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December 2023
S M T W T F S
     
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31

Syndication

Andrew Lewin discusses a company called Fallow that supports various conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. By purchasing a bracelet, individuals can support the tracking and conservation efforts of animals such as sharks, polar bears, penguins, sea turtles, and more. Andrew shares his personal experience of receiving a shark bracelet as a gift and highlights the importance of tracking studies in understanding and protecting marine species. He also explores the potential of this sales model in supporting conservation efforts and invites listeners to share their thoughts on the topic. 

To learn more about Fahlo and their bracelets, visit myfahlo.com.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

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The company Fallow is dedicated to supporting conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. When customers purchase a bracelet, a portion of the proceeds is donated to these organizations. Fallow has established partnerships with renowned organizations like the Sea Turtle Conservancy, Polar Bears International, Saving the Blue, Global Penguin Society, and the Marine Conservation Lab at Florida International University, among others. Each bracelet is uniquely designed to represent a specific animal, allowing customers to choose which animal they would like to support. These bracelets not only serve as a means of contribution but also as a symbol of support.

Fallow's bracelets offer buyers the opportunity to actively support the conservation efforts of real animals. Each bracelet is associated with a particular animal, such as a shark, polar bear, penguin, sea turtle, lion, giraffe, elephant, or gorilla. By purchasing the corresponding bracelet, buyers can directly contribute to the conservation of their chosen animal. These bracelets not only symbolize support but also provide information on the animal's journey and ongoing conservation efforts.

Supporting conservation organizations through purchases like these allows individuals to make a meaningful contribution, even if they are unable to donate large sums of money. In a podcast episode, Fallow is highlighted as a company that supports various conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. Each bracelet represents a different animal, and the proceeds from sales are dedicated to the conservation work and tracking of these animals. By purchasing a bracelet for $25, individuals can actively contribute to the conservation of species such as sharks, polar bears, penguins, and sea turtles.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1548_TrackYourSharkSeaTurtlePolarBearPenguin.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of science communication and highlights a video by the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab. The video provides insight into the lab's research on great white sharks, their habitat, and their behavior.

Andrew emphasizes the need for more positive content about sharks and encourages other research labs to share their work through videos and other forms of media. He praises the Shark Lab's call to action and suggests that more videos like this can help dispel fears and increase understanding and appreciation for sharks.

Andrew also mentions the challenges of science communication and the importance of media training for researchers. He concludes by expressing his hope for the future of science communication and his plans to produce documentary videos.

Watch the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ztvzjhdAEQ&t=682s

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

The California State University Long Beach Shark Lab has released a video titled "Shivers in the Shadows: The Shark Lab's Call to Action" to educate the public about their research on great white sharks. The video aims to dispel common misconceptions and fears about these apex predators while highlighting the importance of understanding and conserving them. Featuring interviews with lab members, including Dr. Chris Lowe, the video discusses their research methods, such as tagging and drone footage, to study the movements and behaviors of great whites, particularly juvenile sharks in Southern California. It emphasizes that interactions between great whites and humans are rare and accidental, with the sharks primarily preying on sea lions and fish. The video also showcases the lab's efforts in training students in media skills to effectively communicate their research to the public. The host of the podcast expresses support for the video and encourages other labs to produce similar content to promote understanding and appreciation for sharks.

The video produced by the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab aims to educate the public about the behavior and importance of great white sharks, reducing fear and promoting the conservation of these apex predators. It provides insights into the lab's research, including tracking the movements of juvenile great whites and studying their interactions with other marine species. Emphasizing that great whites pose minimal threat to humans and primarily focus on hunting sea lions and fish, the video dispels myths and provides accurate information to change public perceptions and foster a greater appreciation for these sharks. The lab's call to action is for viewers to understand and protect the important juvenile habitat in Southern California and support ongoing research efforts. Overall, the video serves as a powerful tool for science communication, highlighting the need for more positive and informative content about sharks.

Titled "Shivers in the Shadows: The Shark Lab's Call to Action," the video highlights the work of the Shark Lab at California State University Long Beach (CSULB). Serving as a documentary, it educates viewers about the lab's research and introduces the researchers involved in the project.

The video provides an overview of the lab's research on great white sharks, particularly in Southern California, emphasizing the importance of understanding these apex predators and dispelling misconceptions about their behavior. The researchers at the Shark Lab conduct various studies, including tagging sharks, monitoring their movements, and using drone footage to track their behavior.

Featuring Dr. Chris Lowe, the head of the Shark Lab, and other members of the lab, the video introduces viewers to the individuals involved in the research and allows them to share their perspectives and insights. The researchers discuss their motivations for studying sharks and the importance of communicating their findings to the public.

The video also highlights the lab's efforts in science communication and media training, emphasizing the importance of effectively communicating scientific research to the public and addressing common fears and misconceptions about sharks. By showcasing the researchers' expertise and passion, the video aims to encourage viewers to engage with the lab and learn more about sharks and marine conservation.

Overall, the video serves as a call to action for viewers to support the work of the Shark Lab and promote a better understanding and appreciation for great white sharks. It demonstrates the power of science communication and the importance of sharing research findings to dispel fears and promote conservation efforts.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1547_SharkLabYTVideo.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses how the UK government is setting catch limits for fish populations above what scientific advice recommends. He explains the importance of following scientific advice to ensure sustainable fishing practices and prevent overfishing. Andrew also highlights the negative consequences of ignoring scientific advice, using the example of the collapse of the cod fishery in Canada. He emphasizes the need for governments to prioritize conservation and make decisions based on the best available science.

Link to article: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/dec/21/conservationists-take-uk-to-court-for-illegally-squandering-fish-stocks

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
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Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

In this episode of the podcast, the host discusses the importance of governments listening to scientific advice and setting conservative catch limits to ensure the long-term sustainability of fish stocks. The host highlights the example of the Canadian government's mismanagement of cod stocks, which led to the collapse of the fishery and devastating consequences for the fishing community. Despite the advice of fishery scientists, the government continued to set catch limits above the recommended levels, resulting in a depletion of the population. The host emphasizes that following scientific advice and setting conservative catch limits is crucial to prevent overfishing and maintain healthy fish populations. The recent case of the UK government setting catch limits above scientific advice is also mentioned, with conservationists challenging the government's actions in court. The host argues that ignoring scientific advice and setting higher catch limits undermines conservation efforts and puts fish stocks at risk. It is suggested that governments should work with the fishing community to find a balance between sustainable fishing practices and livelihoods, while prioritizing the long-term health of fish populations. Overall, the episode emphasizes the need for governments to prioritize scientific advice and take proactive measures to protect and sustain fish stocks.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1546_ConservationistsSueUKGovForOverfishing1.mp3
Category:Fisheries -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Canadian fish stocks are in trouble. Andrew Lewin and Oceana's Rebecca Schijns discuss the importance of fisheries audits and the state of Canada's fisheries. Joined by fishery scientist Rebecca Schijns from Oceana Canada, they delve into the results of the audits and the need for conservation efforts. Rebecca shares the results of Oceana's 7th Annual Fishery Audit for Canadian fish stocks.

Tune in to learn more about the challenges and solutions for safeguarding Canada's fisheries.

Oceana Canada's Fishery Audit: https://oceana.ca/en/reports/fishery-audit-2023/

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

 

The organization highlighted in the episode emphasizes the significance of collaborating with communities and valuing input from community leaders. They believe that engaging with community leadership and sharing their findings is crucial, as it allows them to address any questions or concerns and ensure that their recommendations for rebuilding abundance in the oceans accurately reflect a wide range of people's priorities.

Recognizing the importance of diverse perspectives, the organization acknowledges that different communities may have unique priorities and viewpoints on how to rebuild abundance. Therefore, they actively seek input from community leaders to ensure that their recommendations are comprehensive and representative.

In addition to engaging with community leaders, the organization also organizes symposiums and workshops to gather feedback and interact with various stakeholders. They specifically mention their interactions with Indigenous leaders and their efforts to prioritize Indigenous knowledge systems in ecosystem resilience and abundance. This demonstrates their commitment to including Indigenous perspectives and incorporating reconciliation commitments into fisheries management.

Overall, the organization values community input and recognizes the importance of considering a wide range of perspectives when making recommendations for rebuilding abundance in the oceans. They believe that by incorporating diverse priorities and knowledge systems, they can work towards a better future for fisheries and act with urgency against climate change.

The organization mentioned in the episode circulates its audit and recommendations to the minister's office, emphasizing the importance of communicating with community leadership and sharing their results. However, they have not yet had the opportunity to meet directly with the newest minister, as they took office at the end of the summer. Nevertheless, they ensure that the audit and recommendations, including the letters of recommendation, are shared with the minister's office.

The organization discussed in the episode focuses on improving science monitoring and management in the fisheries sector. While acknowledging substantial investments in fisheries science and management programs, they highlight a lack of focus and dedicated capacity to implement real change on the water. They emphasize the importance of incorporating sound science into decision-making processes, extending beyond year-to-year decisions.

Recognizing the turnover in leadership within the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, with six different ministers over six years, the organization emphasizes the need for the new fisheries minister to fulfill their mandate on fishery sustainability and make critical decisions regarding key stocks like cod, capelin, mackerel, and herring. They also advocate for the inclusion of more fish under the Amended Fisheries Act and rebuilding regulations to provide optimal protection for fisheries in Canada.

The organization has engaged with the government through briefings and interactions, sharing their results and recommendations to improve science monitoring and management. They have received positive feedback and have been informed about ongoing efforts behind the scenes, such as the progress of rebuilding plans awaiting final approval. However, they also stress the importance of holding the government accountable for accomplishing the necessary tasks.

The organization's fishery audit coincided with the Office of the Auditor General's audit on monitoring. Both audits revealed pervasive issues in fisheries monitoring, including compliance and enforcement of fisheries catches. While there have been improvements with the fisheries monitoring policy introduced in 2019, implementation has been delayed, resulting in a significant gap in understanding what is being caught and making well-informed decisions on quotas.

One of the challenges highlighted by the organization is effectively communicating scientific concepts, such as the definition of a stock, to non-scientific audiences. They emphasize the importance of utilizing reliable information and evidence to comprehend the state of fisheries and design management measures that support healthy fisheries. They stress the need for a long-term vision and commitment from the government to bring about lasting change for the betterment of the oceans and coastal communities.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1545_OceanaCanadaFisheryAudit.mp3
Category:Fisheries -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses how anyone can become the next Jacques Cousteau, Dr. Sylvia Earle, or Sir David Attenborough through the power of social media. He emphasizes the importance of publishing content on platforms like TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube to inspire and educate others about marine conservation. Andrew shares his own experience with podcasting and highlights the success of other individuals who have used social media to become influencers in the field. He also encourages listeners to find their authentic voice and develop a workflow that allows them to consistently publish content. The episode concludes with a reminder that everyone has the potential to make a difference in ocean conservation and that taking action is key.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Facebook Group: https://bit.ly/3NmYvsI

Connect with Speak Up For Blue:
Website: https://bit.ly/3fOF3Wf
Instagram: https://bit.ly/3rIaJSG
Twitter: https://bit.ly/3rHZxpc 

In this episode, the host emphasizes the power of social media in inspiring others and becoming influential voices for ocean conservation. They mention iconic figures like Sir David Attenborough, Jacques Cousteau, and Dr. Sylvia Earle, who have inspired many through their work in marine conservation. The host encourages listeners to recognize their potential to make a significant impact by utilizing today's technology and social media platforms.

The importance of publishing content on social media as a means of sharing one's passion for the ocean and raising awareness about conservation issues is highlighted. The host emphasizes that publishing doesn't have to be limited to academic papers, but can include personal experiences, stories, and insights related to marine biology and conservation. They mention platforms like TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube as opportunities for individuals to connect with audiences and showcase their creativity and knowledge about the ocean.

The concept of becoming an influencer in the digital age is also discussed. The host mentions the past "gatekeeping" where only a select few had access to platforms like television to reach a wide audience. However, with social media, there is now greater accessibility and the potential for anyone to become an influencer. Examples of individuals who have gained popularity and recognition through their social media presence, particularly on TikTok and Instagram, are provided.

The episode acknowledges that starting and maintaining a social media presence requires effort and consistency. The host encourages listeners to find their authentic voice and style of communication that resonates with their audience. They also emphasize the importance of developing a workflow and finding efficient ways to create and publish content.

Overall, the episode emphasizes that individuals to become influential voices for ocean conservation through social media. It encourages listeners to embrace the opportunities provided by technology and social media platforms to share their passion, inspire others, and make a positive impact on marine conservation.

In the podcast episode, the host emphasizes the importance of finding an authentic voice and style when communicating about the ocean. They explain that in today's digital age, there are numerous platforms available for sharing information and inspiring others, such as social media, podcasts, and videos. However, it is crucial to be true to oneself and communicate in a genuine and authentic manner.

The host mentions the many influencers and content creators on social media who have gained popularity by sharing their passion for the ocean. They highlight the example of a marine biologist who uses platforms like TikTok and Instagram to showcase her research on stingrays and engage with her audience. By being true to her own style and presenting her work in an engaging manner, she has become an inspiration to many.

The host also acknowledges the temptation to imitate others who have found success in their communication efforts. They mention a social media guru who has built a multi-million dollar company and has a large following. However, it is important to find one's own unique voice and not simply copy others. Authenticity is key in connecting with an audience and making a lasting impact.

Furthermore, the host acknowledges that finding an authentic voice and style may take time and experimentation. They reflect on their own journey with the podcast and how they had to adapt and change their approach over time. They encourage listeners to embrace the process and not be discouraged by the initial challenges. With persistence and a genuine passion for the subject matter, anyone can find their own voice and make a meaningful impact in ocean conservation.

In conclusion, the podcast episode emphasizes the importance of finding an authentic voice and style when communicating about the ocean. It encourages individuals to embrace the digital platforms available and share their passion in a way that feels genuine and true to themselves. By doing so, they can inspire others and make a positive impact in the field of ocean conservation.

In this episode, the host emphasizes the importance of developing a workflow and learning how to effectively publish content on social media to reach and engage with an audience. The host starts by discussing the power of social media and how it has eliminated the gatekeeping that used to exist in the world of influencers and content creators. With social media, anyone can become an influencer and share their passion and expertise with the world.

The host uses examples of successful marine biologists and conservationists who have used social media to become their own versions of famous figures like Sir David Attenborough and Jacques Cousteau. They highlight the case of a PhD student named Jalyn Myers, who films her work on stingrays and shares it on platforms like TikTok and Instagram. By doing so, she has gained a significant following and become an inspiration to others interested in marine biology.

The host also acknowledges that developing a successful social media presence takes time and effort. They mention their own experience of starting a podcast and the challenges they faced in the beginning. However, they emphasize that with consistency and a clear purpose, it is possible to build an audience and make a positive impact.

To help listeners get started, the host announces their plan to dedicate future episodes to discussing workflow and providing tips on how to effectively publish content on social media. They encourage listeners to find their own authentic voice and style, and to focus on what they can bring to the table rather than trying to copy others.

In conclusion, the episode highlights the importance of developing a workflow and learning how to effectively publish content on social media platforms. By doing so, individuals can reach and engage with their audience, inspire others, and make a meaningful impact in the field of marine biology and conservation.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1544_YouAreTheNewDavidAttenborough.mp3
Category:Science Communication -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

On today's episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, we delve into the concerns surrounding the surfing event at the Paris 2024 Olympics. While the Olympics are set to take place in Paris, the surfing competition will be held in Tahiti's Teahupo’o Bay, a renowned location for its waves and subsistence fishing. However, there is a contentious issue regarding the construction of an aluminum tower for the event. Local Tahitians are worried about the potential damage to coral reefs and fish populations. A protest has been organized, and we will discuss the details in this episode. Stay tuned!

Link to article: https://news.mongabay.com/2023/12/reef-damage-from-2024-olympics-surfing-venue-is-avoidable-commentary/

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The surfing event for the Paris 2024 Olympics is set to take place in Tahiti at Teahupo’o Bay, a renowned location known for its legendary waves, making it an ideal spot for surfers. Teahupo’o Bay is also recognized for its subsistence fishing, where local fishermen catch fish for their own consumption and sometimes sell them at local markets.

The selection of Teahupo’o Bay for the surfing event highlights the area's natural beauty and significance. The bay's coral reef plays a crucial role in creating the waves that attract surfers, while also providing a habitat for various fish species. The local fishing communities depend on these fish for sustenance and their livelihoods.

However, concerns have been raised about the potential negative impacts of the Olympics on Teahupo’o Bay. The construction of an aluminum tower for the event has raised worries among locals about the damage it may cause to the corals and fish populations. The tower will be placed within the shallow coral reef, requiring the installation of concrete bases and potentially displacing parts of the reef.

The protest against the tower's construction is driven by the desire to protect the environment and ensure the long-term sustainability of Teahupo’o Bay. Local surfers, fishermen, and community members have taken to social media platforms like Instagram and TikTok to raise awareness about the issue. They have also launched an online petition, which has garnered over 195,000 signatures.

Acknowledging the concerns raised by the local community, the Olympic Committee has made some changes to the construction plans. The proposed tower will now be smaller and lighter, reducing its potential impact on the reef. Additionally, the existing wooden tower, which has been deemed safe, will be utilized instead of building a new structure.

Despite these modifications, doubts still remain about the potential damage caused by the construction process. Videos have surfaced showing a barge getting stuck on the coral reef during an inspection, raising questions about the effectiveness of the proposed measures to minimize harm.

The controversy surrounding the surfing event in Teahupo’o Bay highlights the tensions between hosting large-scale events like the Olympics and preserving the natural environment. The concerns of the local community regarding the long-term impacts on the reef and fish populations are valid, and their efforts to raise awareness and push for changes should be supported. It remains to be seen how the Olympic Committee will address these concerns and ensure the sustainability of the event.

The locals in Tahiti are deeply concerned about the construction of an aluminum tower for the surfing event during the Paris 2024 Olympics. They fear that the construction and placement of the tower within the shallow coral reef of Teahupo’o Bay will cause damage to the corals and fish populations in the area. The tower will require concrete bases to be installed, displacing some of the reef and potentially disrupting the natural ecosystem. The locals rely on the coral reef for subsistence fishing, and any harm to the reef could have severe consequences for their livelihoods and food security.

The protesters argue that the construction of the tower goes against the sustainability goals of the Olympic Committee. While the committee has made efforts to make the Olympics more sustainable by reusing buildings and using a cruise liner as the Olympic village, the construction of the tower in Teahupo’o Bay contradicts these efforts. The locals believe that the existing wooden tower, which has been deemed safe, should be used instead. They argue that the construction of a new tower is unnecessary and poses a risk to the delicate coral reef ecosystem.

The protesters have taken various actions to raise awareness and oppose the construction of the tower. They have created videos on Instagram and TikTok, launched an online petition, and organized a protest. These efforts have garnered significant support, with over 195,000 signatures on the petition. The local fishing community, surfers, and the general population of Teahupo’o are all united in their opposition to the tower.

In response to the protests, the Olympic Committee has made some concessions. They have proposed reducing the size and weight of the tower to minimize its impact on the reef. They have also pledged to use electrically propelled barges with a shallow draft during construction to prevent damage to the coral. However, the protesters remain skeptical, citing evidence of damage caused by a barge during an inspection of the proposed tower site.

The controversy surrounding the construction of the tower highlights the tensions between hosting large-scale events like the Olympics and protecting local ecosystems. The locals in Teahupo’o Bay are concerned about the long-term consequences of the construction on their environment and way of life. They are calling for more sustainable alternatives and greater consideration of the local ecosystem in the planning and execution of the Olympics.

The episode discusses a protest that has emerged against the construction plans for the surfing event at the Paris 2024 Olympics in Tahiti. The local Tahitian community, including fishermen, farmers, and surfers, are concerned about the potential damage to the coral reefs and fish populations in the area. They have created an online petition that has received over 195,000 signatures and have used social media platforms like Instagram and TikTok to raise awareness about the issue.

In response to the protest and concerns, the Olympic Committee has made some changes to the construction plans. They have decided to reduce the size and weight of the aluminum tower that was initially proposed, making it similar to the existing wooden tower that has been deemed safe. The construction will involve concrete bases and drilling rods into the reef, but the committee claims that the smaller size of the tower will require less disruption to the corals. They have also scrapped plans for drinking water and wastewater connections to the mainland and will remove internet and submarine electric cables after the event. The majority of the tower will be temporary, but a three-meter pole above sea level will remain.

However, there is skepticism and mistrust from the local community regarding these changes. They have shared videos on social media that show a barge inspecting the proposed tower site getting stuck on the coral reef and causing damage. This contradicts the committee's claims of minimal damage during construction. The community is calling for the use of the existing wooden tower, which they believe is safe and would not require additional damage to the reef.

The episode emphasizes the importance of continued activism and support for the local community to protect the coral reefs and fish populations in Tahiti. It encourages listeners to sign the petition, engage with social media accounts, and consider boycotting the Olympics if the construction plans proceed without further changes.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1543_Paris2024ThreatensTahitiCoralReef.mp3
Category:Conservation Story -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the recent COP28 and its outcomes. The major headline from the convention was the agreement to phase out fossil fuels, but there is little else to report. Andrew goes on to share five key takeaways from the Climate Change Summit, highlighting potential historic moments while emphasizing the need for continued work. The episode is sponsored by Conservation Careers, a platform that offers resources for those interested in conservation careers. Andrew also mentions taking a communications for conservation course through Conservation Careers and expresses his enthusiasm for it.

Tune in to learn more about the outcomes of COP28 and how you can take action to protect the ocean.

Link to article: https://www.independent.co.uk/climate-change/news/cop28-summit-summary-deal-key-points-b2462598.html

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In this episode, the host emphasizes the significance of incremental progress in conservation efforts, even if they may not be as fast or aggressive as desired. The host acknowledges that while these small steps may not immediately lead to the desired significant changes, they are crucial for progress to occur. It is emphasized that these small building blocks need to be a global effort, with the world approaching conservation together.

The host draws a parallel between these small building blocks and the process of establishing a marine protected area. It is acknowledged that the initial boundaries may not be perfect and the management structure may not be the strongest, but it is essential to define the boundaries and start implementing management measures. Over time, improvements can be made, such as expanding the no-take reserve area, as exemplified by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of incremental progress in conservation and recognizes that although it may not be as fast or aggressive as desired, it is still necessary and contributes to the overall goal of environmental protection.

The episode also delves into the significance of the COP meetings in addressing climate change and fostering global collaboration. While the host may not be a huge fan of COP, it is acknowledged that these talks are necessary. It is emphasized that even though the progress made at these meetings may not be as fast or aggressive as desired, they serve as essential building blocks for addressing climate change on a global scale.

The host mentions that the COP28 meeting in the United Arab Emirates had both positive and negative aspects. While some attendees felt exhausted and frustrated by the talk and "BS" that occurs, the episode highlights the positive outcomes that can arise from these meetings. For instance, major hotels converting to more sustainable practices demonstrate that progress can be achieved through collaboration and the exchange of ideas with investors, companies, and stakeholders.

Overall, the episode suggests that despite the flaws and negativity associated with COP meetings, they play a crucial role in bringing together different parties to discuss and address climate change. They provide a platform for global collaboration and the exchange of ideas, ultimately contributing to progress in tackling climate change as a global entity.

According to the podcast transcript, one of the key takeaways from COP28 is the significant presence of attendees linked to the fossil fuel industry at the summit. The transcript reveals that climate groups' analysis shows a record number of 2,456 individuals from the fossil fuel industry in attendance.

The podcast also highlights controversies surrounding the COP28 president, Sultan Ahmad al-Jabir, who is the CEO of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company. Prior to the summit and during its opening days, over 130 legislators from the US and EU called for his removal. Additionally, he had to address backlash over comments questioning the need to phase out fossil fuels by emphasizing that he and the UAE respected climate science.

This information raises concerns about the influence of corporate interests, particularly from the fossil fuel industry, on climate action at COP28. The significant number of attendees linked to the fossil fuel industry prompts questions about the extent to which their interests may impact the negotiations and decisions made at the summit.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1542_COP28Results.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the importance of personalized communication from conservation organizations. He shares his frustrations with generic emails and constant donation requests, emphasizing the need for organizations to understand their audience's preferences and provide value beyond just asking for money. Andrew also reflects on his own journey in communications and his passion for using his skills to work with conservation organizations.

Tune in to learn more about effective communication in conservation and how it can help protect the ocean.

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The podcast host is currently enrolled in a Conservation Communications course offered by Conservation Careers. This online video course provides valuable knowledge and experience in communication strategies specifically tailored to the field of conservation. The host highly recommends the course, as it covers all the necessary tactics and strategies needed to excel in conservation communications. They are amazed by the success stories of individuals who have secured jobs after completing the course. Topics covered in the course include developing a communications plan, crafting engaging copy for conservation projects, securing press and media coverage, building and engaging social media audiences, creating content to support conservation initiatives, and measuring the effectiveness of communication activities. The host encourages listeners interested in a career in conservation and communications to visit the Conservation Careers website and sign up for one of their courses. As an added bonus, they provide a discount code for a 33% discount on any training course at Conservation Careers.

During the episode, the host suggests that an effective communication strategy involves allowing people to become familiar with the organization and the individuals working there. They believe that the people involved in these organizations are remarkable, passionate, and genuinely care about the environment. By showcasing the individuals and their projects, the host believes that it strengthens the organization's message.

The host emphasizes the importance of showcasing the people and projects to help the audience understand the magnitude of the problems at hand and how the proposed solutions can make a difference. This approach aims to establish a connection between the audience and the organization by humanizing the work being done. By getting to know the individuals involved, the host believes it fosters trust and engagement with the organization.

Additionally, the host highlights the significance of involving the community in the communication process. This goes beyond simply asking for donations and extends to seeking feedback, ideas, and stories from the audience. By actively involving the community, the host believes it creates a stronger and more supportive network. This engagement can take various forms, such as participating in call-to-action campaigns, signing petitions, or contacting relevant government representatives.

Overall, the host suggests that by allowing people to become acquainted with the organization and its members, and by actively involving the community in the communication process, it can lead to more effective communication and garner greater support for the organization's goals.

In the episode, the host delves into the importance of establishing an emotional connection between individuals and the conservation cause. They emphasize that this emotional connection can be a powerful tool for decision-making and community building.

The host explains that when people feel emotionally connected to a place or cause, it significantly influences their decision-making process. They note that this emotional connection can tug at the heartstrings of decision-makers, making them more inclined to take action. By highlighting the emotional connection between individuals and the conservation cause, it becomes easier to rally support and secure the necessary resources for implementing conservation projects.

Furthermore, the host suggests that celebrating both the successes and challenges of conservation projects can contribute to building a sense of community. By sharing achievements, people feel a sense of accomplishment and are motivated to continue supporting the cause. Additionally, by acknowledging setbacks and seeking assistance, it creates an opportunity for community engagement and collaboration. This fosters a stronger sense of community and encourages active participation in finding solutions.

The episode also touches on the role of social media and content creation in establishing emotional connections and building community. The host expresses frustration that many organizations do not fully utilize social media and content creation to connect with people and share their conservation efforts. They firmly believe that social media and content creation can be powerful tools for building emotional connections and generating support for conservation projects.

Overall, the episode highlights the importance of establishing an emotional connection between individuals and the conservation cause. By doing so, it can influence decision-making, foster community building, and ultimately lead to greater success in conservation efforts.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1541_HowOrganizationsCanDoBetterInSciComms.mp3
Category:SciComm -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin discusses the surprising connection between whales, dolphins, and climate change. He shares insights from COP28 in Dubai, where the critical role of ocean animals in reducing greenhouse gases was highlighted. Lewin explores how these marine mammals can capture and store carbon, shedding light on the importance of protecting them for the sake of the environment.

Tune in to discover the unexpected ways in which whales and dolphins contribute to the fight against climate change.

Link to article: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/whales-dolphins-could-help-save-31624331

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According to the podcast episode, whales and dolphins possess the remarkable ability to combat climate change by capturing and storing carbon. This topic is currently being discussed at COP28 in Dubai, where the critical role of ocean animals, particularly marine mammals like whales, in capturing and storing carbon to fight climate change is being highlighted. The episode also emphasizes that protecting whales and dolphins can effectively reduce greenhouse gases. The whale and dolphin conservation group advocates for recognizing these ocean giants as a solution to the climate change crisis, with a role just as crucial as rainforests. The report "Whales in Hot Water" warns that climate change is adversely affecting whale populations by undermining their health and reproductive capabilities. It identifies warming oceans as a significant threat to numerous animal species.

Dr. Sylvia Earle stresses the importance of safeguarding ocean habitats and draws attention to the damage caused by climate change. She firmly believes that an ocean teeming with whales and dolphins can play a vital role in combating climate change. Dr. Earle argues that it is imperative for people to comprehend the potential loss if habitats continue to be destroyed. She urges action at COP28 to raise awareness about the detrimental effects of climate change on oceans and the potential of healthy oceans to mitigate climate change.

The episode also explores the connection between a healthy ocean and the well-being of marine animals. It emphasizes that protecting the ocean from various threats, including climate change, is essential for maintaining healthy populations of whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals. Additionally, thriving populations of phytoplankton, corals, seagrasses, mangroves, and salt marshes contribute significantly to reducing climate change.

The episode highlights the decline in krill populations, which serve as a major food source for baleen whales in the Southern Ocean. The decrease in krill has resulted in changes in animal migration patterns and prey selection. The WDC report underscores the need to protect these animals and emphasizes the role of whales and dolphins as a lifeline in the battle against climate change.

Overall, the episode underscores the significance of preserving ocean habitats and addressing climate change to ensure the well-being of marine animals and mitigate the effects of climate change.

The podcast actively encourages listeners to share their thoughts on protecting marine mammals and to take action for ocean conservation. The host expresses a desire to hear from listeners about their strategies for protecting whales, dolphins, and marine mammals in their respective countries. Furthermore, the host encourages listeners to share the podcast with others who may have an interest in learning more. This indicates that the podcast aims to engage its audience and inspire them to actively participate in protecting marine mammals and conserving the ocean.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1540_WhalesAndDolphinsCanHelpWithClimateChange.mp3
Category:climate change -- posted at: 12:47am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin interviews Jonathan Lenato, a flip-flop artist from Ocean Sole. They discuss the process of carving flip-flops into artistic pieces and the importance of reusing them. Jonathan shares his passion for the business and the eye-opening nature of their products. Listeners gain insight into the environmental impact of flip-flops and how Ocean Sole is making a difference. Join the conversation and learn how everyday items can be transformed into beautiful works of art while helping to protect the ocean.

Website: https://oceansole.com/en-ca
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Ocean Soul is a company that specializes in producing a wide range of products, with a particular focus on sculptures of wildlife and marine animals. However, they have also expanded their product line to include home items like cushions and stools. They even create sculptures of domestic animals such as dogs and cats. The company takes pride in offering a diverse range of products, boasting over a hundred different items to cater to various customer preferences and interests.

The skilled carvers at Ocean Sole rely heavily on their memory and previous experience when creating their products. Their expertise is such that they can often craft pieces without the need for reference photos or drafts. For instance, when carving giraffes, they can rely solely on their memory to guide them, knowing exactly what to do.

Nevertheless, there are instances where reference photos are necessary, especially when clients make specific requests. In such cases, the carvers may need to consult specific photos or drafts to ensure they capture all the necessary details accurately.

Overall, while the carvers primarily rely on their memory and experience, they are also adaptable and willing to use reference photos when needed to meet the specific requests of their clients.

The process of creating Ocean Sole's products involves several steps. It begins with gathering flip-flops and die-cutting them to create blocks. These blocks are then joined together and meticulously carved using a knife to shape the desired features, such as the body, legs, ears, and other intricate details. After carving, the products undergo a smoothing process using sandpaper, which reveals the curve of the knife. Once the smoothing is complete, the various parts, such as the ears, eyes, and tails, are assembled, and the product undergoes a balancing process.

Following the assembly and balancing, the products go through a thorough quality control process. This involves checking the positioning of all the details, such as the eyes and ears, and ensuring overall balance. If any issues are found, adjustments are made to meet the required standards.

Once the quality control is complete, the products are washed with powder soap and disinfected, ensuring they are ready for sale or storage. The entire process requires skill and craftsmanship, with the carvers considering themselves as artists. Unfortunately, the episode does not provide specific information regarding the time it takes to complete each step or the overall duration of the process.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1539_OceanSoleCarverJonathan1.mp3
Category:Ocean Sole -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, host Andrew Lewin dives into the controversial topic of deep-sea mining. While the focus has been on COP28, Andrew shifts the conversation to the recent developments in deep sea mining. He highlights reports from Greenpeace and mining websites that discuss countries and companies eager to start testing or continue testing deep-sea mining. Andrew raises questions about the viability and financial motivations behind these efforts.

Tune in to learn more about the potential impacts of deep-sea mining and how it may affect our oceans.

Links to article:
1) https://www.miningweekly.com/article/a-showdown-over-deep-sea-mining-is-taking-place-in-the-pacific-2023-11-28
2) https://www.greenpeace.org/international/press-release/64213/norways-greenlight-for-deep-sea-mining-in-the-arctic-shatters-international-credibility/
3) https://www.euronews.com/green/2023/08/02/deep-sea-mining-heres-which-countries-oppose-and-support-the-controversial-practice

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The host of the podcast, Andrew Lewin, has recently launched a daily newsletter dedicated to providing valuable information about the ocean. This newsletter serves as a complementary resource to the podcast episodes, ensuring that listeners stay up to date with ocean-related news that may not be covered in the show. Describing it as an "information highway," the host encourages listeners to access the newsletter either through the podcast or by subscribing to receive it directly in their inbox every weekday morning. Stressing its significance, the host emphasizes that the newsletter is a valuable tool for staying informed about ocean-related matters and urges listeners to sign up for it.

Excitingly, the podcast host announces the inclusion of job postings in the newsletter. These job opportunities are specifically related to the ocean and provide details about their locations and the organizations offering them. The host expresses enthusiasm for this new addition and hopes that it will gain traction among the audience. The overarching goal of the podcast and the host's company, Speak Up For Blue Media and Communications, is to inform listeners about ocean-related developments, empowering them to advocate for the ocean and take action towards its betterment. By signing up for the newsletter, which is sent every weekday morning, listeners can stay up to date with the latest information and job postings related to the ocean.

The podcast, titled "How to Protect the Ocean," and its host's company, Speak Up For Blue Media and Communications, are dedicated to educating listeners about the state of the ocean and inspiring them to become advocates for its preservation. Andrew Lewin emphasizes the importance of speaking up for the ocean and encourages listeners to actively engage and make a difference. The podcast aims to raise awareness about various ocean-related issues, including deep-sea mining, and foster meaningful conversations and discussions among its audience. Additionally, the host mentions a newsletter that listeners can subscribe to, ensuring they receive regular updates and information about the ocean. Overall, the podcast and the host's company are committed to educating and empowering listeners to protect and conserve the ocean.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1538_SomeCountriesAreLookingAtTestingDeep-SeaMining.mp3
Category:Deep-Sea Mining -- posted at: 9:16pm EDT

In this episode, we discuss the recent court ruling that has put Canada's plastic ban in jeopardy. Anthony, a plastics campaigner from Oceana Canada, joins us to shed light on the significance of the ruling. The court deemed the plastics being banned as non-toxic, which raised questions about the effectiveness of the ban. Anthony explains that the ruling challenges the listing of plastics as toxic under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, which serves as the foundation for the ban. He emphasizes that the ban is still in effect as the government plans to appeal the ruling. However, during the appeal process, no new regulations are expected to be implemented. Anthony highlights the need for strong regulations and encourages individuals to get involved at the local level by advocating for bylaws that ban single-use plastics in their communities. He also mentions the upcoming Global Plastics Treaty negotiations as an opportunity to address plastic pollution on a global scale.

Oceana Canada Website: https://oceana.ca/en/our-campaigns/plastics/


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The episode delves into the concept that spending time in nature can foster a deeper appreciation for the environment and a stronger desire to protect it. Both the host and guest express their belief in this idea, highlighting that when people immerse themselves in nature and form a connection with it, they are more inclined to safeguard it. The guest provides examples of individuals who engage in activities like hunting, fishing, or hobbies that involve being in the environment, and how they become advocates for preserving oceans and lands. The host concurs with this perspective, emphasizing that the more time people spend in nature, the more they develop a love for it and a commitment to its protection. They also underscore the significance of organizations like Oceana in nurturing this appreciation for nature and the environment.

The podcast episode also addresses the disconnect between the scientific community and policy-making when it comes to addressing environmental issues. The speaker expresses frustration with the scientific community's focus on monitoring and reporting environmental degradation without taking practical steps to effect change. They believe that there is a lack of communication and collaboration between the scientific world in academia and the policy world that shapes environmental decisions.

To bridge this gap, the speaker shares their personal experience of transitioning from academia to working on data and policy at WWF Canada. They specifically mention their work on freshwater health assessments and their efforts to protect the Great Lakes from flawed environmental policies. One example they highlight is the absence of regulation on road salt, which they argue has devastating effects on freshwater ecosystems.

The speaker also discusses their current role at Oceania Canada, where they work on the plastics campaign. They emphasize the importance of making science-based decisions and applying valuable research findings to policy-making. They mention their ability to engage with academics and read academic papers, which allows them to integrate the worlds of science and policy.

Overall, the episode suggests the need for improved communication and collaboration between the scientific community and policymakers to effectively address environmental issues. The speaker's personal experiences underscore the importance of incorporating science into practical policy-making and making evidence-based decisions.

In the episode, the speakers emphasize the significance of habituating people to new processes and ways of interacting with their surroundings in order to bring about sustainable changes. They stress that implementing drastic changes all at once can be met with resistance and pushback. Instead, they propose a gradual approach, starting with smaller, more manageable changes.

One example mentioned in the episode is the plastic movement, which originated from the issue of plastic straws and their impact on sea turtles. The speakers argue that beginning with small changes like these helps people adjust to new ways of doing things. They also note that these smaller changes are often the ones most widely discussed and covered in the media.

The speakers also discuss the idea of effecting change on a larger scale by starting at the local level. They encourage individuals to engage in local politics and advocate for bylaws that ban single-use plastics at sports venues, for instance. They believe that by initiating change at a local level, individuals can have a broader impact and inspire others to follow suit.

Overall, the episode underscores the importance of habituating people to new processes and ways of interacting with their surroundings to bring about sustainable changes. It emphasizes that change is a gradual process and that starting with smaller, manageable changes can be more effective in the long run. Additionally, the speakers encourage individuals to get involved in local politics and push for larger-scale changes to combat plastic pollution.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1537_OceanaCanadaPlasticsAnthonyMerante.mp3
Category:Plastic Pollution -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, host Andrew Lewin explores the world of electric vehicles, but with a twist. Instead of focusing on road transportation, he delves into the realm of electric boat motors and boats. He interviews Ben Sorkin, the CEO of Flux Marine, who discusses their mission to reduce pollutants in the water and atmosphere through the use of electric motors. With COP 28 and environmental concerns in the spotlight, Flux Marine is one of the companies pushing for change. Tune in to learn more about their efforts to make boating more sustainable and protect our oceans.

Flux Marine:
Website: https://www.fluxmarine.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fluxmarine/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100041791286601

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In this episode, the host emphasizes the significance of listener reviews and feedback for the podcast. By sharing their thoughts and reviews, listeners can help others make informed decisions about whether or not to listen to the podcast. The host also appreciates constructive feedback as it aids in the improvement of the podcast. Specifically, the host asks listeners to review the podcast on platforms like Apple Podcasts or Spotify, as it not only helps others understand the podcast's content but also benefits the podcast as a whole. Additionally, the host expresses gratitude towards listeners who take the time to review the podcast and encourages them to reach out through a video or on social media platforms like Instagram.

During the episode, the host mentions that links to Ben's company, website, and social media will be provided to make it easier for listeners to access more information. This demonstrates the host's desire to facilitate connections between listeners and Ben's work, encouraging further exploration and potential engagement with his company through various platforms.

The guest, Ben Sorkin, discusses his company, Flux Marine, and their innovative technology and initiatives aimed at improving the environment and enhancing experiences in boating and water activities. As the CEO of Flux Marine, Sorkin explains that their primary goal is to develop electric marine propulsion systems that offer the best boating experiences in the world.

Sorkin's passion for boating and the environment is evident as he shares his background and how the intersection of boating and the environment has been integral to his life. Growing up boating and having a love for engineering and working for an environmental education center, Sorkin was driven to think about the technology that could be developed to make boating more sustainable and enjoyable.

The host acknowledges the hard work and innovation that Flux Marine brings to the industry. He recognizes that entering this industry is not easy and requires frustration, investment, and experimentation. However, he appreciates the efforts of Flux Marine in providing a better and more sustainable way to enjoy boating.

Furthermore, the host emphasizes the importance of being on the water and connecting with nature. Whether it's freshwater or ocean water, being on the water always offers fun and different adventures. The host expresses excitement about the idea of experiencing these adventures with an electric motor from Flux Marine.

In conclusion, this episode highlights Flux Marine's commitment to developing innovative technology that not only improves the environment but also enhances the overall boating experience. The company's focus on sustainability and creating better experiences aligns with the guest's personal values and passion for boating and the environment.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1536_EVBoatsMotors1.mp3
Category:Electric Boats -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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