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Syndication

On this episode of the How to Protect the Ocean podcast, Executive Director Veronica Mikos from Healthy Seas discusses their efforts to clean up ghost fish farms. Despite some companies neglecting to follow regulations, Healthy Seas is actively working with governments and partners to enforce laws and clean up abandoned fish farms.

Tune in to learn more about their important work in protecting the oceans.

Website: https://www.healthyseas.org/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu56xH8MQxg&t=3s

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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Healthy Seas, as discussed in the podcast episode, is actively involved in cleaning up abandoned fish farms, also known as ghost farms. These ghost farms are a significant environmental concern as they pose a threat to marine life and the overall health of the ocean ecosystem. The organization has been focusing on addressing this issue by conducting clean-up operations in various locations, including Greece and other countries.

The discovery of ghost farms, where fish farms are abandoned and left behind with all their infrastructure and waste, highlights the negligence and environmental impact of such practices. These abandoned facilities can lead to pollution of coastlines, endanger marine life, and disrupt local communities that rely on the ocean for their livelihoods.

Healthy Seas has taken a proactive approach to address this issue by not only conducting clean-up operations but also engaging with local governments and authorities to enforce regulations and hold responsible parties accountable. The organization has emphasized the importance of raising awareness about the existence of ghost farms and advocating for stricter regulations to prevent such environmental crimes in the future.

Through collaborations with like-minded individuals, businesses, and volunteers, Healthy Seas has been able to mobilize resources and expertise to tackle the challenges posed by ghost farms. By sharing knowledge and experiences with other organizations working on similar issues globally, Healthy Seas aims to create a network of support and cooperation to protect marine environments from the impacts of abandoned fish farms.

One of the key aspects highlighted in the podcast episode is the collaboration that Healthy Seas engages in with various partners to address the issue of ghost fish farms. The organization works closely with government agencies at the local, regional, and federal levels to raise awareness, advocate for the enforcement of laws, and find long-term solutions to the problem.

Veronica Mikos, the Executive Director of Healthy Seas, mentions that they have been in close contact with the Ministry of Environment in Greece and other countries where the issue of ghost fish farms exists. The organization has also interacted with an office that examines environmental crimes. While the laws are in place, the implementation and enforcement are lacking. This has prompted Healthy Seas to work with government agencies to push for more effective enforcement mechanisms.

Additionally, the organization has been involved in extensive investigations to map out the problem of ghost fish farms. By working with journalists, lawyers, government officers, and other partners, Healthy Seas has gathered crucial data and insights into the extent of the issue. This collaborative effort has allowed them to identify patterns and gaps in the regulatory framework, leading to a more informed approach towards finding solutions.

Moreover, Healthy Seas emphasizes that the cleanup efforts are not just about removing the waste but serve as a tool for advocacy, awareness-raising, and community involvement. By engaging in educational programs with university students and partnering with like-minded organizations such as Bracenet, which repurposes fishing nets into accessories, Healthy Seas is actively working towards sustainable solutions and long-term change in addressing the environmental crime of ghost fish farms. Through these collaborations, the organization aims to create a positive impact on marine ecosystems and local communities affected by abandoned fish farms.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1618_ClearingGhostFarmsVeronikaHealthySeas.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 2:49am EDT

Dr. Andrew Thaler, a deep-sea biologist, and expert in utilizing crowdfunding for marine science projects, shares his success in funding side projects through platforms like Patreon, Kickstarter, and experiment.com. Over the past 10 years, he has raised $50,000 for various initiatives involving 3D printing, ROV technology, and sampling bottles.

Tune in to learn how Dr. Thaler's crowdfunding campaigns have made a significant impact and gain valuable insights for funding your marine conservation projects.

Andrew Thaler's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Andrew_Thaler/posts

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Do you want to join my Ocean Community?
Sign Up for Updates on the process: www.speakupforblue.com/oceanapp
 
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Crowdfunding platforms like Patreon and Experiment.com have been recognized as valuable tools for funding side projects in marine science and conservation, as discussed in a podcast episode featuring Dr. Andrew Thaler, a deep-sea biologist. Dr. Thaler shared his successful experience using Patreon to fund various projects, including the OpenCTD, research papers, and aid missions to countries affected by natural disasters.

Dr. Thaler stressed the importance of cultivating a dedicated audience and engaging with them through platforms like Twitter and Patreon. He noted that Patreon enabled him to raise funds for projects that traditional sources might overlook, such as high-risk pilot studies and creative media endeavors.

The benefits of Experiment.com were also highlighted as a platform that combines foundation support with crowdfunding, making it easier for researchers to secure funding for their scientific projects.

The podcast episode also addressed the challenges of using social media platforms for crowdfunding, noting the evolving landscape. While platforms like Twitter were once effective for promoting campaigns, their effectiveness has diminished in recent years. Dr. Thaler emphasized the importance of direct outreach to potential supporters, engaging with communities, and utilizing traditional platforms like email to promote crowdfunding efforts.

In summary, the episode showcased how crowdfunding platforms like Patreon and Experiment.com offer researchers and conservationists an alternative funding source for their marine science and conservation side projects.

Maintaining support on crowdfunding platforms like Patreon requires engaging with your audience and providing regular updates on your projects. Dr. Andrew Thaler, a deep-sea ecologist and conservation technologist, shared his experience with Patreon, emphasizing the importance of transparency and communication with supporters.

Dr. Thaler keeps his patrons informed through his blog, Southern Fried Science, rather than posting private content on Patreon. By sharing updates on his projects, research findings, and activities, he ensures his supporters are aware of how their contributions are being utilized, building trust and keeping patrons engaged.

Additionally, Dr. Thaler highlighted the significance of providing value to patrons through perks like custom stickers. Introducing a sticker campaign on Patreon significantly increased his funding and engagement levels. By offering tangible rewards and involving other artists in creating unique stickers, he enhanced the overall experience for his supporters.

Furthermore, Dr. Thaler stressed the importance of personal interactions and one-on-one conversations in securing support for crowdfunding projects. Many of his donations came from in-person conversations and direct outreach efforts, establishing connections with potential supporters and leading to long-term commitments.

In conclusion, maintaining a strong relationship with your audience, providing regular updates, offering valuable perks, and engaging in personal interactions are key strategies for sustaining support on crowdfunding platforms like Patreon. By fostering a sense of community and transparency, creators can cultivate a loyal and supportive fan base for their projects.

Building partnerships and engaging with other creators on platforms like Patreon can be a valuable strategy to connect with communities interested in supporting your work. Dr. Andrew Thaler, a deep-sea ecologist and conservation technologist, highlighted the importance of interacting with other Patreon creators who produce similar creative media. Subscribing to other creators and engaging with their content can establish connections within communities sharing an interest in your work.

Dr. Thaler emphasized utilizing Patreon as a social network to connect with like-minded creators. While some campaigns may not yield significant financial returns, engaging with other creators can lead to valuable partnerships and collaborations. By interacting with fellow creators on Patreon, you can tap into existing communities interested in supporting your projects.

Moreover, Dr. Thaler mentioned that in-person conversations have been instrumental in securing donations for his projects, underscoring the importance of building personal connections and engaging directly with individuals to garner support for your work. Actively reaching out to potential supporters, whether online or in person, can expand your network and connect with communities aligned with your goals and interests.

Overall, building partnerships and engaging with other creators on platforms like Patreon can not only help access funding but also foster a sense of community and collaboration within your niche. By actively participating in the Patreon community and forming connections with other creators, you can enhance visibility, attract supporters, and establish meaningful relationships contributing to the success of your projects.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1615_10YearsOnPatreonAndrewThaler.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin shares two incidents that highlight people's disregard for the environment and the ocean. Despite these frustrations, he expresses gratitude for listeners who are committed to learning and helping protect the ocean. Andrew also mentions his hoarse voice from a recent family gathering to celebrate his late father's life. 

Tune in to learn about ocean conservation efforts and how you can make a difference for a better ocean.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
Sign up for our Newsletter: http://www.speakupforblue.com/newsletter
 

One of the key takeaways from the podcast episode is the importance of holding individuals more accountable for their actions that harm the ocean and its inhabitants. The episode highlighted two specific incidents where people displayed reckless behavior towards the ocean.

The first incident involved a group of young adults in Florida who were caught discarding items from their boat directly into the ocean instead of properly disposing of them on land. This irresponsible behavior not only contributes to marine pollution but also shows a lack of respect for the marine environment.

The second incident was even more shocking, where a man in New Zealand attempted to body slam an orca whale and its calf. This dangerous and disrespectful act towards these intelligent marine mammals could have resulted in serious harm to both the man and the whales.

Both of these incidents underscore the need for stronger enforcement and harsher penalties for individuals who engage in such harmful actions. The podcast host emphasized that the fines imposed on these individuals were not sufficient to deter similar behavior in the future.

The episode also touched upon the broader issue of accountability in environmental conservation. It highlighted how the decision-making of individuals, such as littering in the ocean or engaging in dangerous interactions with marine wildlife, can have significant negative impacts on the marine ecosystem.

Ultimately, the podcast episode calls for a shift towards greater accountability for individuals who harm the ocean and its inhabitants. It advocates for stricter enforcement of regulations, higher fines for offenders, and a collective responsibility to protect and preserve the marine environment for future generations.

Climate change policies and actions need to be taken seriously to prevent further environmental damage. The episode highlights the importance of addressing climate change through effective policies and actions. It discusses a concerning incident where the governor of Florida decided to remove all climate change policies from regulations, indicating a lack of concern for the environmental impacts. This decision is alarming, especially considering the predicted increase in severe storms due to rising ocean temperatures.

The episode emphasizes the need for strong climate change policies to mitigate the effects of global warming. It points out that ignoring climate change will not make it disappear; instead, it will exacerbate issues such as sea-level rise, extreme weather events, and flooding. The consequences of inaction on climate change are evident in Florida, where record flooding and rising water tables are already affecting residents.

Furthermore, the episode underscores the interconnectedness of environmental issues, highlighting how irresponsible actions, such as littering in the ocean or endangering marine life, contribute to the degradation of ecosystems. The incident of a man attempting to body slam an orca whale in New Zealand exemplifies the reckless behavior that can harm wildlife and disrupt fragile ecosystems.

In conclusion, the episode stresses the urgency of taking climate change policies seriously to prevent further environmental damage. It calls for accountability and stricter enforcement of regulations to deter harmful actions that jeopardize the health of the planet. By addressing climate change through effective policies and responsible behavior, we can work towards a sustainable future for the ocean and the planet as a whole.

One of the key takeaways from the podcast episode is the importance of common sense and responsible waste disposal practices in protecting the ocean from pollution. The episode highlighted two incidents where individuals displayed a lack of regard for the environment by polluting the ocean. In one instance, a group of young adults on a boat in Florida were seen discarding items overboard instead of properly disposing of them on land. This irresponsible behavior not only harms marine life but also contributes to the growing issue of plastic pollution in the ocean.

The episode also discussed a disturbing incident where a man attempted to body slam an orca whale in New Zealand. This reckless behavior not only endangered the man but also posed a threat to the orca and its calf. Such actions demonstrate a blatant disregard for the well-being of marine animals and the delicate balance of the ocean ecosystem.

To prevent further pollution and harm to marine life, it is essential for individuals to exercise common sense and adopt responsible waste disposal practices. Properly disposing of waste, recycling materials, and reducing single-use plastics are simple yet effective ways to minimize pollution in the ocean. By taking these small steps, individuals can contribute to the preservation of marine habitats and the protection of marine species.

Overall, the podcast episode underscores the critical role that common sense and responsible waste disposal practices play in safeguarding the ocean from pollution. It serves as a reminder that every individual has a responsibility to act conscientiously and make environmentally conscious choices to ensure the health and longevity of our oceans.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1613_GuyJumpsOnOrcaGetsFined.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses a conservation project in Rio de Janeiro aimed at saving the Rio's dolphin from extinction. Highlighting the threats of chemical and oil pollution, dredging, noise, overfishing, and bycatch in three different bays, including Guanabara Bay, Sepetiba Bay, and Ilha Grande Bay, the episode explores the efforts to protect these dolphins in Brazilian waters.

Link to article: https://news.mongabay.com/2024/04/education-research-bring-rios-dolphins-back-from-the-brink-of-extinction/

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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Conservation efforts are crucial to protect the Rio's dolphins, also known as Guyana's dolphins, from extinction in three different bays off the coast of Rio de Janeiro. These dolphins are residential, meaning they do not leave the bays despite facing various threats such as chemical pollution, oil pollution, dredging, noise pollution, and overfishing. The health of the ocean ecosystem within these bays is vital for the survival of these dolphins.

The Guyana's Dolphin Institute, led by biologist Leonardo Flack, has been studying the dolphins in Septiba Bay since the 1990s to understand the challenges they face and find solutions to protect them. The dolphins in these bays are reproducing, but the survivability of their calves is low, leading to high mortality rates. The dolphins are also facing issues such as infectious diseases due to pollution and other factors.

Conservation efforts include monitoring the dolphin populations, studying their tissues for contamination levels, and implementing measures to reduce threats like noise pollution, chemical pollution, and overfishing. Marine protected areas have been established in some bays to restrict harmful activities and protect the dolphins. Additionally, efforts are being made to engage with the fishing community and promote ecotourism as a sustainable alternative to fishing.

The challenges faced in conserving these dolphins highlight the need for marine spatial planning, collaboration with various stakeholders, and long-term monitoring and research efforts. By addressing the threats and implementing conservation measures, there is hope to bring the Rio's dolphins back from the brink of extinction and ensure their role as apex predators and iconic species in the region.

The dolphins in Rio de Janeiro, specifically the Guyana's dolphins or Rio's dolphins, are facing a multitude of threats that are putting their survival at risk. These threats include chemical pollution, sewage contamination, noise pollution from ships, overfishing, and habitat degradation.

Chemical Pollution and Sewage Contamination: The bays where these dolphins reside, such as Guanabara Bay, are heavily impacted by chemical pollution and sewage contamination. Up to 80% of sewage from the region is untreated and pumped directly into the bay, contaminating the water with pathogens and pharmaceuticals. This pollution has led to a compromised immune system in the dolphins, making them more susceptible to infectious diseases.

Noise Pollution from Ships: The presence of a large number of ships in the bays results in significant noise pollution. The noise interferes with the dolphins' communication, which is crucial for their hunting, communication within the pod, and protection of calves. The disruption in communication due to noise pollution can lead to the exclusion of certain pod members, including calves, which can have detrimental effects on the population.

Overfishing: The expansion of urban areas and industrial activities has pushed fishers into areas where the dolphins frequent. As a result, dolphins are getting caught in fishing nets, leading to accidental bycatch. Overfishing not only impacts the dolphins' food source but also poses a direct threat to the dolphins themselves.

Habitat Degradation: The bays where the dolphins reside have experienced habitat degradation due to urban expansion, sedimentation, and contamination. For example, Guanabara Bay has seen a drastic decline in the dolphin population, with only 30 individuals remaining out of the 400 that were present in the 1980s. The degradation of their habitat has likely contributed to the decline in reproductive success and overall health of the dolphins.

In conclusion, the combination of these threats poses a significant challenge to the survival of the Guyana's dolphins in Rio de Janeiro. Conservation efforts must address these issues comprehensively, including implementing measures to reduce pollution, regulate noise levels from ships, manage fishing activities sustainably, and protect critical habitats. By addressing these threats, there is hope that the dolphin populations can recover and thrive in their natural environment.

Collaborative efforts involving researchers, conservationists, and local communities are crucial in implementing solutions to protect the dolphins and their habitats. In the podcast episode, it was highlighted how the Guyana's dolphins, also known as Rio's dolphins, are facing numerous threats in the bays off the coast of Rio de Janeiro. These threats include chemical pollution, sewage contamination, noise pollution from ships, overfishing, and habitat degradation.

Researchers like Leonardo Flack from the Guyana's Dolphin Institute have been studying these dolphins for decades, understanding the dangers they face and working on solutions to protect them. Through collaborative efforts with other researchers, conservationists, and local communities, they have been able to monitor the dolphin populations, study their health, and identify the key threats they are facing.

One example of successful collaboration mentioned in the episode is the establishment of a marine protected area in Septiba Bay. This protected area prohibits the use of chemicals and fishing, allowing the dolphin population in that specific area to thrive. This initiative shows how working together with local communities and implementing conservation measures can have a positive impact on the marine environment and the species within it.

Furthermore, the episode highlighted the importance of engaging with local fishers to promote sustainable practices and alternative livelihoods, such as ecotourism. By involving the fishing community in conservation efforts and providing them with opportunities to support their families in a sustainable way, it not only benefits the dolphins but also the local economy and ecosystem.

Overall, the collaborative efforts between researchers, conservationists, and local communities play a vital role in protecting the dolphins and their habitats. By working together, sharing knowledge, and implementing solutions, it is possible to ensure the survival and well-being of these iconic marine species.

 

Direct download: HTPTO_E1606_RiosDolphinsBackFromBrinkOfExtinction.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Andrew Lewin discusses a company called Fallow that supports various conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. By purchasing a bracelet, individuals can support the tracking and conservation efforts of animals such as sharks, polar bears, penguins, sea turtles, and more. Andrew shares his personal experience of receiving a shark bracelet as a gift and highlights the importance of tracking studies in understanding and protecting marine species. He also explores the potential of this sales model in supporting conservation efforts and invites listeners to share their thoughts on the topic. 

To learn more about Fahlo and their bracelets, visit myfahlo.com.

Follow a career in conservation: https://www.conservation-careers.com/online-training/ Use the code SUFB to get 33% off courses and the careers program.
 
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The company Fallow is dedicated to supporting conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. When customers purchase a bracelet, a portion of the proceeds is donated to these organizations. Fallow has established partnerships with renowned organizations like the Sea Turtle Conservancy, Polar Bears International, Saving the Blue, Global Penguin Society, and the Marine Conservation Lab at Florida International University, among others. Each bracelet is uniquely designed to represent a specific animal, allowing customers to choose which animal they would like to support. These bracelets not only serve as a means of contribution but also as a symbol of support.

Fallow's bracelets offer buyers the opportunity to actively support the conservation efforts of real animals. Each bracelet is associated with a particular animal, such as a shark, polar bear, penguin, sea turtle, lion, giraffe, elephant, or gorilla. By purchasing the corresponding bracelet, buyers can directly contribute to the conservation of their chosen animal. These bracelets not only symbolize support but also provide information on the animal's journey and ongoing conservation efforts.

Supporting conservation organizations through purchases like these allows individuals to make a meaningful contribution, even if they are unable to donate large sums of money. In a podcast episode, Fallow is highlighted as a company that supports various conservation organizations through the sale of bracelets. Each bracelet represents a different animal, and the proceeds from sales are dedicated to the conservation work and tracking of these animals. By purchasing a bracelet for $25, individuals can actively contribute to the conservation of species such as sharks, polar bears, penguins, and sea turtles.

Direct download: HTPTO_E1548_TrackYourSharkSeaTurtlePolarBearPenguin.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Do you want to ensure a thriving planet for future generations of flora and fauna? Are you committed to preserving our natural ecosystems for years to come? If so, I have good news: there is a solution. By implementing long-term conservation efforts, we can achieve the result of a sustainable and healthy environment. Through measures such as habitat protection, sustainable resource management, and conservation education, we can ensure that our planet remains vibrant and full of life. It's up to us as environmentalists to take action and advocate for these efforts, to ensure a better future for all. Let's work together towards the result of a thriving, resilient planet.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Realize the critical importance of enduring conservation measures for our planet's well-being.

  • Investigate the innovations and improvements of recent conservation technologies.

  • Tackle and overcome preconceptions about adopting green lifestyles and practices.

  • Recognize and applaud the ongoing achievements in the field of conservation.

  • Grasp the value of engaging with listeners and raising consciousness about environmental issues.

We need to be more positive about this world in conservation.

 
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Join the audio program - Build Your Marine Science and Conservation Career:
 
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Direct download: HTPTO_E1470_OceanConservationIsAWorkInProgress.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

There was a great conversation happening on TikTok (yes, TikTok) on Dr. Virginia Schutte's account regarding wastefulness and our environment. 

The video series started with Virginia stitching another creator on her comments about being judged for her family using paper plates. Virginia responded by saying that she chooses not to judge anyone on their lifestyle and rather approaches people with love and support to help others understand what conservation is and that not everyone is able to do conservation. 

A number of other comments were generated from the first video and Virginia had great responses to them. I discuss them in this episode and add my own thoughts on conservation and how we and corporations can act to help our blue planet. 

Virginia's TikTok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@vgwschutte

Meteor podcast: https://meteorscicomm.org/

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Direct download: SUFB_S1255_IndividualsVSCorporations.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This episode is purely motivational. I find that there is a perception that people should do everything perfectly if they are going to be eco-friendly. Apparently, there is no room for failure. You are either all eco-friendly or you are not at all. And that is the wrong way of thinking. 

Changing human behaviour is hard and it takes time to achieve your full goals. I provide examples of how I changed certain aspects of my life to improve myself. I oftentimes will throw things against the wall to see what sticks and work on improving myself each time. 

Don't be afraid about failure and act now for the Ocean.

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Direct download: SUFB_S1164_YouDontHaveToBePerfectToLiveForABetterOcean.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In my quest to become more sustainable, I've discovered companies that are registered B-Corporations. These corporations strive to be socially, economically and environmentally ethical with their business. The businesses usually use their mission to drive something special such as providing clothes for the needy or protecting the environment. People buy from these companies because they believe in their mission.

I recently found out that a company for which I order their products on a regular basis has become certified as a B-Corp and have teamed up with Terracyle to truly recycle their products into long-lasting products such as park benches. I am a consultant for this company and I can help you get set up with buying these products if you use similar items. Now you know that the products can be truly recycled and reused. 

Here is a link to the list of products that can be used by Terracyle:
http://www.speakupforblue.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/IMG_0822.jpg

Here is the link to the Arbonne website:
https://www.arbonne.com/

If you use me as a consultant, the money will go directly back into the Network of Podcasts so we can work to reach and inspire more people to live for a better Ocean.

Email me andrew@speakupforblue.com for more information.

The second part of the episode was an update on Ontario's Bill 229, which was a budget bill to help with the economic effects of COVID-19; however, it contains a clause that took away the powers of Conservation Authorities. Take a listen to find out what happened. 

 

Direct download: SUFB_S1093_NewBCorpAndOntarioPassesBadBill.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

The Ocean is in trouble. There is no doubt about that.However, there are ways that we can fix it. And it starts with us!

There are a number of things that you can do to live for a better Ocean. It starts at home and we've discussed it on the podcast many times. I figured since some of you have been loyal listeners to the Speak Up For Blue podcast for the past year and a bit and have changed the way you lived at home to an Ocean conscious life, then you might be ready to step up your Marine Conservation game and make more of a commitment to protecting the Ocean. If you are still changing things at home, no worries. Listen to this podcast for the future. You might just get motivated (#MotivationMondays)

In this Episode, I present 4 steps to better protect the Ocean:

Step 1: Learn About an Ocean Issue
Step 2: React properly to the Ocean Issue
Step 3: Find out who is working on the solution to the Ocean Issue
Step 4: Get involved with those who are working on a solution to the Ocean Issue

Do you want to work in a career in Marine Conservation

Connect with me andrew@speakupforblue.com

You can also connect with me to find out how you can live for a better Ocean by using Arbonne health and wellness products that are healthy for you and the Ocean. Contact me andrew@speakupforblue.com

You can also support this podcast by contribution to our Patreon Campaign

Enjoy this Motivation Monday Episode!

Direct download: SUFB_S213_4StepsToHelpProtectTheOcean.mp3
Category:Conservation -- posted at: 8:30am EDT

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