issue of plastic pollution.

By investing in research and development of chitin-based products, governments can support the transition towards a more sustainable economy. This investment not only fosters technological advancements but also promotes job creation and economic growth in emerging industries focused on sustainability. Furthermore, the utilization of chitin in various applications, such as packaging and fertilizers, demonstrates the versatility and potential of this natural resource.

Governments should prioritize funding for projects that explore innovative solutions like chitin-based products. By supporting these initiatives, policymakers can demonstrate a commitment to environmental stewardship and climate action. Additionally, investing in sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels aligns with global efforts to mitigate climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Overall, government investment in projects utilizing chitin and other sustainable materials is essential for driving the transition towards a more environmentally friendly and sustainable future. By supporting research, development, and implementation of these innovative solutions, governments can play a pivotal role in creating a more sustainable and resilient society for future generations.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1597_ChitinReplacementForPetroleumPlastic.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

On this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin delves into the issue of plastic recycling and greenwashing. He highlights the prevalence of ocean plastic pollution and the challenges associated with cleaning it up. The episode exposes the deceptive practices of some retailers, like Amazon, in falsely claiming the recyclability of packaging materials.

Tune in to learn more about the complexities of recycling and how individuals can take action to protect the ocean.

Link to article: https://grist.org/accountability/amazon-says-its-plastic-packaging-can-be-recycled-an-investigation-finds-it-usually-isnt/

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One of the key issues highlighted in the podcast episode is the discrepancy between Amazon's recycling claims regarding packaging and the actual recycling rates. Despite Amazon's packaging often displaying labels indicating recyclability, studies have revealed that only a small fraction of plastic packaging actually gets recycled. This discrepancy raises concerns about the accuracy and transparency of Amazon's recycling practices.

The podcast discusses how consumers often receive packages from Amazon with packaging that states it is recyclable. However, investigations have shown that a significant portion of this packaging does not end up being recycled as intended. Instead, some of the plastic packaging may be sent to landfills, waste stations, incinerators, or even exported to countries with inadequate recycling infrastructure.

The episode highlights the efforts of environmental organizations and individuals, such as Jane Dell, who have conducted their own studies to track the fate of Amazon's plastic packaging. These studies have revealed that the store drop-off system, which Amazon promotes for recycling, may not be as effective as claimed. In fact, the podcast mentions that Dell has not traced a single bundle of film labeled for store drop-off to U.S. facilities capable of recycling it into new products.

Furthermore, the podcast emphasizes the importance of holding companies like Amazon accountable for their recycling claims. While Amazon has stated that it has no control over how its packaging is handled once disposed of by municipalities or recycling centers, there is a growing call for companies to take responsibility for the end-of-life management of their packaging materials.

The episode also discusses potential legislative actions that may push companies like Amazon to improve their recycling practices. For example, in California, a truth in advertising law signed in 2021 may restrict the use of store drop-off labels unless companies can prove the effectiveness of the recycling system. Additionally, there are laws being considered that would require a certain percentage of single-use plastic packaging to be demonstrably recycled by a specific deadline.

Overall, the podcast sheds light on the discrepancy between Amazon's recycling claims and the actual recycling rates of its plastic packaging. It underscores the need for greater transparency, accountability, and improvement in recycling practices within the e-commerce industry to address the growing issue of plastic pollution.

Legislation and government regulations play a crucial role in holding companies like Amazon accountable for their packaging waste and pushing for more sustainable practices. In the podcast episode, it was highlighted that companies often engage in greenwashing, where they make false claims about the recyclability of their packaging. Despite labels indicating that packaging is recyclable, investigations revealed that a significant portion of Amazon's plastic packaging does not end up being recycled as claimed.

To address this issue, government intervention becomes essential. For instance, in California, a truth in advertising law signed in 2021 may soon restrict the use of store drop-off labels unless companies can prove the effectiveness of the recycling system. Additionally, a separate law in California will require single-use plastic packaging to be demonstrably recycled at least 65% of the time by 2032. These regulations set a standard for companies to follow and incentivize them to adopt more sustainable practices.

Furthermore, the podcast mentioned that Amazon has taken steps to reduce plastic use in response to regulations in Europe and India banning certain categories of single-use plastic. This demonstrates that companies are more likely to make changes when laws require them to do so. The episode also discussed the importance of companies being accountable for the environmental impact of their packaging waste, emphasizing the need for tracking systems and responsible disposal practices.

In conclusion, while individual efforts to reduce plastic waste are important, government regulations are necessary to ensure that companies like Amazon prioritize sustainability and take responsibility for their packaging waste. By implementing and enforcing legislation, governments can drive significant changes in the industry towards more sustainable practices and reduce the environmental impact of packaging waste.

Consumers play a crucial role in addressing environmental concerns related to plastic packaging, as highlighted in the podcast episode. The episode discussed how Amazon's plastic packaging, despite being labeled as recyclable, often does not end up being recycled effectively. This raises questions about the accountability of companies like Amazon in managing their plastic waste. As consumers, we have the power to influence change through our purchasing habits.

One key takeaway from the episode is the need for consumers to consider their reliance on Amazon and other companies that contribute significantly to plastic pollution. While Amazon offers convenience and a wide range of products, the environmental impact of its packaging practices cannot be ignored. By reducing reliance on Amazon and opting for more sustainable alternatives, consumers can send a strong message to companies about the importance of responsible packaging practices.

The episode also highlighted the importance of holding companies accountable for their environmental impact. Amazon's response to regulations in Europe and India banning single-use plastic packaging demonstrates that companies are more likely to take action when faced with legal requirements. This underscores the significance of government regulations in driving sustainable practices within the industry.

In light of the challenges associated with Amazon's plastic packaging, consumers may need to reevaluate their purchasing habits. This could involve exploring alternative retailers that prioritize sustainable packaging practices, supporting local businesses that use eco-friendly packaging, or opting for products with minimal packaging. By making conscious choices and advocating for sustainable practices, consumers can contribute to reducing plastic pollution and promoting a healthier environment.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1588_AmazonRecyclingNotWhatItSeems.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin interviews Joseph Barnes, a recent Master's graduate from American University, about his research on microplastic behavior in the Potomac River. 

They discuss the abundance of microplastics based on seasons and the presence of organisms, as well as how microplastics are used within the ecosystem.

Tune in to learn more about this important topic and how we can protect the ocean from the impacts of microplastics.

Link to Joseph's paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e23239

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Joe is a passionate advocate for addressing the issue of microplastics and is known for his enthusiastic and fiery approach. The podcast host acknowledges Joe's dedication and describes him as someone who always brings the fire when discussing microplastics and plastics in general. Joe's desire to make a difference and contribute to solving the microplastics problem is emphasized. The host expresses excitement about Joe's career and looks forward to having him back on the podcast multiple times to discuss his work. It is evident that Joe's commitment to addressing microplastics is unwavering and his passion is palpable.

The podcast host expresses genuine excitement about Joe's career and expresses a desire to follow his journey and invite him back on the show multiple times to delve into his work. This indicates that Joe has been a valuable guest on the podcast, sharing valuable insights and expertise, likely related to microplastics. The host appreciates Joe's passion for addressing the microplastics issue and his determination to make a positive impact. They anticipate that Joe will continue to make significant contributions in his field, and they are eager to continue featuring his work on the podcast. This highlights Joe's high regard and expertise in the field of microplastics.

In this episode, the host Andrew Lewin introduces the topic of microplastics and focuses on their behavior in rivers. He acknowledges that there is still much research needed to fully understand how microplastics behave in the ecosystem and how organisms interact with them. To shed light on this topic, he invites Joseph Barnes, a recent graduate from American University, who conducted a research project on microplastic behavior in the Potomac River in Washington.

According to Barnes, microplastics have the ability to bioaccumulate throughout the food web. This means that they can be ingested by algae, which are then consumed by invertebrates, and so on. As microplastics move up the food chain, they can become a significant problem. Barnes suggests that if mammals or fish in the river show a high accumulation of microplastics or remnants of microplastics in their systems, it could indicate a concerning level of contamination.

Lewin also highlights the unique nature of microplastics in rivers compared to other sources of pollution. While discharges from industries are often regulated and controlled point sources, microplastics are less predictable. They can originate from various sources, making it challenging to determine when and where they will enter the river. Barnes's research focused on studying the interaction between microplastics and microorganisms in the river, rather than identifying their specific sources.

Overall, this episode delves into the behavior of microplastics in rivers and emphasizes the potential risks they pose to organisms within the ecosystem.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1555_PlasticPollution.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses the Canadian government's efforts to tackle plastic pollution. He explains that the government has implemented a ban on certain single-use plastics and is now planning to create a federal plastics registry. The registry will require companies to track and report their plastic production, as well as the lifecycle of their products.

This will help to hold companies accountable for their plastic waste and move Canada towards a circular economy for plastics. Andrew highlights the importance of tracking and managing plastics, as the majority of plastic waste in Canada ends up in landfills or the natural environment. He also discusses the potential economic impact of the registry on companies. 

Overall, Andrew believes that the federal plastics registry is an important tool for addressing plastic pollution and encourages listeners to share their thoughts on the issue.

Link to article: https://www.ctvnews.ca/climate-and-environment/feds-open-plastics-registry-consultations-in-move-to-eventually-track-waste-1.6708502

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The Canadian federal government has taken a significant step towards addressing plastic pollution by calling for the establishment of a plastics registry. This registry aims to track the companies and types of plastics they produce, as well as monitor their lifecycle within the marketplace and their final destinations after use. The purpose of this registry is to regulate plastics more effectively and reduce plastic pollution in Canada.

Plastic pollution is a pressing issue that affects not only Canada but also the entire world. Plastics have permeated every part of the ocean, with microplastics found in both surface and deep-sea waters. This widespread pollution has harmful effects on marine animals, water chemistry, and human health. Recognizing the severity of the problem, various countries, including Canada, have been implementing policies and regulations to control plastic production and usage.

The Canadian government's efforts to tackle plastic pollution began in 2018 when they announced plans to ban certain single-use plastics, such as straws, utensils, and coffee stir sticks. These bans are being phased in gradually, and by 2022, these items will no longer be allowed to be imported, exported, or produced in Canada. These bans were made possible by classifying plastics as toxins under the Canadian Protections Act, giving the government the authority to regulate them.

However, a recent court ruling challenged the classification of plastics as toxins, but the ban remains in place while the government appeals the ruling. In the meantime, the government is moving forward with the creation of a federal plastics registry. This registry will require companies to track and report their plastic production, providing valuable data on the amount and types of plastics being produced. It will also monitor the lifecycle of these plastics, from production to disposal, and identify any gaps or missing information.

The registry will be implemented in phases, with some sectors, such as packaging and electrical equipment, required to report their plastic production first. Other sectors, like agriculture and textiles, will follow suit at a later date. The registry will collect information on plastics placed on the market, plastics collected for diversion, reuse, remanufacturing, repair, recycling, and recovery for energy. This comprehensive approach will enable a better understanding of the entire lifecycle of plastics and help identify areas for improvement.

Plastics have become a major pollution problem, with microplastics found throughout the ocean, affecting animals, water chemistry, and human health. The episode highlights that plastic pollution has reached a critical level, with plastics being present in every part of the ocean. This is concerning because the ocean covers over 70% of the planet, and the presence of plastics is negatively impacting marine life and ecosystems.

Plastics are lightweight and cheap to ship, which has led to their widespread use by companies and brands. However, the episode emphasizes that the health implications of plastics are not favorable. Plastics can leach harmful chemicals into drinks and food when they are ingested, posing risks to human health. Additionally, the decomposition of plastics in landfills releases gases and chemicals into the atmosphere, contributing to environmental pollution.

The episode also highlights the issues with plastic recycling. While people are encouraged to recycle plastics, it is revealed that plastic water bottles, for example, can only be recycled once or twice before they break down and cannot be effectively recycled anymore. This has led to a recycling problem, with a majority of plastic waste ending up in landfills, incinerators, or directly in the natural environment.

To address the plastic pollution crisis, the Canadian federal government has taken steps to regulate plastics and decrease plastic pollution. They have implemented a ban on certain single-use plastics and are working towards a circular economy for plastics. The government is also in the process of developing a federal plastics registry, which will require companies to track and report their plastic production. This registry aims to make companies accountable for their plastic waste and encourage proper disposal and recycling practices.

The episode emphasizes the importance of the federal plastics registry in tracking the lifecycle of plastics and understanding where they end up after use. By making this information publicly accessible, Canadians and businesses can be informed about the environmental consequences of different types of plastics and put pressure on companies to be more responsible for their plastic waste. The registry is seen as a crucial tool in improving regulations and reducing plastic pollution.

Overall, the episode highlights the urgent need to address plastic pollution and the importance of tracking and regulating plastic production and usage. The establishment of a federal plastics registry in Canada is a significant step towards achieving these goals. By gathering comprehensive data on plastic production and monitoring its lifecycle, the government can implement more effective policies and regulations to reduce plastic pollution and move towards a circular economy for plastics.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1551_CanadianPlasticsRegistry.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, we discuss the recent court ruling that has put Canada's plastic ban in jeopardy. Anthony, a plastics campaigner from Oceana Canada, joins us to shed light on the significance of the ruling. The court deemed the plastics being banned as non-toxic, which raised questions about the effectiveness of the ban. Anthony explains that the ruling challenges the listing of plastics as toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, which serves as the foundation for the ban. He emphasizes that the ban is still in effect as the government plans to appeal the ruling. However, during the appeal process, no new regulations are expected to be implemented. Anthony highlights the need for strong regulations and encourages individuals to get involved at the local level by advocating for bylaws that ban single-use plastics in their communities. He also mentions the upcoming Global Plastics Treaty negotiations as an opportunity to address plastic pollution on a global scale.

Oceana Canada Website: https://oceana.ca/en/our-campaigns/plastics/


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The episode delves into the concept that spending time in nature can foster a deeper appreciation for the environment and a stronger desire to protect it. Both the host and guest express their belief in this idea, highlighting that when people immerse themselves in nature and form a connection with it, they are more inclined to safeguard it. The guest provides examples of individuals who engage in activities like hunting, fishing, or hobbies that involve being in the environment, and how they become advocates for preserving oceans and lands. The host concurs with this perspective, emphasizing that the more time people spend in nature, the more they develop a love for it and a commitment to its protection. They also underscore the significance of organizations like Oceana in nurturing this appreciation for nature and the environment.

The podcast episode also addresses the disconnect between the scientific community and policy-making when it comes to addressing environmental issues. The speaker expresses frustration with the scientific community's focus on monitoring and reporting environmental degradation without taking practical steps to effect change. They believe that there is a lack of communication and collaboration between the scientific world in academia and the policy world that shapes environmental decisions.

To bridge this gap, the speaker shares their personal experience of transitioning from academia to working on data and policy at WWF Canada. They specifically mention their work on freshwater health assessments and their efforts to protect the Great Lakes from flawed environmental policies. One example they highlight is the absence of regulation on road salt, which they argue has devastating effects on freshwater ecosystems.

The speaker also discusses their current role at Oceania Canada, where they work on the plastics campaign. They emphasize the importance of making science-based decisions and applying valuable research findings to policy-making. They mention their ability to engage with academics and read academic papers, which allows them to integrate the worlds of science and policy.

Overall, the episode suggests the need for improved communication and collaboration between the scientific community and policymakers to effectively address environmental issues. The speaker's personal experiences underscore the importance of incorporating science into practical policy-making and making evidence-based decisions.

In the episode, the speakers emphasize the significance of habituating people to new processes and ways of interacting with their surroundings in order to bring about sustainable changes. They stress that implementing drastic changes all at once can be met with resistance and pushback. Instead, they propose a gradual approach, starting with smaller, more manageable changes.

One example mentioned in the episode is the plastic movement, which originated from the issue of plastic straws and their impact on sea turtles. The speakers argue that beginning with small changes like these helps people adjust to new ways of doing things. They also note that these smaller changes are often the ones most widely discussed and covered in the media.

The speakers also discuss the idea of effecting change on a larger scale by starting at the local level. They encourage individuals to engage in local politics and advocate for bylaws that ban single-use plastics at sports venues, for instance. They believe that by initiating change at a local level, individuals can have a broader impact and inspire others to follow suit.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of habituating people to new processes and ways of interacting with their surroundings to bring about sustainable changes. It emphasizes that change is a gradual process and that starting with smaller, manageable changes can be more effective in the long run. Additionally, the speakers encourage individuals to get involved in local politics and push for larger-scale changes to combat plastic pollution.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1537_OceanaCanadaPlasticsAnthonyMerante.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the Canadian government's ban on single-use plastics. He explains that the ban includes items such as straws, grocery bags, and takeout containers. However, he highlights a recent court ruling that may jeopardize the ban. The ruling states that these items should not be classified as toxic, potentially undermining the ban's effectiveness. Lewin delves into the importance of this classification and how it could impact the future of the plastic ban.

Tune in to learn more about the government's efforts to protect the ocean and how listeners can take action.

Link to article: https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/federal-court-quashes-cabinet-order-underlying-single-use-plastics-ban-1.6648375

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In this episode, the discussion revolves around the harmful effects of plastic pollution on both the environment and human health. The host emphasizes the pervasive presence of plastic in our daily lives, including in our food, salt, and air. Of particular concern are microplastics, tiny particles of plastic that can be found in various types of food. The urgent need to halt the production and distribution of plastic is underscored as a crucial step in addressing this issue.

Plastic pollution is described as a universal problem that affects everyone, regardless of gender, race, culture, religion, or age. While the immediate effects may not be apparent, the long-term consequences can be detrimental to our well-being. The episode stresses the importance of taking action to combat plastic pollution and highlights Canada's efforts in implementing a ban on single-use plastic items such as straws, grocery bags, and takeout containers.

However, this ban in Canada faces potential challenges due to a recent court ruling that dismissed the classification of plastic as toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. This setback is seen as a significant obstacle in the fight against plastic pollution. The episode raises questions about how the government will respond to these challenges and emphasizes the ongoing need for collective efforts to address plastic pollution and safeguard both the environment and human health.

The episode also mentions that the Canadian government is aware of the plastic pollution crisis and is actively considering taking action. The host states that the government is carefully reviewing a federal court judgment and strongly considering an appeal. Additionally, they highlight the government's commitment to collaborating with provinces, territories, civil society, and industry to tackle plastic waste and pollution. The host emphasizes the urgency for the government to overcome the challenges posed by plastic pollution and take decisive action. It is evident that the Canadian government is cognizant of the issue and actively working towards finding solutions to address the plastic pollution crisis.

Oceana Canada is mentioned as an organization calling on industry leaders and governments across the country to join forces in ending plastic pollution at its source. The podcast transcript highlights Oceana Canada's plea for action and support from industry leaders and governments in their fight against plastic pollution. The host encourages listeners to visit Oceana Canada's page to learn more about their plastic campaign. Furthermore, the host expresses their intention to invite a representative from Oceana Canada to discuss the setback in detail on the podcast. The overall message conveyed is that Oceana Canada is actively engaged in efforts to end plastic pollution and seeks support from industry leaders and governments to achieve this crucial goal.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1534_CanadasSignleUsePlasticBanAtRisk.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew is joined by Margaret Spring to discuss the pressing issue of plastic pollution. Margaret shares updates on a UN treaty and highlights the research and programs conducted at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. The conversation explores the actions needed from countries, companies, and individuals to reduce plastic use.

Tune in to learn more about the impact of plastic pollution and how we can all contribute to protecting the ocean.

Detailed Description

Margaret Spring joins Andrew on the podcast to discuss Ocean Plastic Pollution. She has a background in science, initially pursuing a degree in marine science. However, she realized that she could make a greater impact on the environment and the ocean by pursuing a career in law. Margaret believed that becoming a lawyer would allow her to effectively translate scientific knowledge and communicate it to others. She also mentioned the need to translate scientific findings for their expert colleagues. Despite acknowledging the challenges and intense training required to become a lawyer, Margaret remained committed to using her love for science and expertise in law to advocate for ocean justice and the protection of the ocean. She also highlighted their experience working in organizations like the Southern Environmental Law Center and the Center for International Environmental Law, which provided them with a better understanding of policy and politics.

During the episode, Margaret emphasized the importance of incorporating a business focus into the intersection of science and policy. She highlighted the efforts of her organization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, in this regard, noting that they have been integrating business practices into their operations even before the guest's arrival. Margaret stressed the need to realistically assess the environmental impact of their operations, particularly on the ocean, and effectively communicate this information to visitors and audiences.

Margaret also mentioned that their organization's credibility is enhanced by her commitment to modeling change and conservation. As a nonprofit organization, they rely on donations and contributions, but they also strive to conserve resources and manage expenses. They acknowledged the need to continuously improve their work and demonstrate tangible change. Additionally, Margaret acknowledged the fortunate position of their organization in California, a state with progressive policies in certain areas.

Furthermore, Margaret recognized that the business aspect of conservation is often overlooked in discussions about marine biology and marine conservation. She believed that in the future, the business perspective will play a significant role in leading conservation initiatives, particularly in addressing issues like plastic pollution. By integrating a business focus into the intersection of science, policy, and conservation, she believed that they can have a greater impact and drive major policy changes that benefit everyone.

Monterey Bay Aquarium Plastic Pollution Resources: https://www.montereybayaquarium.org/act-for-the-ocean/plastic-pollution/what-we-do

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1507_MargaretSpringOceanPlastics.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin is joined by Thomas Sagimo and Tilda Bouloux from Ocean Sole. They discuss the company's efforts in creating sustainable products that benefit both the environment and the people involved in production. Ocean Sole specializes in transforming flip flops into functional art pieces. The episode explores the importance of companies who would like to clean up the environment while supporting local communities and encourages listeners to support Ocean Sole's mission.

Audience members get 15% off their cart total using the code SPEAKUP.

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Website: https://oceansole.com/
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/OceanSole1
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/OceanSoleKenya

 

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Direct download: HTPTO_E1482_OceanSoleBeachCleanUpKenya.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Canada has implemented a ban on single-use plastic products as part of its goal to achieve zero plastic waste by 2030. However, environmentalists are concerned about the increasing use of paper packaging as a substitute. Nicole Rycroft, the founder of Canopy, a nonprofit organization working to protect forests, warns that the shift to paper is leading to deforestation and forest degradation. She estimates that over three billion trees, including old-growth and endangered trees, are logged annually to produce paper-based products. In addition to deforestation, the production of paper requires significant amounts of energy and water. While paper is more biodegradable and easier to recycle than plastic, the grade of paper affects its recyclability. Furthermore, when paper ends up in landfills, it decomposes and releases methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The paper industry is exploring alternative solutions such as using agricultural waste like straw, hemp, flax, tomato stems, and banana peels to make sustainable single-use products. Biodegradable resins are also being used but are often expensive and have limited applications. Waste policies should transition away from a single-use model, and consumers are encouraged to choose reusable packaging whenever possible to achieve more sustainable outcomes.
 
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1453_PlasticToPaperCanada.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Canada just passed a law to ban 6 types of single-use plastics across the nation over the next 3 years in an unprecedented move to curb plastic waste, but some people think that Canada can do more, including Oceana. I am going to talk about how Oceana Canada thinks Canada can reduce plastic even more and I want to ask the question, is it too much?
 
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1342_CanCanadaDoBetterWithPlastic.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

We have a plastic pollution problem in this world and we can't solve it unless countries put in policies to ban single-use plastics, but what will a ban look like. In this episode, I am going to describe how Canada is going to ban single-use plastics as soon as December 2022.
 
Link to Press Release: https://bit.ly/3NmDFsi
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1324_CanadaIsBanningSingleUsePlastic.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In the last episode, I talked about a new enzyme that can breakdown plastics in days instead of centuries and it seems very promising, but we know that it is not the complete solution and people will continue to use single-use plastics; therefore, in this episode, I offer three ways that we need to get a mass reduction of plastic use.
 
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Direct download: SUFB_E1307_DoPeopleTrulyUnderstandThePlasticPollutionProblem.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

A new enzyme that can break down plastics in a matter of days and not centuries is giving people hope that we can still use plastics and not have to worry about the reduction, but the solution will only take care of a small percentage of plastic pollution. Therefore, we need to continue the pursuit of reducing our single-use plastics.
 
In this episode, I will discuss why we need to stay the course in reducing our plastic dependence.
 
Sign up to find out about the audio Ocean Conservation Careers members group:
 
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Direct download: SUFB_S1306_EnzymeBreaksDownPlastics.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

We often wait too late until we change the bad things we do in society. Climate change is wreaking havoc on our planet and we are still debating on whether it's real. 

Now, a study showed that microplastics are in the human bloodstream so are we going to do something more radical about plastic pollution so this doesn't become a bigger problem than the crisis it already is?

Link to article: https://bit.ly/3iGHWK7

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The Ocean Clean Up Project recently released a video showing a trawl net releasing plastic pollution that it supposedly hauled from the ocean and released on the deck of a shipping vessel. However, there seemed to be some things that did not add up in the video. 

There was no bycatch from the fishing net used to clean up the plastic. The plastic was intact, which is very different than most of the plastic found at sea (microplastic), and the plastic was clean (almost looking brand new). No biofouling was present on the plastics, which is different than most other plastic items found at sea. 

Some scientists and conservationists are calling the video staged. 

What do you think?

Link to video: https://bit.ly/3JvQNJR

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Direct download: SUFB_S1271_IsTheOceanCleanUpReallyCleaningUpTheOcean.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Plastic pollution in the Ocean is a serious problem as 12 million tons of plastic pollution is added to the Ocean on a daily basis. 

An amendment to the UN's 1989 Basel Convention added the disposal of plastic to reduce the amount of plastic pollution. where all of the original signatories have signed on to the amendment including China and Canada in the last year. However, the US has yet to ratify the convention since its inception. The Biden-Harris administration might be different, but they have not had the time to even consider it and there is a strong industry lobby that is opposing the Basel Convention.

Link to Article: https://news.mongabay.com/2021/05/as-the-rest-of-world-tackles-plastics-disposal-the-u-s-resists/https://news.mongabay.com/2021/05/as-the-rest-of-world-tackles-plastics-disposal-the-u-s-resists/

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Have you noticed an increase in your usage of sign-use plastic when you order from the Grocery Store or due to orders from online purchases? 

There is a great article in the Los Angeles Times that shows there was an increase in single-use plastics, but a decrease in the garbage. 

Link To Article: https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2020-08-16/italy-garbage-dips-with-virus-lockdowns-but-plastics-rise

Plastic pollution in the Ocean is already a major problem so how do we get people to change their behaviours and be safe? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

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Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
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Madame Curiosity
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2xUlSax
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2V38QQ1

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz

Ocean Science Radio
Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/3chJMfA
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3bnkP18

The Guide To Mindful Conservation: Dancing In Pink Hiking Boots:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/31P4UY6
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3f7hDJw

 

Direct download: SUFB_S1049_CoronavirusResultsInAnIncreaseInSingleUsePlastic.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Indonesia has the second-largest amount of pollution entering the ocean and its citizens are tired of it. They want the government to implement better waster management systems. The movement for a better system is driven by the youth of Indonesia, which has worked with the government to recently ban plastic bags, styrofoam, and plastic straws in July 2019. More needs to be done though. 

Listen to the episode for more information.

Link to article: https://news.mongabay.com/2020/02/in-bali-young-people-lead-the-fight-as-a-plastic-plague-threatens-paradise/

Do you think the Indonesian Government is on the right track? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

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Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Projects For Wildlife Podcast:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Oc17gy
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/37rinWz

Direct download: SUFB_S968_SavingIndonesiaFromPlasticPollution.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

There are a number of countries that have either banned or plan to ban single-use plastics as their citizens are demanding that we stop adding plastic pollution to the Ocean. Consumers are also demanding that manufacturers create more options for less waste of their products such as refill stations; however, some manufacturers are not quite sure if their consumers are ready for refill stations based on attempts in the past. 

Listen to the episode for more details.

Link to the article discussed in the episode:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/refills-beauty-cleaning-1.5344042

Would you try using a refillable station for a product at a grocery store? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

Speak Up For Blue Instagram

Speak Up For Blue Twitter

Check out the Shows on the Speak Up For Blue Network:

Marine Conservation Happy Hour
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k4ZB3x
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2kkEElk

ConCiencia Azul:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k6XPio
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k4ZMMf

Dugongs & Seadragons:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lB9Blv
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lV6THt

Environmental Studies & Sciences
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2lx86oh
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2lG8LUh

Marine Mammal Science:
Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2k5pTCI
Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2k1YyRL

Direct download: SUFB_S919_AreConsumersReadyForProductRefillStations.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 3:42pm EDT

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was photographed while meeting with some teenagers in his home riding with a bag of plastic cutlery after announcing, just 2 weeks ago, a proposal to ban single-use plastic by 2021. Did he buy the plastic? Probably not; however, the optics are not great and opponents are on the attack. 

We all get caught up in a destructive and wasteful society because that is what we have created. Our society has opted for making money with lighter and cheaper materials rather than sturdy and more efficient materials. 

However, we shouldn't worry about getting caught up in this type of society. We should be more focused on how we ourselves should change the types of products that we use. 

I have some ideas that I mention in the podcast. Share your thoughts on this topic in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to be more eco-friendly? Buy certified eco-friendly products from our affiliate partner the Grove Collaborative: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

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Direct download: SUFB_S821_GettingCaughtInModernDestruction.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

There is a video that is making rounds on Canadian Social Media feeds that attacks the proposed bill on a Canadian-wide ban of single-use plastics by 2021. While the rest of the world is rejoicing at the thought of the ban, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's opponents say the bill should not matter because Canada does not produce most of the plastic pollution as compared to other nations.

It is estimated that 165 million tons of plastic pollution in the ocean.

Even 1%, which is what the video estimates as Canada's plastic pollution output is, of that would be over 1 million tons of plastic pollution. That's quite a bit of pollution. 

I refute many of the "facts" that the video provides. 

Take a listen and share your thoughts in the Facebook Group: http://www.spreakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

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Direct download: SUFB_S807_PoliticsAndPlastics.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 5:33pm EDT

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a federal ban on single-use plastic to be implemented in 2021. There will be a list of items that will be banned; however, the list hasn't been fully created yet. 

Trudeau also mentioned that the plan will include working with manufacturers to reduce the amount of plastic used in their packaging. 

There is some criticism from the opposition party, but you will have to take a listen to find out more.

What do you think about the ban? Share your thoughts in the Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

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Direct download: SUFB_S805_CanadaToBanSingleUsePlastic.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

I had the pleasure to speak to Dianna Cohen, CEO of the Plastic Pollution Coalition, a coalition of 750 organizations, businesses, and individuals. 

During our conversation, we discuss how Dianna got into fighting Plastic Pollution, how the coalition started, why REFUSE is the fourth (and first R), and how you could like a plastic-free lifestyle.  

Do you strive to live a Plastic-Free lifestyle? Share your tactics in our Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

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Did you know that countries ship their recycled waste to other countries for recycling and disposal? Well, apparently it's been happening for a while, but it seems like it's going to stop now.

Malaysia and the Philippines are sick and tired of Canada's Recycled and Contaminated waste so they are sending it back. 

As a Canadian, I am appalled that we were sending our Trash away. It will be interesting to see what happens to the trash we get back and what we produce in the future. As usual, I have some thoughts and share them in this episode.

What are your thoughts? Share them in the Speak Up For BLue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

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Direct download: SUFB_S794_CanadasRecyclingReturningFromOverseas.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

Researchers have found a massive amount of plastic on a remote island in the Indian Ocean. The plastic and debris were not made or used by a population of 600 people that live on the island. It came from other countries generated by other people. 

Unfortunately, the local community will be affected by this plastic pollution for decades to come as it will take a lifetime to get rid of all of the plastic. The presence of plastic pollution will affect tourism and could affect the local economy.

Check out more details in the episode. How are you going to change your plastic usage in the future? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.


It's amazing that we can find trash in the deepest parts of the Ocean. And when I say amazing, I mean that in the most depressing way!

Some people see the news of trash in the deepest parts of the Ocean and don't know what I do. Other people, like myself, see trash at the deepest parts of the Ocean and want to see action. 

I want to see myself and my community doing more to stop using wasteful products. I want to see us avoid buying products based on waste packaging. I want to see your efforts on social media. Tag me on Instagram, Tag me on Twitter, Post in the Facebook Group images of the type of eco-friendly products you use. Let's build a community of "Doers!"

Share your actions to Live For A Better Ocean in the Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Want to get started on living for a better Ocean? Sign up for the Grove Collaborative and get a free gift: http://www.speakupforblue.com/goocean.

Check out the new Speak Up For The Ocean Blue Podcast App: http://www.speakupforblue.com/app.

 

Direct download: SUFB_S783_ExplorerSetsDepthRecordAndFindsTrash.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 1:00pm EDT

I got the chance to sit down with John Davis to discuss how funding for projects for fighting marine plastic pollution is shifting from a non-profit model to a for-profit model. The shift comes with companies and venture capitalists that have identified a number of opportunities to make money off of harnessing ocean plastic pollution to make a profit and an impact. 

John and I dive into how the funding was distributed in the past and how many of the original organizations are being left out of the funding for a new model. 

Do these organizations that fight marine plastic pollution need to evolve with the times to survive and build on their legacy? Share your thoughts in the Speak Up For Blue Facebook Group: http://www.speakupforblue.com/group.

Links From This Episode:

OCTO (Open Communications For The Oceans)

Marine Debris Listserv


Dr. Edd Hind-Ozan joins me for another segment of "What's Happening in Marine Social Science This Week" where we discuss a plastic pollution story in Nigeria. The story describes a lawyer who was sick of seeing plastic on her beach so much that she started an organization involving community clean ups to help rid the beach of plastic. 

I cover a story out of the North Eastern Pacific, where a warm water mass has formed and being dubbed the "Son of the Blob." Some meteorologists are suggesting the that water mass may be responsible for the droughts and forest fires along the West Coast of North America.

Let us know your thoughts on this episode in the Facebook Group:

http://www.speakupforblue.com/group

Enjoy the Podcast!!!

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Direct download: SUFB_S634_PlasticPollutionInNigeriaAndSonOfTheBlob.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 4:00pm EDT

For years China has been accepting plastic from many parts of the world include the US; however, the superpower stopped accepting plastic in "dirty" form last January (2018). The questions now is what does the US do with all of its plastic waste? 

John Davis (OCTO) is here to try and answer the question as it has been the latest topic on the Marine-Debris Listserv. We discuss the new form the plastic must be in for China to accept it. We also discuss how cities are adapting to this new format and what they are doing with their plastic trash. 

We would love to hear your ideas. You can join the Marine-Debris Listserv by going to https://marinedebris.openchannels.org/.

Enjoy the Podcast!!!

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Direct download: SUFB_S626_ChinaWontTakePlasticWhatNowWithJohnDavis.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 4:00pm EDT

The International Shoreline Cleanup occurs in September every year. It's a way to get people to understand how much plastic and debris washes up on beaches. 

Greenpeace Canada has released a report identifying the common pieces of trash that was found along the shorelines in Canada. The CBC covered the report and why the corporations should be responsible for the items they create. Some corporations blame the recycling and waste management system.

How do you think the corporations should react to their items being found on Canadian Shorelines? Let us know in the Facebook Group.

Source

Enjoy The Podcast!!!

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My wife and I went to New York City with two other couples to celebrate our 40th birthdays together. I've reflected a lot over the past year on my 40th year on this planet, especially how I can make it better. With that in mind, I now notice many things about the environment when it comes to how we utilize containers, straws and other single-use plastics. I noticed a few things in New York City that I discuss in this episode. 

Enjoy the Podcast!!!

Do you live in New York City? Do you agree with me about what I said? Let me know in the Facebook Group.

Join our Patreon community to listen to our new shows Deep Dive and Dugongs and Sea dragons.

Direct download: SUFB_S551_NewYorkCityWaste.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 4:00pm EDT

Daisy Kendrick was troubled by the fact that her friends were not aware of Ocean issues, so she decided to create marketing campaigns that target where other organizations aren't...the gaming community.

Today, you are going to here from someone who is quickly becoming a successful non-profit entrepreneur that is working to change the behaviour of how we use plastic.

Enjoy the podcast!

Support Science and Climate Change Science Research by buying our Graphic T-shirts "Science Can't Be Silenced" and "Climate Change is here, it's real, it's time to act." The March for Science is over, but Climate Change Research must continue so we are extending our campaign to support Climate Change Science Research as a Speak Up For Blue Community. $5 of every shirt purchased will be donated to support the research of Dr. Michelle LaRue, who researches how Climate Change affects various animals in the Antarctic and Arctic systems. http://www.speakupforblue.com/shop

Are you looking to change the way you eat for a better health and environment? Start using Arbonne nutrition and health care products that are all natural and environmentally friendly. I use them all the time and their nutrition line has transformed the way I eat and my health.

Email me today, andrew@speakupforblue.com to find out how you can transform your health.

Looking to transform your health and wellness using Arbonne products? Learn about our starter package to get you living for a better Ocean by contacting me at andrew@speakupforblue.com.

 


Plastic pollution in the Ocean is a worldwide epidemic affecting water quality and the health of Ocean species more than we already know. Over 100,000 marine mammals (whales, dolphins), sea turtles, seabirds and fish are killed each year by marine debris including plastic pollution. Plastic pollution is an Ocean issue that is not debated as other issues are (climate change) as it has been documented by many organizations and advocates who travel out to the Ocean Gyres (5 of them) to witness, take photographs and video the evidence of plastic pollution and the ocean; however, plastic pollution is a HUGE issue in the Oceans.

Plastics and other marine debris can be found on beaches and coastlines all over the world. They wash up from the ocean after floating around for years and they wash down the watershed from land-based sources eventually landing in the Ocean. In fact, nearly 45% of land-based trash comes from 5 countries in Asia; although, this doesn’t mean that other countries such as the Canada and the US aren’t adding to the plastic pollution problem. If this is such a big problem, then why do more people not know about it? There are many organizations out there such as Plastic Pollution Coalition, 5 Gyres, Environmental Defence Fund, Tangaroa Blue and the Ocean Conservancy that are raising awareness through research and awareness campaigns; however, it still seems that many people do not know of the problem with plastic pollution.

A couple of weeks ago, a friend of mine here in Burlington, Ontario (Canada) tagged me in a Facebook post with a video about the plastic pollution and debris that travels through the storm sewers and into Lake Ontario. It was one storm sewer, but probably a common occurrence with many other sewer outfalls as well. He asked me who people could call and I mentioned that this wasn’t completely a government clean up problem (in Burlington, we have a sophisticated waste management system: compost, recycling and garbage with deleterious substances being thrown out at specific facilities). It’s not a perfect system, but it’s quite good in comparison to other cities around the world. I told my friend that the problem lies mostly with people and the way that we use and dispose of single use products. Plastic bags, plastic utensils, plastic containers, plastic water bottles are all part of the problem. These items are either dropped on the ground (people) or they are end up in the water from landfills (government).

It’s a problem that needs to be discussed within every community in every city. Government campaigns to make more people aware of the items that end up in their lake (or water body) and how they can reduce the use of those items coupled with regularly scheduled beach clean ups will help reduce the amount of plastic pollution in the lake and bring the community closer together.

I did an interview with Heidi Taylor of Tangaroa Blue, an organization that not only cleans up beaches, but works with industry to find alternative sustainable solutions to common items found in their beach clean ups along the east coast of Australia. Heidi and her organization recruits a team of citizen scientists to work with her team to clean up and enumerate the items found on a beach and use the database to make informed decisions and change policies.

There are some great organizations out there raising awareness, cleaning up beaches and working with government and industry partners to help reduce plastic pollution and other marine debris; however, more awareness is necessary. It’s a good thing the Speak Up For Blue team is all about raising awareness and has a growing podcast out to help spread the world. We found the perfect person to interview to help us in our mission.

Ocean Conservancy’s Nick Mallos, Director of their Trash Free Seas Alliance program, sat down with me at the International Marine Conservation Congress to answer a few questions about marine debris and how we can reduce/eliminate it.

Take a listen to the podcast and let us know what you think in the show notes.

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10 Ocean Tips to Conserve the Ocean: http://www.speakupforblue.com/wordpress/sufb_optinpdf

Direct download: SUFB_S192_TrashFreeSeasWithNickMallos.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 8:07pm EDT

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